Publications by authors named "Jerry E Bouquot"

33 Publications

When Systematic Reviews are Not Done by Experts.

Authors:
Jerry E Bouquot

Oral Dis 2021 Jul 21. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Professor Emeritus & Past Chair, University of Texas School of Dentistry, Houston, Texas, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/odi.13970DOI Listing
July 2021

Thirteen Synchronous Multifocal Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors (CEOT): Case Report and Review of the Literature.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 May 18. Epub 2021 May 18.

Assistant Professor, Department of Diagnostic Sciences, West Virginia University School of Dentistry, Morgantown, WV. Electronic address:

Background: Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, Pindborg tumor) is a rare, benign, locally aggressive neoplasm of the jaws that accounts for approximately 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It was first defined by Pindborg in 1955 and has been reported approximately 350 times in the literature; 7 reported multiple (up to 4) synchronous lesions.

Materials And Methods: We report an individual with the largest number of CEOTs reported to date and provide a literature review of multifocal CEOT cases.

Results: A 30-year-old male presented to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the West Virginia University School of Dentistry (WVU SoD) to extract multiple impacted teeth previous to construction of a complete denture. A pantograph showed 15 impacted teeth, almost all associated with well-demarcated cyst-like radiolucencies, some with small, ill-defined radiopaque flecks. Microscopically, the lesions showed sheets and strands of polygonal epithelial cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Spread throughout the epithelium and connective tissue were small, spherical, amorphous, pale purplish calcifications. Each lesion was similar and consistent with a diagnosis of CEOT.

Conclusion: We report a patient with 13 independent CEOTs scattered throughout all quadrants. This case represents the largest number of Pindborg tumors or any other type of odontogenic tumor yet reported in a single individual.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2021.05.010DOI Listing
May 2021

The pararadicular radiolucency with vital pulp: Clinicopathologic features of 21 cemental tears.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2019 Dec 2;128(6):680-689. Epub 2019 Aug 2.

Adjunct Professor and Past Chair, Department of Diagnostic & Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Diagnostic Sciences, West Virginia University School of Dentistry, Morgantown, WV, USA.

Objective: The investigation was conducted to better characterize the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of cemental tears from a review of 21 cases.

Study Design: This was a retrospective review of consecutive cases collected from patient records of the investigators.

Results: Twenty-one cases were identified during an 8-year period. Maxillary incisors were most often affected (47.6%). All lesions presented with pain. They occurred as radiolucencies along the root of a vital or endodontically treated tooth and were classified as D-shaped (38.1%), thin-vertical-line (23.8%), thick-vertical-line (14.3%), J-shaped (19.0%), or periapical radiolucencies (4.8%). All lesions showed focal destruction of the lamina dura, with 66.7% exhibiting extension into the medullary bone. Histopathologic diagnoses included intramedullary fibrous scar (28.6%) and chronic fibrosing osteomyelitis (71.4%), all associated with embedded cemental fragments. Five associated teeth were also examined: All showed tears beneath the remaining cementum. Four cases were successfully treated with curettage without tooth extraction; endodontic therapy was performed, probably mistakenly, in 8 cases.

Conclusions: Cemental tears produced symptomatic, localized chronic inflammation characterized usually by a vertical radiolucency adjacent to a root. These lesions may not be as rare as previously thought and extraction may not be the best treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2019.07.012DOI Listing
December 2019

Symmetrical palatal fibromatosis: Five new cases and a review of the literature.

Oral Dis 2019 Apr 10;25(3):781-787. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Diagnostic & Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas School of Dentistry, Houston, Texas.

Objective: To present five cases of symmetrical palatal fibromatosis (SPF), a lesion reported very rarely in the English language literature, under more than a dozen different names, and to recommend the most appropriate name.

Methods: Five SPF cases are characterized with a literature review.

Results: Three females and two males, aged 20-39 years, presented with bilateral, symmetrical, asymptomatic, sessile, moderately firm, or soft (n = 2) masses of the lateral posterior hard palate; two were isolated to the tuberosities. All masses were normal in color, with smooth, non-ulcerated surfaces and occasional surface nodularity. Underlying bone was radiographically normal, and adjacent teeth were asymptomatic. All masses originated from supra-periosteal tissues over palatal bone, only secondarily extending to gingivae and/or crestal tuberosity. Cases were present between 4 months and 15 years, with no familial or environmental etiologies identified. Histopathologically, masses were comprised of dense, avascular fibrous tissue with scattered thick bands of collagen. Surface epithelium showed occasional long, thin, sometimes pointed rete processes, and subepithelial stroma contained scattered large, angular fibroblasts. Conservative surgical excision appeared curative in all cases.

Conclusions: The present investigators propose SPF as the most accurate name for this rare entity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/odi.13021DOI Listing
April 2019

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Case of the Month.

J Mich Dent Assoc 2015 May;97(5):36-41

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May 2015

Massive, mixed, cystic lesion of the mandibular midline.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2014 Jul 16;118(1):9-15. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Baylor College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX, USA; Department of Diagnostic & Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.01.013DOI Listing
July 2014

Technetium-99mTc MDP imaging of 293 quadrants of idiopathic facial pain: 79% show increased radioisotope uptake.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2012 Jul;114(1):83-92

Department of Diagnostic & Biomedical Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Texas, Health Sciences Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Objective: To evaluate the association between facial pain and maxillofacial scintigraphy.

Methods: A total of 117 patients with idiopathic facial pain (IFP) (88% females; average age = 46.7 years) underwent 99mTc-MDP scans, as did 32 age-matched controls. Pearson χ(2) analysis was used to determine associations.

Results: Of subject quadrants, 63% were painful (average duration: 5.4 years); 79% of painful quadrants had positive 99mTc-MDP scans, i.e., "hot spots," significantly different from 13% in nonpainful quadrants (P < .0001). Five percent of controls had quadrants with hot spots; the proportion of hot spots in subjects versus controls was significantly different (P < .0001). No difference was found between pain-free quadrants in subjects and controls (P = .0688).

Conclusions: A positive 99mTc-MDP scan is strongly correlated with the location of pain in IFP, and patients with IFP have significantly more hot spots than controls, suggesting that pain in some IFP is associated with or caused by cancellous bone disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2012.02.019DOI Listing
July 2012

Chronic lingual papulosis: new, independent entity or "mature" form of transient lingual papillitis?

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2012 Jan 3;113(1):111-7. Epub 2012 Feb 3.

Department of Diagnostic & Biomedical Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Objective: Several acute, usually pediatric variants of edematous, symptomatic fungiform lingual papillitis have been reported since the 1990s, most notably transient lingual papillitis (TLP); but no chronic forms have been mentioned. Is there a chronic counterpart, akin to the older palatal examples of inflammatory papillary hyperplasia? The objective of this study was to clinicopathologically characterize a previously unreported entity with clustered, chronic fibrous papules (nonsyndromic) of the tongue.

Methods: Cases were collected from clinics in 2 dental schools.

Results: Five women and 4 men were identified with multiple, moderately firm, slightly pedunculated, normally colored masses clustered at the tip of the tongue (n = 4), covering the dorsal surface (n = 4) or on the lateral border (n = 1); 2 showed several erythematous or edematous papules (similar to TLP) admixed with fibrous papules. Patient ages ranged from 31 to 62 years (average 49) and all lesions had been present for many years. All lesions were asymptomatic except for the lateral border lesion, which presented with a burning sensation and mild tenderness (disappeared with antifungal medication). Five cases were associated with mouth breathing or a tongue-thrust habit; 4 were associated with geographic tongue or fissured tongue. Four papules were biopsied. All were composed of dense, avascular fibrous tissue with no or very few inflammatory cells; one showed focal mild neovascularity and edema. The lesion appeared to represent altered filiform papillae, more so than fungiform papillae.

Conclusions: Chronic lingual papulosis (CLP) is an innocuous entity represented by focal or diffuse enlargement of numerous lingual papillae, primarily the filiform papillae. It appears to usually have an adult onset and most likely represents papillary reaction to very low-grade, chronic irritation or desiccation. Some cases with childhood onset, however, seem to be variations of normal anatomy. No treatment or biopsy is required, but a number of systemic disorders and syndromes must be ruled out before applying the CLP diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2011.09.003DOI Listing
January 2012

Papillary tip melanosis (pigmented fungiform lingual papillae).

Tex Dent J 2011 Jun;128(6):572-3, 576-8

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, University of Texas School of Dentistry at Houston, USA.

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June 2011

Bone healing in critical-size defects treated with new bioactive glass/calcium sulfate: a histologic and histometric study in rat calvaria.

J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2010 Nov;95(2):269-75

Division of Periodontics, Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinic, Dental School of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University-UNESP, Brazil.

This study analyzed histologically the influence of new spherical bioactive glass (NBG) particles with or without a calcium sulfate (CS) barrier on bone healing in surgically created critical-size defects (CSD) in rat calvaria. A CSD was made in each calvarium of 60 rats, which were divided into three groups: C (control): the defect was filled with blood clot only; NBG: the defect was filled with NBG only; and NBG/CS: the defect was filled with NBG covered by CS barrier. Subgroups were euthanized at 4 or 12 weeks. Amounts of new bone and remnants of implanted materials were calculated as percentages of total area of the original defect. Data were statistically analyzed. In contrast to Group C, thickness throughout defects in Groups NBG and NBG/CS was similar to the original calvarium. At 4 weeks, Group C had significantly more bone formation than Group NBG/CS. No significant differences were found between Group NBG and either Group C or Group NBG/CS. At 12 weeks, Group C had significantly more bone formation than Group NBG or NBG/CS. NBG particles, used with or without a CS barrier, maintained volume and contour of area grafted in CSD. Presence of remaining NBG particles might have accounted for smaller amount of new bone in Groups NBG and NBG/CS at 12 weeks post-operative.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.31710DOI Listing
November 2010

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Atypical histiocytic granuloma (pseudolymphoma).

Tex Dent J 2010 Jul;127(7):698-9, 704-5

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

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July 2010

T-786C polymorphism of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis of the jaws.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2010 Apr 24;109(4):548-53. Epub 2010 Feb 24.

Cholesterol Center, Jewish Hospital of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Objective: We hypothesized that, similar to idiopathic hip osteonecrosis, the T-786C mutation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene affecting nitric oxide (NO) production was associated with neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis of the jaws (NICO).

Design: In 22 NICO patients, not having taken bisphosphonates, mutations affecting NO production (eNOS T-786C, stromelysin 5A6A) were measured by polymerase chain reaction. Two healthy normal control subjects were matched per case by race and gender.

Results: Homozygosity for the mutant eNOS allele (TT) was present in 6 out of 22 patients (27%) with NICO compared with 0 out of 44 (0%) race and gender-matched control subjects; heterozygosity (TC) was present in 8 patients (36%) versus 15 control subjects (34%); and the wild-type normal genotype (CC) was present in 9 patients (36%) versus 29 controls (66%) (P = .0008). The mutant eNOS T-786C allele was more common in cases (20 out of 44 [45%]) than in control subjects (15 out of 88 [17%]) (P = .0005). The distribution of the stromelysin 5A6A genotype in cases did not differ from control subjects (P = .13).

Conclusions: The eNOS T-786C polymorphism affecting NO production is associated with NICO, may contribute to the pathogenesis of NICO, and may open therapeutic medical approaches to treatment of NICO through provision of L-arginine, the amino-acid precursor of NO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2009.11.011DOI Listing
April 2010

The use of digital volume tomography in imaging an unusually large composite odontoma in the mandible.

Pediatr Dent 2009 Sep-Oct;31(5):438-41

Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, USA.

The odontoma is the most common of all odontogenic tumors. Digital volume tomography (DVT) provides a major advantage of decreased radiation and cost-effectiveness, as compared to a conventional computed tomography. There is no known published report utilizing this DVT analysis for assessing and localizing on odontomo. The purpose of this case report was to document the use of digital volume tomography to assess an unusually large composite odontoma in the mondible. Tomographic sections revealed expansion of the buccol cortex and occasional thinning of both the buccol and lingual cortical plates, although there was no pronounced clinically detectable cortical expansion. The sections further demonstrated enomel ond dentin in on irregular mass bearing no morphologic similority to rudimentary teeth. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and intervention for treating on odontoma while demonstrating the value of tomographic imaging as on aid to diagnosis.
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February 2010

Accelerated osteogenic orthodontics technique: a 1-stage surgically facilitated rapid orthodontic technique with alveolar augmentation.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009 Oct;67(10):2149-59

Clinical Associate Professor, Periodontics, Case University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Purpose: Demineralization of a thin layer of bone over a root prominence after corticotomy surgery can optimize the response to applied orthodontic forces. This physiologic response is consistent with the regional acceleratory phenomenon process. When combined with alveolar augmentation, one is no longer strictly at the mercy of the original alveolar volume and osseous dehiscences, and fenestrations can be corrected over vital root surfaces. This is substantiated with computerized tomographic and histologic evaluations. Two case reports are presented that demonstrate the usefulness of the accelerated osteogenic orthodontics technique in de-crowding and space closing for the correction of dental malocclusions.

Materials And Methods: Orthodontics is combined with full-thickness flap reflection, selective alveolar decortication, ostectomy, and bone grafting to accomplish complete orthodontic treatment.

Results: Rapid tooth movement was demonstrated in both cases and stability up to 8 years of retention.

Conclusion: The accelerated osteogenic orthodontics technique provides for efficient and stable orthodontic tooth movement. Frequently, the teeth can be moved further in one third to one fourth the time required for traditional orthodontics alone. This is a physiologically based treatment consistent with a regional acceleratory phenomenon and maintaining an adequate blood supply is essential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2009.04.095DOI Listing
October 2009

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. White sponge nevus.

Tex Dent J 2008 Aug;125(8):692-3, 705-7

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, Houston, USA.

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August 2008

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Plasma cell gingivitis.

Tex Dent J 2008 Apr;125(4):372-3, 380-3

Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

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April 2008

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Angiocentric T-Cell lymphoma (midline lethal granuloma).

Tex Dent J 2007 Aug;124(8):764-5, 772-3

Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

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August 2007

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Herpes zoster (shingles).

Tex Dent J 2007 Jan;124(1):132, 136-8

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, USA.

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January 2007

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Focal osteoporotic marrow defect (Hematopotic bone marrow defect; focal hematopoietic hyperplasia).

Tex Dent J 2006 Nov;123(11):1061-2, 1066-8

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, USA.

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November 2006

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Osteosarcoma (osteogenic sarcoma), high grade.

Tex Dent J 2006 May;123(5):456-7, 462-3

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston, USA.

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May 2006

Full-thickness flap/subepithelial connective tissue grafting with intramarrow penetrations: three case reports of lingual root coverage.

Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 2005 Dec;25(6):561-9

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA.

Three case reports are presented that demonstrate the use of full-thickness flap/subepithelial connective tissue grafting for root coverage on the lingual surfaces of the mandibular anterior teeth. This is accomplished using an envelope full-thickness flap technique with intramarrow penetrations at the recipient site. Miller Class I, II, and III gingival recession defects and gingival perforation defects were treated. Complete root coverage was achieved in two Miller Class I gingival recession defects, in one Miller Class II gingival recession defect, and in two gingival perforation defects in areas that exhibited no radiographic evidence of bone loss. Partial root coverage was achieved in two Miller Class III gingival recession defects in an area that exhibited radiographic evidence of bone loss. Although the majority of the exposed root surface was covered in these two Miller Class III defects, about 1 mm of root surface remained exposed, which seemed to closely correspond to the amount of bone loss that was noted radiographically. A grafting technique has been presented that can be used to restore the functional properties of the lingual gingiva of the mandibular anterior teeth by repairing gingival defects and re-establishing the continuity and integrity of the zone of keratinized gingiva. Our clinical impression is that this has made it easier for the three patients presented in this report to maintain the lingual surfaces of the mandibular anterior teeth with routine oral hygiene measures.
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December 2005

Oral and maxillofacial pathology case of the month. Verruca plana (flat wart; Verruca plana juvenilis).

Authors:
Jerry E Bouquot

Tex Dent J 2005 Jun;122(6):579, 584-6

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Director of Surgical Pathology, University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, USA.

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June 2005

Assessment of risk factors for oral leukoplakia in West Virginia.

Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2005 Feb;33(1):45-52

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Sciences, SDB 219, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007, USA.

Objective: To assess risk factors associated with oral leukoplakia in a US population with high use of smoked tobacco and smokeless tobacco.

Methods: The RJ Gorlin Leukoplakia Tissue Registry was used to identify individuals with oral leukoplakia in West Virginia, USA. This case-control study consisted of 90 cases with oral leukoplakia and 78 controls with periapical cysts. Univariate-univariable (one dependent variable and one independent variable) and univariate-multivariable (one dependent variable and multiple independent variables) logistic regression modeling quantified the association between oral leukoplakia and potential explanatory variables.

Results: Unadjusted measures of association indicate that those with oral leukoplakia were more likely to be older [odds ratio of crude: OR(Crude) = 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.45-5.11], more likely to currently use smokeless tobacco (OR(Crude) = 3.16; 95% CI: 1.10-9.07), and more likely to currently use snuff (OR(Crude) = 8.32; 95% CI: 1.83-37.80). Individuals currently using smokeless tobacco or currently using snuff were more likely to have oral leukoplakia [adjusted odds ratio, OR(Adj) = 9.21 and 30.08; 95% CI: 1.49-57.00 and 2.67-338.48, respectively], after simultaneously adjusting for age, gender, currently using smoked tobacco, currently using alcohol daily, and dental prostheses use.

Conclusions: Generalizability is an issue when studying risk factors associated with oral leukoplakia because of geographical variations in the composition of smokeless tobacco (i.e. betel, lime, ash, and N-nitrosamines) and cultural variations in the use of tobacco (i.e. reverse smoking). Snuff was the main smokeless tobacco product currently used in West Virginia, and was strongly associated with oral leukoplakia, after adjusting for potential explanatory variables.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0528.2004.00195.xDOI Listing
February 2005
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