Publications by authors named "Jerry Van Dijk"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Source and sink activity of Holcus lanatus in response to absolute and relative supply of nitrogen and phosphorus.

Funct Plant Biol 2021 04;48(5):493-502

Environmental Sciences, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 8a, PO Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Mineral nutrients influence photosynthesis and tissue formation; a shift from nitrogen (N)-limited to phosphorus (P)-limited growth induced by high N deposition may change plant growth in terms of physiology and morphology. This experiment showed that absolute and relative N and P supply affected net photosynthesis (source activity) and biomass formation (sink activity), and the relationship between source and sink activities of Holcus lanatus L. under various nutrient treatments. H. lanatus was grown at three N:P ratios (5, 15, 45) with two absolute supply levels of N and P. Between N:P 5 at low level and N:P 45 at high level, and between N:P 45 at low level and N:P 5 at high level, there was a nine-fold difference in N and P supply. Maximum light-saturated net photosynthesis rate (Amax), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf area, and shoot and root biomass were determined during and after the growth process. Amax was minimal at N:P 5 and increased only with increasing absolute N supply. Neither SLA nor leaf area were affected by N:P; increasing absolute P supply significantly increased leaf area. Shoot and root biomass were minimal at N:P 45 and increased dramatically with increasing absolute P supply. Plant biomass was not correlated with Amax. Our results highlight that H. lanatus growth is predominantly controlled by P supply and to a lesser extent by N, whereas net photosynthesis exerted no apparent control on growth under these sink-limited growth conditions. Our findings contribute to understanding of plant growth under sink-limited conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/FP20118DOI Listing
April 2021

Phosphorus fertilization is eradicating the niche of northern Eurasia's threatened plant species.

Nat Ecol Evol 2021 01 2;5(1):67-73. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

The greater bioavailability of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in the Anthropocene has strongly impacted terrestrial plant communities. In northwest Europe, because high N deposition is considered the main driver of plant diversity loss, European Union (EU) legislation to reduce N deposition is expected to promote plant species recovery. However, this expectation is simplistic: it ignores the role of other macronutrients. Analysing the relationship between plant species pools and species stoichiometric niches along nutrient gradients across northern Eurasia's herbaceous ecosystems, we found that both absolute and relative P availability are more critical than N or K availability. This result is consistent with stoichiometric niche theory, and with findings from studies of hyperdiverse forests and shrublands at lower latitudes. We show that ecosystems with low absolute and relative P availability harbour a unique set of threatened species that have narrower nutrient-based niche widths than non-threatened species. Such ecosystems represent a conservation priority, but may be further threatened by latent effects of relative P enrichment arising from reduction of N availability without simultaneous reduction of P. The narrow focus of EU legislation on reducing N, but not P, may therefore inadvertently increase the threat to many of Europe's already threatened plant species. An EU Phosphate Directive is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-01323-wDOI Listing
January 2021

Can sand nourishment material affect dune vegetation through nutrient addition?

Sci Total Environ 2020 Jul 28;725:138233. Epub 2020 Mar 28.

Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

In the Netherlands it is common to nourish the coastline with sand from the seabed. Foredunes are replenished with sand from the beach and can be transported further into the dune area. We investigated whether nourishment material alters the phosphorus (P) content of dune soil and the nitrogen (N):P ratio of dune vegetation in two areas: a mega sand nourishment with fixed foredunes (SE) and a traditional sand nourishment with dynamic foredunes (NWC). Four zones were considered: beach (zone 1), frontal foredunes (zone 2), foredunes crest (zone 3) and inner dunes (zone 4). We estimated the characteristics of fine (< 250-μm) and coarse (250-2000 μm) sand. Total P, P speciation and available P of SE and NWC were similar until zone 4. Zone 1-3 consisted mainly of coarse sand, whereas the sand in zone 4 was finer with higher amounts at NWC. Iron (Fe) bound P was comparable for fine and coarse sand in zone 1-3, but high contents were present in zone 4. In zone 1-3, calcium (Ca) bound P was mainly found in the fine fraction, which was abundant in the coarse fraction of zone 4. After a period of 4 years, the effect of dynamic dunes on P fractions and dune plant species was not apparent yet, although inblowing sand mainly consisted of fine sand with high contents of Ca-bound P. This may change over time, especially in dynamic dunes with higher eolian activity of fine sand. Consequently, pH buffering of the soil may increase because of a higher Ca‑carbonate content, which leads to decreased solubility of Ca-bound P and low P availability for the vegetation. Both low P availability and high buffering capacity are known environmental factors that facilitate endangered dune plant species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.138233DOI Listing
July 2020

Plant species occurrence patterns in Eurasian grasslands reflect adaptation to nutrient ratios.

Oecologia 2018 04 15;186(4):1055-1067. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Environmental Sciences, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, PO Box 80115, 3508 TC, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Previous studies of Eurasian grasslands have suggested that nutrient ratios, rather than absolute nutrient availabilities and associated productivity, may be driving plant species richness patterns. However, the underlying assumption that species occupy distinct niches along nutrient ratio gradients remains to be tested. We analysed plant community composition and nutrient status of 644 Eurasian wet grassland plots. The importance of nutrient ratios driving variation in species composition was analysed using ordination methods (DCA and CCA). Subsequently, we assessed the niche position and width along the most important nutrient ratio gradient [N:P] for each species. We found that the N:P ratio explained part of the variation in species composition independent from conventional explanatory variables. The N:P ratio explained less variation than soil moisture or pH, but more than productivity or the availability of N and P separately, highlighting its importance for grassland species composition. Species occupied distinct niches along the N:P gradient, and species' niche widths decreased toward extreme nutrient limitation. After correcting for niche position, there was no overall difference in niche width between endangered and non-endangered species. Surprisingly, endangered species with niche optima at the extreme P-limited end of the gradient had broader niches than their non-endangered counterparts. As species occupied distinct niches along a nutrient ratio gradient, future grassland conservation efforts may benefit from targeting changes in nutrient ratios, i.e. the balance between N and P, rather than only focussing on a general reduction in nutrient availability. However, what management interventions can be used for this purpose remains unclear.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-018-4086-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859057PMC
April 2018

Using Tailored Information and Public Commitment to Improve the Environmental Quality of Farm Lands: An Example from the Netherlands.

Hum Ecol Interdiscip J 2010 Feb 30;38(1):113-122. Epub 2009 Sep 30.

By adopting nature conservation practices, farmers can enhance the environmental quality and biodiversity of their land. In this exploratory study, a behavioral intervention that focused on improving Dutch farmers' nature conservation practices was developed and tested. This intervention was based on insights derived from social psychology and combined tailored information and public commitment. Participating farmers were divided in three groups: one group received tailored information only, one group received both tailored information and a public commitment manipulation, and one group served as a control. A questionnaire measuring relevant aspects of conservation was completed before and after the intervention. Results show that tailored information combined with public commitment making resulted in a stronger desire to engage in conservation, an increase in surface area of non-subsidized natural habitat, and an increase in time farmers spent on conservation. The intervention affected both subsidized and non-subsidized conservation, but the effects were stronger for non-subsidized conservation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10745-009-9282-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2828559PMC
February 2010

Changed isoflavone levels in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) leaves with disturbed root nodulation in response to waterlogging.

J Chem Ecol 2005 Jun;31(6):1285-98

Department of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The effect of disturbed root nodulation on the quantitative and qualitative composition of the main isoflavonoid glucoside malonates, glucosides, and aglycones in the leaves of Trifolium pratense L. grown under waterlogging conditions was investigated. Isoflavonoids are involved in the regulation of root nodule activity and the establishment of the mycorrhizal association. Isoflavonoid determination was performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and UV absorbance detection. In response to waterlogging, the concentrations of biochanin A and biochanin A-7-O-glucoside malonate, biochanin A-7-O-glucoside, and genistein-7-O-glucoside in the leaves increased two- to threefold after a lag period of 3 wk because of disturbed root nodulation. The other isoflavones detected formononetin, formononetin-7-O-glucoside malonate, and formononetin-7-O-glucoside-did not show any significant changes related to waterlogging. After restoring normal soil water conditions, the concentrations of biochanin A and its glucoside and glucoside-malonate rapidly returned to the initial values, whereas the concentration of genistein-7-O-glucoside remained high.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10886-005-5286-1DOI Listing
June 2005
-->