Publications by authors named "Jerome Myers"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Trends in Bone Marrow Sampling and Core Biopsy Specimen Adequacy in the United States and Canada: A Multicenter Study.

Am J Clin Pathol 2018 Oct;150(5):393-405

Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, University at Buffalo-The State University of New York.

Objectives: To assess bone marrow (BM) sampling in academic medical centers.

Methods: Data from 6,374 BM samples obtained in 32 centers in 2001 and 2011, including core length (CL), were analyzed.

Results: BM included a biopsy (BMB; 93%) specimen, aspirate (BMA; 92%) specimen, or both (83%). The median (SD) CL was 12 (8.5) mm, and evaluable marrow was 9 (7.6) mm. Tissue contraction due to processing was 15%. BMB specimens were longer in adults younger than 60 years, men, and bilateral, staging, and baseline samples. Only 4% of BMB and 2% of BMB/BMA samples were deemed inadequate for diagnosis. BM for plasma cell dyscrasias, nonphysician operators, and ancillary studies usage increased, while bilateral sampling decreased over the decade. BM-related quality assurance programs are infrequent.

Conclusions: CL is shorter than recommended and varies with patient age and sex, clinical circumstances, and center experience. While pathologists render diagnoses on most cases irrespective of CL, BMB yield improvement is desirable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcp/aqy066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6166687PMC
October 2018

The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

Cell Rep 2018 04;23(1):313-326.e5

Urologic Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address:

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is not a single disease, but several histologically defined cancers with different genetic drivers, clinical courses, and therapeutic responses. The current study evaluated 843 RCC from the three major histologic subtypes, including 488 clear cell RCC, 274 papillary RCC, and 81 chromophobe RCC. Comprehensive genomic and phenotypic analysis of the RCC subtypes reveals distinctive features of each subtype that provide the foundation for the development of subtype-specific therapeutic and management strategies for patients affected with these cancers. Somatic alteration of BAP1, PBRM1, and PTEN and altered metabolic pathways correlated with subtype-specific decreased survival, while CDKN2A alteration, increased DNA hypermethylation, and increases in the immune-related Th2 gene expression signature correlated with decreased survival within all major histologic subtypes. CIMP-RCC demonstrated an increased immune signature, and a uniform and distinct metabolic expression pattern identified a subset of metabolically divergent (MD) ChRCC that associated with extremely poor survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2018.03.075DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075733PMC
April 2018

Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal-Cell Carcinoma.

Authors:
W Marston Linehan Paul T Spellman Christopher J Ricketts Chad J Creighton Suzanne S Fei Caleb Davis David A Wheeler Bradley A Murray Laura Schmidt Cathy D Vocke Myron Peto Abu Amar M Al Mamun Eve Shinbrot Anurag Sethi Samira Brooks W Kimryn Rathmell Angela N Brooks Katherine A Hoadley A Gordon Robertson Denise Brooks Reanne Bowlby Sara Sadeghi Hui Shen Daniel J Weisenberger Moiz Bootwalla Stephen B Baylin Peter W Laird Andrew D Cherniack Gordon Saksena Scott Haake Jun Li Han Liang Yiling Lu Gordon B Mills Rehan Akbani Mark D M Leiserson Benjamin J Raphael Pavana Anur Donald Bottaro Laurence Albiges Nandita Barnabas Toni K Choueiri Bogdan Czerniak Andrew K Godwin A Ari Hakimi Thai H Ho James Hsieh Michael Ittmann William Y Kim Bhavani Krishnan Maria J Merino Kenna R Mills Shaw Victor E Reuter Ed Reznik Carl S Shelley Brian Shuch Sabina Signoretti Ramaprasad Srinivasan Pheroze Tamboli George Thomas Satish Tickoo Kenneth Burnett Daniel Crain Johanna Gardner Kevin Lau David Mallery Scott Morris Joseph D Paulauskis Robert J Penny Candace Shelton W Troy Shelton Mark Sherman Eric Thompson Peggy Yena Melissa T Avedon Jay Bowen Julie M Gastier-Foster Mark Gerken Kristen M Leraas Tara M Lichtenberg Nilsa C Ramirez Tracie Santos Lisa Wise Erik Zmuda John A Demchok Ina Felau Carolyn M Hutter Margi Sheth Heidi J Sofia Roy Tarnuzzer Zhining Wang Liming Yang Jean C Zenklusen Jiashan Zhang Brenda Ayala Julien Baboud Sudha Chudamani Jia Liu Laxmi Lolla Rashi Naresh Todd Pihl Qiang Sun Yunhu Wan Ye Wu Adrian Ally Miruna Balasundaram Saianand Balu Rameen Beroukhim Tom Bodenheimer Christian Buhay Yaron S N Butterfield Rebecca Carlsen Scott L Carter Hsu Chao Eric Chuah Amanda Clarke Kyle R Covington Mahmoud Dahdouli Ninad Dewal Noreen Dhalla Harsha V Doddapaneni Jennifer A Drummond Stacey B Gabriel Richard A Gibbs Ranabir Guin Walker Hale Alicia Hawes D Neil Hayes Robert A Holt Alan P Hoyle Stuart R Jefferys Steven J M Jones Corbin D Jones Divya Kalra Christie Kovar Lora Lewis Jie Li Yussanne Ma Marco A Marra Michael Mayo Shaowu Meng Matthew Meyerson Piotr A Mieczkowski Richard A Moore Donna Morton Lisle E Mose Andrew J Mungall Donna Muzny Joel S Parker Charles M Perou Jeffrey Roach Jacqueline E Schein Steven E Schumacher Yan Shi Janae V Simons Payal Sipahimalani Tara Skelly Matthew G Soloway Carrie Sougnez Angela Tam Donghui Tan Nina Thiessen Umadevi Veluvolu Min Wang Matthew D Wilkerson Tina Wong Junyuan Wu Liu Xi Jane Zhou Jason Bedford Fengju Chen Yao Fu Mark Gerstein David Haussler Katayoon Kasaian Phillip Lai Shiyun Ling Amie Radenbaugh David Van Den Berg John N Weinstein Jingchun Zhu Monique Albert Iakovina Alexopoulou Jeremiah J Andersen J Todd Auman John Bartlett Sheldon Bastacky Julie Bergsten Michael L Blute Lori Boice Roni J Bollag Jeff Boyd Erik Castle Ying-Bei Chen John C Cheville Erin Curley Benjamin Davies April DeVolk Rajiv Dhir Laura Dike John Eckman Jay Engel Jodi Harr Ronald Hrebinko Mei Huang Lori Huelsenbeck-Dill Mary Iacocca Bruce Jacobs Michael Lobis Jodi K Maranchie Scott McMeekin Jerome Myers Joel Nelson Jeremy Parfitt Anil Parwani Nicholas Petrelli Brenda Rabeno Somak Roy Andrew L Salner Joel Slaton Melissa Stanton R Houston Thompson Leigh Thorne Kelinda Tucker Paul M Weinberger Cynthia Winemiller Leigh Anne Zach Rosemary Zuna

N Engl J Med 2016 Jan 4;374(2):135-45. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

Background: Papillary renal-cell carcinoma, which accounts for 15 to 20% of renal-cell carcinomas, is a heterogeneous disease that consists of various types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal-cell carcinoma, and no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist.

Methods: We performed comprehensive molecular characterization of 161 primary papillary renal-cell carcinomas, using whole-exome sequencing, copy-number analysis, messenger RNA and microRNA sequencing, DNA-methylation analysis, and proteomic analysis.

Results: Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups on the basis of molecular differences associated with patient survival. Type 1 tumors were associated with MET alterations, whereas type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was observed in a distinct subgroup of type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas that was characterized by poor survival and mutation of the gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH).

Conclusions: Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway were associated with type 1, and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway was associated with type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in type 2 conveyed a poor prognosis. Furthermore, type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinoma consisted of at least three subtypes based on molecular and phenotypic features. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1505917DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4775252PMC
January 2016

Two cases of concomitant acquired aplastic anemia and systemic mastocytosis.

Hum Pathol 2014 Feb 31;45(2):417-20. Epub 2013 Oct 31.

Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87102, USA. Electronic address:

Reactive bone marrow mast cells reliably lack the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features of systemic mastocytosis (SM). We report two unusual cases of acquired aplastic anemia (AA) in which multifocal aggregates of bone marrow mast cells fulfilled morphologic and immunophenotypic criteria for SM according to the World Health Organization 2008 classification. In the absence of clinical symptoms attributable to SM, the patients were treated with immunosuppressive therapy directed towards AA. Clinical follow-up and subsequent bone marrow examination revealed no evidence of overt SM in either patient. These cases represent, to our knowledge, the first reported instances in which criteria for SM have been fulfilled in the presence of AA. However, given the clinical courses followed by our patients, the incidental identification of mast cell lesions consistent with indolent SM may be of uncertain significance in the setting of AA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2013.08.002DOI Listing
February 2014

The somatic genomic landscape of glioblastoma.

Cell 2013 Oct;155(2):462-77

Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization of more than 500 glioblastoma tumors (GBMs). We identify several novel mutated genes as well as complex rearrangements of signature receptors, including EGFR and PDGFRA. TERT promoter mutations are shown to correlate with elevated mRNA expression, supporting a role in telomerase reactivation. Correlative analyses confirm that the survival advantage of the proneural subtype is conferred by the G-CIMP phenotype, and MGMT DNA methylation may be a predictive biomarker for treatment response only in classical subtype GBM. Integrative analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles challenges the notion of therapeutic inhibition of a pathway as an alternative to inhibition of the target itself. These data will facilitate the discovery of therapeutic and diagnostic target candidates, the validation of research and clinical observations and the generation of unanticipated hypotheses that can advance our molecular understanding of this lethal cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2013.09.034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3910500PMC
October 2013

Effects of changes in narrative time on eye movements and recognition responses.

J Cogn Psychol (Hove) 2013 May;25(3):283-298

Hofstra University.

In two experiments we examined how temporal aspects of narrative events influence comprehension. In Experiment 1 participants read paragraphs in which a critical event was followed by a phrase that signaled a time shift ( versus ). Consistent with earlier findings (e.g., Zwaan, 1996), fixation durations were longer on the phrase that signaled a larger time shift. However, there was no evidence that a larger time shift affected the accessibility of event information in Experiment 1, when the dependent measure was ease of anaphor comprehension, or in Experiment 2, when a recognition probe task was used. Although the discontinuation of an event (Maurice versus painting) did not affect anaphor reading times, it did lead to longer recognition times for the event. These results indicate that at least some event aspects remain accessible following a change in time and that the dependent measure can have a critical impact on the conclusions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20445911.2013.768232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3698862PMC
May 2013

Using peripheral smear review, age and absolute lymphocyte count as predictors of abnormal peripheral blood lymphocytoses diagnosed by flow cytometry.

Leuk Lymphoma 2008 Sep;49(9):1731-7

Department of Pathology, Madigan Army Medical Center, 9040 Fitzsimmons, Tacoma, WA 98431, USA.

Absolute lymphocytosis in the elderly raises the possibility of malignancy and generally warrants further investigation. To better correlate clinical variables with the frequency of neoplastic lymphoid processes in this population, we retrospectively reviewed archived flow cytometric analyses from peripheral blood specimens on patients of 50 years of age and older that had been deemed suspicious for a lymphoproliferative process after peripheral smear review. Age, absolute lymphocyte count (ALC), white blood cell count and relative lymphocyte count were correlated with the results of flow cytometry. Of 71 total cases, 42 (59%) had an abnormal immunophenotype. Independent variables that showed significant differences between normal and abnormal immunophenotype were mean age (p = 0.001) and ALC (p = 0.0032). We combined age and absolute lymphocyte count variables to look for the best possible cutoff values to predict the likelihood of an abnormal immunophenotype. ALC cutoff values of >or=4 x 10(9) cells/L for patients over 67 years of age, and >6.7 x 10(9) cells/L for patients between 50 and 67 years of age, had a high sensitivity for detecting an abnormal immunophenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428190802251787DOI Listing
September 2008

From the combat medic to the forward surgical team: the Madigan model for improving trauma readiness of brigade combat teams fighting the Global War on Terror.

J Surg Res 2007 Mar 29;138(1):25-31. Epub 2006 Dec 29.

Department of Surgery, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington 98431.

Background: Medics assigned to combat units have a notable paucity of trauma experience. Our goal was to provide intense trauma refresher training for the conventional combat medic to better prepare them for combat casualty care in the War on Terror.

Materials And Methods: Our Tactical Combat Casualty Care Course (TC3) consisted of the following five phases: (1) One and one-half-day didactic session; (2) Half-day simulation portion with interactive human surgical simulators for anatomical correlation of procedures and team building; (3) Half-day of case presentations and triage scenarios from Iraq/Afghanistan and associated skills stations; (4) Half-day live tissue lab where procedures were performed on live anesthetized animals in a controlled environment; and (5) One-day field phase where live anesthetized animals and surgical simulators were combined in a real-time, field-training event to simulate realistic combat injuries, evacuation problems, and mass casualty scenarios. Data collection consisted of surveys, pre- and posttests, and after-action comments.

Results: A total of 1317 personnel participated in TC3 from October 2003 through May 2005. Over the overlapping study period from December 2004 to April 2005, 327 soldiers participated in the formal five-phase course. Three hundred four (94%) students were combat medics who were preparing for combat operations in Iraq or Afghanistan. Of those completing the training, 97% indicated their confidence and ability to treat combat casualties were markedly improved. Moreover, of those 140 medics who took the course and deployed to Iraq for 1 year, 99% indicated that the principles taught in the TC3 course helped with battlefield management of injured casualties during their deployment.

Conclusion: The hybrid training model is an effective method for training medical personnel to deal with modern battle injuries. This course increases the knowledge and confidence of combat medics deploying and fighting the Global War on Terrorism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2006.09.006DOI Listing
March 2007

Whipple disease: a case report and review of the literature.

Arch Pathol Lab Med 2005 Jul;129(7):933-6

Department of Pathology, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Wash 98431, USA.

Whipple disease is a chronic, relapsing, and multisystem disease. It presents a diagnostic challenge for both clinicians and pathologists. Recent advances in isolation and culture have identified the organism responsible for the disease to be a member of the order Actinomycetes designated Tropheryma whipplei. Several immune system changes have been noted in patients with Whipple disease, but whether these are primary or secondary is as yet undetermined. Long-term antibiotic therapy is required, and relapses are common, especially with central nervous system involvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1043/1543-2165(2005)129[933:WDACRA]2.0.CO;2DOI Listing
July 2005

Ethical use of tissue samples in genetic research.

Mil Med 2003 Jun;168(6):437-41

Department of Surgery, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA 98431, USA.

Many centrally based cancer protocols have begun to address the ethical issues concerning tissue banking for genetic research. A multidisciplinary subcommittee of the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board was established to determine the scope of the problem and offer a concise, user-friendly policy with guidelines on how to control and monitor the use of stored tissue for future genetic and molecular research. Our institution participates in 69 Southern Oncology Group or National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocols and 47 Children's Oncology Group protocols. Of these protocols, 22 of 69 and 36 of 47, respectively, asked for tissue to be stored for future biologic study. Only 4 of 69 and 3 of 47, respectively, deal with specific consent for future genetic/biologic research. The multidisciplinary committee developed a policy that dealt with the following areas: exempt status, waived consent, informed consent, deceased status, family studies, and information flow. An algorithm was created to establish a system of checks and balances concerning privacy, protection and an appeals process.
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June 2003

Vortex disaggregation for flow cytometry allows direct histologic correlation: a novel approach for small biopsies and inaspirable bone marrows.

Cytometry B Clin Cytom 2003 Mar;52(1):20-31

Department of Pathology, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington, USA.

Background: Many approaches to obtaining single cells from tissue for flow cytometric immunophenotyping are used; however, these methods result in tissue that is too disrupted for subsequent histologic examination. We introduce a new technique for cell dissociation of hematopoietic malignancies that preserves tissue for histology. This is especially important with small specimens for which this type of correlation is critical.

Methods: Fresh tissue from lymph node, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, skin, and other soft tissue biopsies, in addition to cores of inaspirable bone marrows, were briefly vortexed until the RPMI cell culture medium became cloudy. Larger specimens such as lymph nodes were sectioned before disaggregating, whereas smaller ones were vortexed in toto. Resultant flow cytometric analyses were compared with the histology and, in some cases, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) to determine whether the data were concordant. Cell suspensions of 104 specimens-composed of 48 lymph nodes, 19 bone marrow cores (BMCs), 11 GI biopsies, 11 skin/soft tissue biopsies, and 15 miscellaneous specimens-were prepared via vortex disaggregation.

Results: Flow cytometric analysis of 96 specimens (92.3%) showed adequacy of material and diagnostic correlation with the histology and IHC. Of the eight cases (7.7%) that were discordant, seven were attributable to significant specimen fibrosis or necrosis. With respect to tissue type, this method produced diagnostic cell suspensions for most lymph nodes (95.8%), GI biopsies (90.9%), and BMCs (89.5%); however, it was less useful for skin/soft tissue samples (81.8%).

Conclusions: Disaggregation of tissue for flow cytometric analysis by vortexing appears to provide adequate and representative cellular material. This technique is ideal for inaspirable bone marrows and small biopsies where tissue preservation for histology is paramount.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cyto.b.10002DOI Listing
March 2003

Do readers make inferences about conversational topics?

Mem Cognit 2002 Sep;30(6):945-57

Department of Psychology, Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota 55105, USA.

When we read that two protagonists in a story chatted together for a couple of minutes, do we draw inferences about the topic of the conversation on the basis of information presented earlier in the text? Participants read passages in which protagonists part and later reunite; the passages ended with a sentence either that implied conversation or did not. In Experiment 1, participants' continuation sentences indicated that inferences about the topic of conversation were drawn. Recognition probe data in Experiment 2 provided more immediate evidence of such inferences. Experiment 3 addressed a possible confound in Experiment 2 and again provided evidence that readers inferred the continuation of the conversation. In Experiments 4 and 5, we investigated the effect of having the targeted conversational topic be a secret that should not be shared between the protagonists. The results are discussed in terms of the collaboration between passive, memory-based text processing and schema-driven comprehension processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/bf03195779DOI Listing
September 2002

Working wives and housewives: do they differ in mental status and social adjustment?

Am J Orthopsychiatry 1979 Apr;49(2):282-291

Department of Sociology.

Matched groups of working wives and housewives drawn from a community sample did not differ on current and past psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and social functioning. They did differ markedly on enjoyment in and satisfaction from their work. The working women derived considerably more satisfaction from their outside jobs than either they or the housewives did from their work in the home.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-0025.1979.tb02609.xDOI Listing
April 1979