Publications by authors named "Jente Andresen"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The relationship between MRI and PET changes and cognitive disturbances in MS.

J Neurol Sci 2006 Jun 2;245(1-2):99-102. Epub 2006 May 2.

Department of Neurology 2082, Danish MS Research Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 9 Blegdamsvej, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) is present in approximately 50% of the patients. Only moderate correlations have been found between cognitive dysfunction and T(2) lesion load, black holes or atrophy. Cognitive dysfunction in MS is probably related to the overall disease burden of the brain including abnormalities in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and cortical grey matter, which is undetected with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hence, imaging techniques that embrace such abnormalities are needed to achieve better correlation with cognitive dysfunction. MR spectroscopy (MRS) performed with multi-slice echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) and PET measurements of brain metabolism as the cortical cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are imaging methods that are able to provide information on axonal loss or dysfunction in both MS lesions and in NAWM and cortical grey matter. Measurements of global NAA using multi-slice EPSI is a new promising method for measurement of the global neuron capacity and can be repeated with only little discomfort and without any risk for the patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2005.09.020DOI Listing
June 2006

Cognitive impairment in newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis patients: a 4-year follow-up study.

J Neurol Sci 2006 Jun 27;245(1-2):77-85. Epub 2006 Apr 27.

Department of Neurology, Section 6131, Danish Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Cognitive impairment occurs in early multiple sclerosis (MS), may decline over time, and has major impact on social functioning. The objectives of this study were to examine cognitive functioning in newly diagnosed MS, and to follow up over a period of 5 years. The results of the first three yearly re-examinations are reported. Eighty newly diagnosed (<1 year) MS patients participated (male/female: 19:61, mean age: 35 years, mean EDSS 2.7, course: 75 relapsing-remitting, 3 primary progressive, 2 secondary progressive). Seventy-five healthy persons served as controls. The neuropsychological (NP) test battery comprised 30 test measures and was grouped into seven cognitive domains. A residual score of -1.5 SD as cut-off point was used to diagnose cognitive impairment. At the first examination, 44-48% had cognitive impairment. None of the patients were clinically depressed, 51% had no signs of depression on Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and none had severe signs. Sixty-four patients completed four examinations, and a significant linear improvement over time was seen in three cognitive domains, no change in two domains, and deterioration in one domain. At the time of the fourth examination, 4.3 years since diagnosis, 33-34% of the patients had cognitive impairment. Thirty percent of the patients were on disablement pension, 34% received social services in relation to work and 13% had home care. Methodological problems are discussed, especially the practice effect and the importance of identifying sensitive and stable test measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2005.09.016DOI Listing
June 2006

Correlation of global N-acetyl aspartate with cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

Arch Neurol 2006 Apr;63(4):533-6

Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Kettegaard Alle 30, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark.

Background: Whole-brain N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a measure of neuronal function, can be assessed by multislice echo-planar spectroscopic imaging.

Objective: To test the hypothesis that the global brain NAA/creatine (Cr) ratio is a better predictor of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis than conventional magnetic resonance imaging measures.

Design: Survey.

Setting: Research-oriented hospitals.

Patients: Twenty patients, 16 women and 4 men (mean age, 36 years), with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score, 2.5).

Main Outcome Measures: Correlation between the global NAA/Cr ratio and a cognitive dysfunction factor comprising 16 measures from an extensive neuropsychological test battery that best distinguished patients with multiple sclerosis from healthy control subjects.

Results: A significant partial correlation between the global NAA/Cr ratio and the cognitive dysfunction factor was found (partial r = 0.62, P = .01), and 9 cognitively impaired patients had significantly lower global NAA/Cr ratios than 11 unimpaired patients (P = .04). No significant correlations were found between the cognitive dysfunction factor and conventional magnetic resonance imaging measures (ie, brain parenchymal fraction and lesion volume).

Conclusions: Multislice echo-planar spectroscopic imaging provides global metabolic measures that distinguish between cognitively impaired and unimpaired patients with multiple sclerosis and correlate with a global cognitive measure. Standardization of the technique is needed, and larger-scale studies that include healthy controls are suggested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archneur.63.4.533DOI Listing
April 2006

IQ stability: the relation between child and young adult intelligence test scores in low-birthweight samples.

Scand J Psychol 2003 Sep;44(4):395-8

Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Hospital Corporation, Kommunehospitalet, Denmark.

The stability of IQ from childhood to adulthood in low-birthweight subjects was measured in two independent samples with follow-up intervals of approximately 14 and 9.5 years. In both samples, intelligence was assessed with the WISC at a mean age of 9.5. Twenty-six subjects were retested with the WAIS at a mean age of 23.5, and 78 subjects with the BPP (the Danish Military Draft Board Intelligence Test) at the age of 19.1. Both samples obtained childhood and adult test scores below the expected means. For the Wechsler Verbal, Performance and Full-Scale IQs, the stability quotients were 0.86, 0.86, and 0.89 in the WAIS sample, and the retest correlations for the three IQs with the BPP score were 0.66, 0.65, and 0.74. Thus, the majority of children showed stable patterns of intellectual development from middle childhood to young adulthood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9450.00359DOI Listing
September 2003
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