Publications by authors named "Jeanine Umutesi Condo"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Conclusions of the digital health hub of the Transform Africa Summit (2018): strong government leadership and public-private-partnerships are key prerequisites for sustainable scale up of digital health in Africa.

BMC Proc 2018 15;12(Suppl 11):17. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

WHO Country Office, Kigali, Rwanda.

Background: The use of digital technologies to improve access to health is gaining momentum in Africa. This is more pertinent with the increasing penetration of mobile phone technology and internet use, and calls for innovative strategies to support implementation of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals and Universal Health Coverage on the continent. However, the huge potential benefits of digital health to advance health services delivery in Africa is yet to be fully harnessed due to critical challenges such as proliferation of pilot projects, poor coordination, inadequate preparedness of the African health workforce for digital health, lack of interoperability and inadequate sustainable financing, among others. To discuss these challenges and propose the way forward for rapid, cost-effective and sustainable deployment of digital health in Africa, a Digital Health Hub was held in Kigali from 8th to 9th May 2018 under the umbrella of the Transform Africa Summit 2018.

Methods: The hub was organized around five thematic areas which explored the status, leadership, innovations, sustainable financing of digital health and its deployment for prevention and control of Non-Communicable Diseases in Africa. It was attended by over 200 participants from Ministries of Health and Information and Communication Technology, Private Sector, Operators, International Organizations, Civil Society and Academia.

Conclusions: The hub concluded that while digital health offers major opportunities for strengthening health systems towards the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals including Universal Health Coverage in Africa, there is need to move from Donor-driven pilot projects to more sustainable and longer term nationally owned programmes to reap its benefits. This would require the use of people-centred approaches which are demand, rather than supply-driven in order to avoid fragmentation and wastage of health resources. Government leadership is also critical in ensuring the availability of an enabling environment including national digital health strategies, regulatory, coordination, sustainable financing mechanisms and building of the necessary partnerships for digital health.

Recommendations: We call on the Smart Africa Secretariat, African Ministries in charge of health, information and communication technology and relevant stakeholders to ensure that the key recommendations of the hub are implemented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12919-018-0156-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6117634PMC
August 2018

A population-based national estimate of the prevalence and risk factors associated with hypertension in Rwanda: implications for prevention and control.

BMC Public Health 2017 07 10;18(1). Epub 2017 Jul 10.

WHO Regional Office for Africa, Brazzaville, Congo.

Background: Hypertension is a leading cause of cardiovascular diseases and a growing public health problem in many developed and developing countries. However, population-based data to inform policy development are scarce in Rwanda. This nationally representative study aimed to determine population-based estimates of the prevalence and risk factors associated with hypertension in Rwanda.

Methods: We conducted secondary epidemiological analysis of data collected from a cross-sectional population-based study to assess the risk factors for NCDs using the WHO STEPwise approach to Surveillance of non-communicable diseases (STEPS). Adjusted odds ratios at 95% confidence interval were used to establish association between hypertension, socio-demographic characteristics and health risk behaviors.

Results: Of the 7116 study participants, 62.8% were females and 38.2% were males. The mean age of study participants was 35.3 years (SD 12.5). The overall prevalence of hypertension was 15.3% (16.4% for males and 14.4% for females). Twenty two percent of hypertensive participants were previously diagnosed. A logistic regression model revealed that age (AOR: 8.02, 95% CI: 5.63-11.42, p < 0.001), living in semi-urban area (AOR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.01-1.67, p = 0.040) alcohol consumption (AOR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.05-1.44, p = 0.009) and, raised BMI (AOR: 3.93, 95% CI: 2.54-6.08, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with hypertension. The risk of having hypertension was 2 times higher among obese respondents (AOR: 3.93, 95% CI: 2.54-6.08, p-value < 0.001) compared to those with normal BMI (AOR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.30-2.32, p-value < 0.001). Females (AOR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.63-0.88, p < 0.001) and students (AOR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.25-0.80, p = 0.007) were less likely to be hypertensive.

Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that the prevalence of hypertension is high in Rwanda, suggesting the need for prevention and control interventions aimed at decreasing the incidence taking into consideration the risk factors documented in this and other similar studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4536-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5504833PMC
July 2017
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