Publications by authors named "Jenny Berry"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

STUMP un"stumped": anti-tumor response to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor based targeted therapy in uterine inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor with myxoid features harboring DCTN1-ALK fusion.

J Hematol Oncol 2015 Jun 11;8:66. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

Foundation Medicine, Inc, Cambridge, MA, 02141, USA.

Background: Recurrent, metastatic mesenchymal myxoid tumors of the gynecologic tract present a management challenge as there is minimal evidence to guide systemic therapy. Such tumors also present a diagnostic dilemma, as myxoid features are observed in leiomyosarcomas, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT), and mesenchymal myxoid tumors. Comprehensive genomic profiling was performed in the course of clinical care on a case of a recurrent, metastatic myxoid uterine malignancy (initially diagnosed as smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP)), to guide identify targeted therapeutic options. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of clinical response to targeted therapy in a tumor harboring a DCTN1-ALK fusion protein.

Methods: Hybridization capture of 315 cancer-related genes plus introns from 28 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer was applied to >50 ng of DNA extracted from this sample and sequenced to high, uniform coverage. Therapy was given in the context of a phase I clinical trial ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: ( NCT01548144 ).

Results: Immunostains showed diffuse positivity for ALK1 expression and comprehensive genomic profiling identified an in frame DCTN1-ALK gene fusion. The diagnosis of STUMP was revised to that of an IMT with myxoid features. The patient was enrolled in a clinical trial and treated with an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor (crizotinib/Xalkori®) and a multikinase VEGF inhibitor (pazopanib/Votrient®). The patient experienced an ongoing partial response (6+ months) by response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) 1.1 criteria.

Conclusions: For myxoid tumors of the gynecologic tract, comprehensive genomic profiling can identify clinical relevant genomic alterations that both direct treatment targeted therapy and help discriminate between similar diagnostic entities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13045-015-0160-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4467062PMC
June 2015

Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

Lung Cancer 2015 Jul 22;89(1):76-9. Epub 2015 Apr 22.

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, United States.

In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by vandetanib in combination with everolimus. Further research is required in this setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2015.04.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4998046PMC
July 2015

Use of scintillation proximity assay to measure radioligand binding to immobilized receptors without separation of bound from free ligand.

Methods Mol Biol 2012 ;897:79-94

GE Healthcare Biosciences, Cardiff, Wales, UK.

Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a bead-based homogeneous assay technology that removes the need for a filtration step to separate bound from free ligand in a receptor binding assay. SPA allows the rapid and sensitive assay of a wide range of molecular interactions in a homogeneous system and is routinely used for radioligand binding assays, particularly in drug screening applications where high throughput is required. Existing filter binding assays may be readily converted to SPA assays or assays may be directly developed in SPA format. This chapter describes the development of SPA radioligand binding assays detailing the choice of isotope, selection of SPA bead type, optimization of SPA bead and receptor ratio, optimization of assay buffer, selection of assay format, and assay validation including saturation binding, competition binding, and association/dissociation binding studies using SPA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-909-9_4DOI Listing
October 2012

Measurement of radioligand binding by scintillation proximity assay.

Methods Mol Biol 2005 ;306:121-37

The Maynard Centre, GE Healthcare Biosciences, Cardiff, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-927-3:121DOI Listing
June 2005

Ectopic bone formation using osteogenic protein-1 carried by a solution precipitated hydroxyapatite.

J Biomed Mater Res A 2004 Dec;71(3):412-8

Stryker Orthopaedics, 325 Corporate Drive, Mahwah, New Jersey 07430, USA.

Solution precipitation of calcium and phosphate is a technique to generate hydroxyapatite [Peri-Apatitetrade mark (PA), Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ] on metal substrate. This study was carried out to determine the capacity of PA to adsorb osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1) and the time course of release, and to determine the osteoinductive activity of OP-1. The adsorption and release studies were conducted with (125)I-labeled OP-1- and PA-coated titanium alloy disks. The results indicate that the adsorption of OP-1 on the PA-coated disks is linear with the concentration of OP-1 up to 5 mg/mL. There is an initial release of 75% to 80% of adsorbed OP-1 within the first hour, and 92% of OP-1 is released in 3 days. The osteoinductive activity of OP-1 was determined in the rat intramuscular ectopic bone formation assay. A total of 24 titanium alloy disks were evenly divided into 3 groups with different treatments for implantation, plain disks (group A), disks coated with PA (group B), and disks coated with PA plus 40 microg OP-1 (group C). Osteogenic protein-1, 40 microg in solution, was injected into the muscle pouch in animals of group D (n = 8). The rats were sacrificed 3 weeks postoperatively and the implants were retrieved. Ectopic bone formation was evaluated with radiography and histology. Results demonstrated that OP-1 induced ectopic bone in all the animals of group C and group D. The titanium alloy disks were surrounded by trabecular bone and marrow tissue. None of the animals of group A or group B showed any evidence of osteoinduction. Our findings indicate that PA can deliver OP-1 directly to titanium alloy implants and maintain the osteoinductive activity of OP-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.30151DOI Listing
December 2004
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