Publications by authors named "Jennifer Couch"

6 Publications

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The NCI Cancer Tissue Engineering Collaborative Research Program is a highly interdisciplinary and focused community.

iScience 2021 May 30;24(5):102441. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Division of Cancer Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2021.102441DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8111673PMC
May 2021

Education and Outreach in Physical Sciences in Oncology.

Trends Cancer 2021 01 7;7(1):3-9. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Department of Transplantation, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Center for Immunotherapeutic Transport Oncophysics, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address:

Physical sciences are often overlooked in the field of cancer research. The Physical Sciences in Oncology Initiative was launched to integrate physics, mathematics, chemistry, and engineering with cancer research and clinical oncology through education, outreach, and collaboration. Here, we provide a framework for education and outreach in emerging transdisciplinary fields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trecan.2020.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895467PMC
January 2021

Fasting and surgery timing (FaST) audit.

Clin Nutr 2021 03 5;40(3):1405-1412. Epub 2020 Sep 5.

East Midlands Surgical Academic Network, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK; Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals and University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK; MRC Versus Arthritis Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research, School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: International guidance advocates the avoidance of prolonged preoperative fasting due to its negative impact on perioperative hydration. This study aimed to assess the adherence to these guidelines for fasting in patients undergoing elective and emergency surgery in the East Midlands region of the UK.

Methods: This prospective audit was performed over a two-month period at five National Health Service (NHS) Trusts across the East Midlands region of the UK. Demographic data, admission and operative details, and length of preoperative fasting were collected on adult patients listed for emergency and elective surgery.

Results: Of the 343 surgical patients included within the study, 50% (n = 172) were male, 78% (n = 266) had elective surgery and 22% (n = 77) underwent emergency surgery. Overall median fasting times (Q1, Q3) were 16.1 (13.0, 19.4) hours for food and 5.8 (3.5, 10.7) hours for clear fluids. Prolonged fasting >12 h was documented in 73% (n = 250) for food, and 21% (n = 71) for clear fluids. Median fasting times from clear fluids and food were longer in the those undergoing emergency surgery when compared with those undergoing elective surgery: 13.0 (6.4, 22.6) vs. 4.9 (3.3, 7.8) hours, and 22.0 (14.0, 37.4) vs. 15.6 (12.9, 17.8) hours respectively, p < 0.0001.

Conclusions: Despite international consensus on the duration of preoperative fasting, patients continue to fast from clear fluids and food for prolonged lengths of time. Patients admitted for emergency surgery were more likely to fast for longer than those having elective surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2020.08.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7957363PMC
March 2021

Winter cancellations of elective surgical procedures in the UK: a questionnaire survey of patients on the economic and psychological impact.

BMJ Open 2019 09 13;9(9):e028753. Epub 2019 Sep 13.

Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK

Objectives: To quantify the economic and psychological impact of the cancellation of operations due to winter pressures on patients, their families and the economy.

Design: This questionnaire study was designed with the help of patient groups. Data were collected on the economic and financial burden of cancellations. Emotions were also quantified on a 5-point Likert scale.

Setting: Five NHS Hospital Trusts in the East Midlands region of England.

Participants: We identified 796 participants who had their elective operations cancelled between 1 November 2017 and 31 March 2018 and received responses from 339 (43%) participants.

Interventions: Participants were posted a modified version of a validated quality of life questionnaire with a prepaid return envelope.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measures were the financial and psychological impact of the cancellation of elective surgery on patients and their families.

Results: Of the 339 respondents, 163 (48%) were aged <65 years, with 111 (68%) being in employment. Sixty-six (19%) participants had their operations cancelled on the day. Only 69 (62%) of working adults were able to return to work during the time scheduled for their operation, with a mean loss of 5 working days (SD 10). Additional working days were lost subsequently by 60 (54%) participants (mean 7 days (SD 10)). Family members of 111 (33%) participants required additional time off work (mean 5 days (SD 7)). Over 30% of participants reported extreme levels of sadness, disappointment, anger, frustration and stress. At least moderate concern about continued symptoms was reported by 234 (70%) participants, and 193 (59%) participants reported at least moderate concern about their deteriorating condition.

Conclusions: The cancellation of elective surgery during the winter had an adverse impact on patients and the economy, including days of work lost and health-related anxiety. We recommend better planning, and provision of more notice and better support to patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028753DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6747666PMC
September 2019

Developing international open science collaborations: Funder reflections on the Open Science Prize.

PLoS Biol 2017 Aug 1;15(8):e2002617. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America.

The Open Science Prize was established with the following objectives: first, to encourage the crowdsourcing of open data to make breakthroughs that are of biomedical significance; second, to illustrate that funders can indeed work together when scientific interests are aligned; and finally, to encourage international collaboration between investigators with the intent of achieving important innovations that would not be possible otherwise. The process for running the competition and the successes and challenges that arose are presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2002617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5538631PMC
August 2017
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