Publications by authors named "Jesús Badia Closa"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

How to Learn a Complex Endoscopic Procedure: Knots in Transanal Endoscopic Surgery: Different Skill Among Surgeons.

Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 2021 Jul 8. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Department of Colorectal Surgery and General Digestive Surgery, Parc Tauli University Hospital, Institut d'investigació i Innovació Parc Tauli I3PT, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), Sabadell (Barcelona), Spain.

Purpose: The intrarectal suture is considered a high technically complex procedure. The study's objectives were to assess the feasibility of making an intrarectal knot, through an in vitro study and assessing whether the video tutorial facilitates learning.

Materials And Methods: A detailed description of the technique. A comparative observational cross-sectional study in surgeons with no previous experience in intrarectal knots.

Results: Twenty-one of these 32 participants passed the intrarectal knot test without video tutorial (T1) (65.6%), and 26 (81.2%) after the video tutorial (T2) (P=0.26). The mean time taken to tie the knot fell from 74 seconds (SD=46) in T1 to 41 seconds (SD=41) in T2 (P<0.001). At T1, 26 participants (81.3%) described the technique as difficult, but only 7 (21.9%) at T2 (P<0.001).

Conclusions: Performing the intrarectal knot suture is feasible. Despite the technical difficulty, the video tutorial is sufficient for surgeons to learn the technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLE.0000000000000969DOI Listing
July 2021

Femoral artery pseudoaneurysm following anterior inguinal hernia repair.

Cir Esp (Engl Ed) 2021 Jun 23. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

Hospital Universitario Parc Taulí, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cireng.2021.06.004DOI Listing
June 2021

Is percutaneous cholecystostomy safe and effective in acute cholecystitis? Analysis of adverse effects associated with the technique.

Cir Esp (Engl Ed) 2021 Apr 23. Epub 2021 Apr 23.

Unidad de Cirugía Hepato-Bilio-Pancreática, Servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Barcelona, España.

Introduction: The main objective of our study is to assess the safety and efficacy of percutaneous cholecystostomy for the treatment of acute cholecystitis, determining the incidence of adverse effects in patients undergoing this procedure.

Material And Method: Observational study with consecutive inclusion of all patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis for 10 years. The main variable studied was morbidity (adverse effects) collected prospectively. Minimum one-year follow-up of patients undergoing percutaneous cholecystostomy.

Results: Of 1223 patients admitted for acute cholecystitis, 66 patients required percutaneous cholecystostomy. 21% of these have presented some adverse effect, with a total of 22 adverse effects. Only 5 of these effects, presented by 5 patients (7.6%), could have been attributed to the gallbladder drainage itself. The mortality associated with the technique is 1.5%. After cholecystostomy, one third of the patients (22 patients) have undergone cholecystectomy. Urgent surgery was performed due to failure of percutaneous treatment in 2 patients, and delayed in another 2 patients due to recurrence of the inflammatory process. The rest of the cholecystectomized patients underwent scheduled surgery, and the procedure could be performed laparoscopically in 16 patients (72.7%).

Conclusion: We consider percutaneous cholecystostomy as a safe and effective technique because it is associated with a low incidence of morbidity and mortality, and it should be considered as a bridge or definitive alternative in those patients who do not receive urgent cholecystectomy after failure of conservative antibiotic treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ciresp.2021.03.012DOI Listing
April 2021

Management of intra- and post-operative complications during TEM/TAMIS procedures. A systematic review.

Minerva Chir 2021 Jan 12. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Colorectal Unit, Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Parc Taulí University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain.

Introduction: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a safe procedure and the rates of intra- and post-operative complications are low. The information in the literature on the management of these complications is limited, and so their importance may be either under- or overestimated (which may in turn lead to under- or overtreatment). The present article reviews the most relevant series of TEM procedures and their complications and describes various approaches to their management.

Evidence Acquisition: A systematic review of the literature, including TEM series of more than 150 cases each. We analyzed the population characteristics, surgical variables and intraoperative and postoperative complications.

Evidence Gathering: A total of 1043 records were found. After review, 1031 were excluded. The review therefore includes 12 independent cohorts of TEM procedures with a total of 4395 patients. The rate of perforation into the peritoneal cavity was 5.1%, and conversion to abdominal approach was required in 0.8% of cases. The most frequent complications were acute urinary retention (AUR, 4.9%) and rectal bleeding (2.2%). Less common complications included abscesses (0.99%) and rectovaginal fistula (0.62%). Mortality rates were low, with a mean value of 0.29%.

Conclusions: Awareness and knowledge of TEM complications and their management can play an important role in their treatment and patient safety. Here, we present a review of the most important TEM series and their complication rates and describe various approaches to their management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4733.20.08405-9DOI Listing
January 2021

Pancreatic trauma: Complex pancreatic fistula management.

Cir Esp (Engl Ed) 2020 Dec 12. Epub 2020 Dec 12.

Unidad de Cirugía Hepatobiliopancreática, Servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Barcelona, España. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ciresp.2020.11.001DOI Listing
December 2020

Correction to: Esogastro-Pleuro-Bronchial Fistula: An Unusual Complication After Sleeve Gastrectomy.

Obes Surg 2020 Dec;30(12):5187

Gastrointestinal Unit, Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Parc Taulí University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Parc Taulí s/n, 08208, Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain.

Due to a Production error Figs. 1 and 2 were omitted from the original article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-020-04786-9DOI Listing
December 2020

Urinary catheter in colorectal surgery: current practices and improvements in order to allow prompt removal. A cross-sectional study.

Minerva Surg 2021 Feb 25;76(1):72-79. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

Department of Colorectal Surgery, Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Parc Taulí University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Sabadell, Spain.

Background: Despite the publication of the guidelines for enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), attitudes to urinary catheter (UC) management vary widely in colorectal surgery. The aim of the present study was to define current practices in UC management in colorectal surgery.

Methods: Cross-sectional observational study carried out in March-April 2019, based on the responses to a survey administered to public hospitals in Catalonia. Respondents were asked about their observance of ERAS programs, the percentage of laparoscopic procedures performed, and the time of UC withdrawal in surgery of the colon and rectum.

Results: Forty-three of 45 hospitals contacted eventually responded (95.6%). As two hospitals reported that they did not perform colorectal surgery, the study is based on the results from 41 centers. Thirty-five (85.4%) reported following ERAS programs; 30 (73.2%) have coloproctology units, and 39 (95.1%) perform more than 70% of colorectal surgeries by laparoscopy. In colon surgery, 27 (65.9%) remove the UC at 24 h, and 12 (29.3%) on day 2 or day 3. In rectal surgery, 17 (58.6%) remove the UC on day 2-3.

Conclusions: Management of UC in colon and rectal surgery varies widely. There is clearly room for improvement in UC management, but needs to be thoroughly assessed in randomized multicenter studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4733.20.08341-8DOI Listing
February 2021

Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Anterior Inguinal Hernia Repair.

Cir Esp (Engl Ed) 2020 Sep 10. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Hospital Universitario Parc Taulí. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Barcelona, España.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ciresp.2020.07.018DOI Listing
September 2020

Esogastro-Pleuro-Bronchial Fistula: an Unusual Complication After Sleeve Gastrectomy.

Obes Surg 2020 Oct;30(10):4122-4123

Gastrointestinal Unit, Department of General and Digestive Surgery, Parc Taulí University Hospital, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Parc Taulí s/n, 08208, Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-020-04701-2DOI Listing
October 2020

How to start and develop a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

Cir Esp (Engl Ed) 2020 Mar 10;98(3):119-126. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Comité Científico AEC, Servicio de Cirugía General y Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Parc Taulí, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Sabadell, Barcelona, España.

Our main goal is to describe how to start and develop a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The first step is to have an idea that will become the hypothesis and a main objective. A bibliographic search should be done to check for clinical interest and originality. Moreover, the study must be feasible and should be finished within 4 years. In order to start the multicenter study, a protocol should be written (in accordance with the SPIRIT guidelines Standard Protocol items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials), including the design type, sample size and participating hospitals. Randomization is key to the design and, therefore, the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) guidelines must be followed. However, if the study cannot be randomized, the TREND (Transparent Reporting of Evaluations with Non-Randomized Designs) guidelines are recommended. When the protocol is approved by the Ethics Committee for Clinical Investigation of the hospital, we ought to create visibility. It is suggested to register the trial on ClincalTrials.gov and submit its publication to indexed magazines. Financial resources are necessary to execute the study and maintain an online database. This allows the registry to be updated and accessible to all the participants in the study. What is more, randomization can be done immediately. And last, but not least, is motivation. Multicentricity equals to participation of all the chosen medical centers. Updating and motivating them by sending a newsletter every 1-3 months keeps participants engaged in the study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ciresp.2019.11.012DOI Listing
March 2020
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