Publications by authors named "Jennifer M Bundy"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessing the Statistical Training in Animal Science Graduate Programs in the US: Survey on Statistical Training.

J Anim Sci 2021 Mar 19. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States of America.

Statistical analysis of data and understanding of experimental design are critical skills needed by Animal Science Graduate Students (ASGS). These skills are even more valuable with the increased development of high-throughput technologies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perceived statistical training of US ASGS. A survey with 38 questions was shared across US universities, and 416 eligible ASGS from 43 universities participated in this study. The survey included questions on the demographics and overall training, graduate education on statistics, and self-assessment on statistics and career path of ASGS. Several analyses were performed: relationship between perceived received education (PRE; i.e., how ASGS evaluated their graduate education in statistics) and perceived knowledge (PK; i.e., how ASGS evaluated their knowledge in statistics from their education), ranking of statistical topics based on PRE, PK, and confidence in performing statistical analyses (CPSA), cluster analysis of statistical topics for PRE, PK, and CPSA, and factors (demographic, overall training, interest in statistics, and field of study) associated with overall scores for PRE, PK, and CPSA. Students had greater (P < 0.05) PRE than PK for most of the statistical topics included in this study. The moderate to high repeatability of answers within statistical topics, indicate substantial correlations in ASGS answers between PRE and PK. The cluster analysis resulted in distinct groups of "Traditional" and "Non-Traditional" statistical topics. ASGS showed lower (P < 0.05) scores of PRE, PK, and CPSA in "Non-Traditional" compared with "Traditional" statistical methods. Several factors were associated (P < 0.05) with the overall scores of PRE, PK, and CSPA. In general, factors related to greater training and interest in statistics of ASGS were associated with greater overall scores, such as taking more credits in statistics courses, having additional training in statistics outside the classroom, knowing more than one statistics software, and more. This study provided comprehensive information on the perceived level of education, knowledge, and confidence in statistics in ASGS in the US. Although objective measurements of their training in statistics are needed, the current study suggests that ASGS have limited statistical training on topics of major importance for the current and future trends of data-driven research in animal sciences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jas/skab086DOI Listing
March 2021

Measuring birth weight and umbilical cord diameter at birth to predict subsequent performance in swine.

Transl Anim Sci 2021 Jan 19;5(1):txaa214. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.

In the swine industry, pre-weaning mortality, umbilical hernia incidence and pig market weight are a few contributing factors affecting profitability and welfare on farm. Therefore, the ability to reliably predict any of these outcomes is valuable to swine operations. Mortality during the pre-weaning phase, umbilical hernia incidence and poor-quality finisher pigs can represent a multi-million dollar loss and increase in welfare concerns to the producer. Consequently, the objective of this study was to evaluate whether birth weight (BW), umbilical cord diameter at birth (UCD), and the calculated umbilical diameter at birth to birth weight ratio (UCD:BW), are potential indicators of both placental efficiency and relative defect size in the abdominal musculature as well as reliable predictors of pre-weaning mortality, umbilical hernia incidence, and pig body weight at 150 d of age in a commercial facility. Mixed sex commercial piglets were followed through production. Four hundred sixty-five piglets were weighed within 1 h of birth, and the UCD was determined using digital calipers, these animals were followed through weaning. Three hundred eighty-five pigs of the 465 were followed through the post-wean phase in the nursery facility and checked for umbilical hernia incidence. Finally, of the 385 pigs, 177 pigs were assessed for umbilical hernia incidence and weighed a final time at the grower-finisher facility. All data were analyzed using PROC Logistic and PROC GLM procedures. The variables of UCD:BW and BW were significantly associated with the probability of increased pre-weaning mortality ( < 0.001). For example, piglets with a low UCD:BW, but an increased BW had the greatest survival rate. Umbilical diameter (UCD) was not significantly associated with pre-weaning mortality. Post-weaning mortality was not significantly affected by UCD:BW, BW, or UCD variables. Umbilical hernia incidence was not significantly affected by UCD:BW at the nursery phase or growing-finishing phase. Pig body weight at 150 d of age was significantly affected by UCD:BW, BW, and UCD variables < 0.001). For example, piglets that had a larger UCD weighed more at 150 d of age. In conclusion, measuring the calculated UCD:BW has the potential to be a novel tool for future research looking into the impacts of umbilical measurements as it relates to placental function, fetal development, piglet survivability and impacts on future performance of the animal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tas/txaa214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7780433PMC
January 2021