Publications by authors named "Jeong Rang Jo"

7 Publications

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Gluconeogenic signals regulate hepcidin gene expression via a CRBN-KLF15 axis.

BMB Rep 2021 Apr 2. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Research Institute of Aging and Metabolism, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566; Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu 41944; Department of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Korea.

Hepcidin (HAMP) is synthesized in the liver. It is a key ironregulatory hormone that controls systemic iron homeostasis. Cereblon (CRBN) and Kruppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) are known to regulate diverse physiological functions. In this study, we investigated the role of CRBN on hepatic hepcidin gene expression and production under gluconeogenic stimuli. Fasted mice as well as forskolin (FSK)- and glucagon (GLU)-treated mice had reduced serum iron levels but increased expression levels of hepatic Crbn and Klf15 and hepcidin secretion. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression analysis of fasted and Ad-Crbninfected mice revealed significant reduction of microRNA-639 (miR-639). Hepatic overexpression of Crbn elevated hepcidin expression and production along with Klf15 gene expression, whereas knockdown of Crbn and Klf15 markedly decreased FSK- and fasting-mediated induction of hepcidin gene expression and its biosynthesis in mouse livers and primary hepatocytes. Moreover, expression of KLF15 significantly increased the activity of hepcidin reporter gene. It was exclusively dependent on the KLF15-binding site identified within the hepcidin gene promoter. Overall, this study demonstrates that CRBN and KLF15 are novel mediators of gluconeogenic signal-induced hepcidin gene expression and production. Thus, CRBN and KLF15 might be novel potential therapeutic targets to intervene metabolic dysfunction.
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April 2021

Short-term treatment with glucosamine hydrochloride specifically downregulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α at the protein level in YD-8 human tongue cancer cells.

Int J Oncol 2014 May 11;44(5):1699-706. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, Keimyung University, Dalseo-gu 704-701, Republic of Korea.

Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a tumor angiogenic transcription factor composed of an α and β subunit. We investigated the effect of glucosamine hydrochloride (GS-HCl) on the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1β in serum‑treated YD-8 human tongue cancer cells. While long-term (24 h) treatment with GS-HCl strongly repressed the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1β at both the protein and mRNA levels, short-term (4 h) GS-HCl treatment inhibited HIF-1α at the protein level. Short-term GS-HCl treatment also decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K and S6, translation-related proteins. However, the results of subsequent pharmacological inhibition and protein stability analyses indicated that HIF-1α protein downregulation induced by short-term GS-HCl treatment was not through modulation of the mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling pathways, the 26S proteasomal and lysosomal activities and HIF-1α protein stability. Importantly, our further analyses identified that HIF-1α protein downregulation induced by short-term GS-HCl treatment was blunted by exogenous administration of the citric acid cycle metabolites citrate and 2-oxoglutarate, but not the glycolytic end byproducts pyruvate and lactate. These findings demonstrate firstly that short-term GS treatment selectively downregulates HIF-1α at the protein level in YD-8 cells via interference of production of the citric acid cycle metabolites. It is proposed that short-term GS-HCl exposure may be applied for the treatment of oral tumors with high expression of HIF-1α.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2014.2336DOI Listing
May 2014

Pinus densiflora leaf essential oil induces apoptosis via ROS generation and activation of caspases in YD-8 human oral cancer cells.

Int J Oncol 2012 Apr 11;40(4):1238-45. Epub 2011 Nov 11.

Department of Medical Genetic Engineering, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu 704-701, Republic of Korea.

The leaf of Pinus (P.) densiflora, a pine tree widely distributed in Asian countries, has been used as a traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of essential oil, extracted by steam distillation, from the leaf of P. densiflora in YD-8 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Treatment of YD-8 cells with P. densiflora leaf essential oil (PLEO) at 60 µg/ml for 8 h strongly inhibited proliferation and survival and induced apoptosis. Notably, treatment with PLEO led to generation of ROS, activation of caspase-9, PARP cleavage, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK-1/2 in YD-8 cells. Treatment with PLEO, however, did not affect the expression of Bax, XIAP and GRP78. Importantly, pharmaco-logical inhibition studies demonstrated that treatment with vitamin E (an anti-oxidant) or z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor), but not with PD98059 (an ERK-1/2 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK-1/2 inhibitor), strongly suppressed PLEO-induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells and reduction of their survival. Vitamin E treatment further blocked activation of caspase-9 and Bcl-2 down-regulation induced by PLEO. Thus, these results demonstrate firstly that PLEO has anti-proliferative, anti-survival and pro-apoptotic effects on YD-8 cells and the effects are largely due to the ROS-dependent activation of caspases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2011.1263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3584576PMC
April 2012

Anti-cancer properties of glucosamine-hydrochloride in YD-8 human oral cancer cells: Induction of the caspase-dependent apoptosis and down-regulation of HIF-1α.

Toxicol In Vitro 2012 Feb 13;26(1):42-50. Epub 2011 Oct 13.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412, Republic of Korea.

Evidence suggests anti-tumor activities of glucosamine-hydrochloride (GS-HCl). In the present study, we investigated anti-proliferative, growth suppressive and/or pro-apoptotic effects of GS-HCl on YD-8 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Fundamentally, treatment with GS-HCl strongly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells, as determined by MTS and DNA fragmentation analyses. Of further note, as measured by Western analyses, GS-HCl treatment led to activation of caspase-3, cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c, down-regulation of Mcl-1 and HIF-1α, up-regulation of GRP78, an indicator of ER stress, and generation of ROS in YD-8 cells. Importantly, results of pharmacological inhibition studies showed that treatment with z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, but not with vitamin E, an anti-oxidant strongly blocked the GS-HCl-induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells. Analyses of additional cell culture works further revealed that GS-HCl had a strong growth suppressive effect on not only YD-8 but also YD-10B and YD-38, two other human OSCC cell lines. These findings collectively demonstrate that GS-HCl has anti-proliferative, anti-survival, and pro-apoptotic effects on YD-8 cells and the effects appear to be mediated via mechanisms associated with the mitochondrial-dependent activation of caspases, down-regulation of Mcl-1, and induction of ER stress. Considering HIF-1α as a tumor angiogenic transcription factor, the ability of GS-HCl to down-regulate HIF-1α in YD-8 cells may further support its anti-cancer property. It is thus suggested that GS-HCl may be used as a potential anti-cancer drug against human OSCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2011.10.005DOI Listing
February 2012

Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 in NCI-H292 human alveolar epithelial carcinoma cells: roles of p38 MAPK, ERK-1/2, and PI3K/PKB signaling proteins.

J Cell Biochem 2011 Oct;112(10):3015-24

Department of Medical Genetic Engineering, Keimyung University School of Medicine, 1000 Dalgubeol-daero, Dalseo-gu, Daegu 704-701, Korea.

Evidence suggests overexpression of COX-2 and its role in many human cancers, including lung. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying COX-2 overexpression in lung cancer is not fully understood. We herein investigated whether COX-2 is overexpressed in human airway cancer cell lines, including A549 (lung), Hep-2 (bronchial), and NCI-H292 (alveolar). When grown in cell culture medium containing 10% FBS (serum), of note, there was strong and transient induction of COX-2 protein and mRNA in NCI-H292 cells, but little or low COX-2 expression is seen in A549 or Hep-2 cells. Interestingly, strong and sustained activities of ERK-1/2, JNK-1/2, p38 MAPK, and PKB were also shown in NCI-H292 cells grown in presence of serum. Profoundly, results of pharmacological inhibition studies demonstrated that the serum-dependent COX-2 up-regulation in NCI-H292 cells is attributed to not only the p38 MAPK-, PI3K/PKB-, and ERK-1/2-mediated COX-2 transcriptional up-regulation but also the p38 MAPK- and ERK-1/2-mediated post-transcriptional COX-2 mRNA stabilization. Of further note, it was shown that the ERK-1/2 and PI3K/PKB (but not COX-2, p38 MAPK, and JNK-1/2) activities are necessary for growth of NCI-H292 cells. These findings collectively demonstrate for the first time that COX-2 expression is transiently up-regulated by serum addition in NCI-H292 cells and the serum-induced COX-2 expression is closely linked to the p38 MAPK-, ERK-1/2-, and PI3K/PKB-mediated COX-2 transcriptional and post-transcriptional up-regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.23226DOI Listing
October 2011

Preparation of branched dextran microspheres of soluble interferon-alpha and its activity in vitro and in vivo.

J Microbiol Biotechnol 2011 Feb;21(2):176-82

Department of Medical Genetic Engineering, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-712, Korea.

The study objective was to prepare biodegradable branched dextran microspheres encapsulated with His-tagged interferon-alpha (BDM-hIFN-alpha) and evaluate its activity in vitro and in vivo. The glycidyl methacrylate derivatized dextrans (Dex-GMA) as precursor was primarily synthesized by substituting hydroxyl groups of either the branched or linear type of dextran with GMA. Dex-GMA microspheres loaded with hIFN-alpha was then prepared by the water-in-water emulsion technique. In vitro release and Western blotting experiments demonstrated the retained activity of hIFN-alpha released from branched dextran microspheres at 24 h by inducing phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator transcription-1 (STAT-1), a down-stream effector of IFN-alpha, in HepG2 cells. Animal data further revealed a peak of plasma levels of IFN-alpha in rats injected intravenously with BDM-hIFN-alpha at 10 min post-injection, but a sharp decline at 2 h. High plasma levels of neopterin, a plasma protein induced by IFN-alpha, were also detected in rats injected with BDM-hIFN-alpha at 10 min post-injection. Notably, plasma levels of neopterin remained high at 4 h, but largely declined thereafter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4014/jmb.1007.07060DOI Listing
February 2011

Aspirin induces apoptosis in YD-8 human oral squamous carcinoma cells through activation of caspases, down-regulation of Mcl-1, and inactivation of ERK-1/2 and AKT.

Toxicol In Vitro 2010 Apr 29;24(3):713-20. Epub 2010 Jan 29.

Department of Dentistry, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-dong, Jung-gu, Daegu 700-712, Republic of Korea.

NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors show anti-cancer activities in many cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs (aspirin or indomethacin) and COX-2 inhibitor (NS-398) on growth of YD-8 human oral squamous carcinoma cells. Interestingly, among drugs tested, aspirin showed strongest inhibitory effects on viability and survival of YD-8 cells. Profoundly, aspirin treatment resulted in severe cell shrinkage and nuclear DNA fragmentation in YD-8 cells, suggesting the aspirin-induced apoptosis in YD-8 cells. Data of Western blot further demonstrated that aspirin treatment caused activation of caspases, down-regulation of Mcl-1 protein, dephosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and AKT, and also IkappaB-alpha proteolysis-dependent NF-kappaB activation in YD-8 cells. Aspirin, however, had no effect on expressions of Bcl-2, XIAP, and HIAP-1 in YD-8 cells. Importantly, pretreatment with z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor blocked the aspirin-induced apoptosis and Mcl-1 down-regulation in YD-8 cells. These findings collectively suggest that aspirin induces apoptosis in YD-8 cells and the induction may be correlated to activation of caspases, caspase-dependent Mcl-1 proteolysis, inactivation of ERK-1/2 and AKT, and activation of NF-kappaB. It is suggested that aspirin may be applied a potential anti-cancer drug against human oral squamous carcinoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2010.01.010DOI Listing
April 2010