Publications by authors named "Jean-Philippe Chaput"

260 Publications

24-h Movement Guidelines and Substance Use among Adolescents: A School-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 23;18(6). Epub 2021 Mar 23.

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.

Children and youth are recommended to achieve at least 60 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, no more than 2 h/day of recreational screen time, and a sleep duration of 9-11 h/night for 11-13-year-olds or 8-10 h/night for 14-17-year-olds. Meeting the physical activity, screen time, and sleep duration recommendations have previously been associated with substance use among adolescents. However, previous research has mainly examined these factors individually rather than looking at how these indicators could concurrently relate to substance use in this age group. Therefore, this study examined the associations between meeting the 24-h movement guidelines for screen time, sleep duration, and physical activity (independent variables) with substance use outcomes including alcohol consumption, cannabis use, and cigarette smoking (dependent variables) among adolescents. Self-reported data from a cross-sectional and representative sample of 10,236 students (mean age = 15.1 years) in Ontario, Canada were analyzed. Logistic regression models stratified by gender were adjusted for potential confounders. Combinations of 24-h movement guidelines was differentially associated with substance use in boys and girls. Overall, findings showed that meeting 24-h movement guidelines is associated with lower odds of alcohol consumption, cannabis use, and cigarette smoking differentially with type of recommendation met and gender. Given that the associations between 24-h movement guidelines and substance use differ between boys and girls, future efforts should take this into consideration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063309DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8004679PMC
March 2021

Associations between Sociodemographic, Dietary, and Substance Use Factors with Self-Reported 24-Hour Movement Behaviors in a Sample of Brazilian Adolescents.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 4;18(5). Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Núcleo de Pesquisa em Atividade Física e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil.

We aimed to identify sociodemographic, dietary, and substance use factors associated with self-reported sleep duration, physical activity (PA), and sedentary behavior (SB) indicators in a sample of Brazilian adolescents. Adolescents ( = 731, 51% female, mean age: 16.4 years) answered a questionnaire. The volume of total PA, sports, non-sports, total SB, leisure-time SB, involuntary SB, sleep duration, dietary behaviors, sociodemographic, and substance use indicators were self-reported. Multilevel linear models were fitted. Females engaged in less total PA, sports, total SB, and leisure-time SB, but in more involuntary SB than males. Age was positively associated with non-sports and involuntary SB. Socioeconomic status was positively associated with total PA. Adolescents who lived with the mother only practiced more sports compared to those living with two parents. Unprocessed food was positively associated with total PA and sports. Processed food was inversely associated with total PA and non-sports, and positively associated with total SB and leisure-time SB. Alcohol use was positively associated with total PA, and tobacco smoking was negatively associated with total PA. No associations were observed for sleep duration. In conclusion, sociodemographic, dietary, and substance use factors are associated with the 24 h movement behaviors among Brazilian adolescents, and some associations are type specific.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052527DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967640PMC
March 2021

Effects of Classroom Active Desks on Children and Adolescents' Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, Academic Achievements and Overall Health: A Systematic Review.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 10;18(6). Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Auvergne Research Center for Human Nutrition (CRNH), 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France.

The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effects of active desks in the school setting on sedentary behavior, physical activity, academic achievements and overall health among children and adolescents aged 5-17 years. A systematic literature search was conducted using five databases until October 2020. Twenty-three studies were included. Studies reported an increase of around 36% in energy expenditure for cycling desks and between 15% and 27.7% for upright active desks. Children increased inhibitory control and selective attention capacity while using cycling desks. A heterogeneous quality of design and of results were observed limiting comparisons and conclusions for each active desk. Despite the lack of strong methodology for the included studies, active desks appear to be a promising intervention in classrooms to improve health-related outcomes in children aged 5-17 years. Due to weak methodology, future studies with stronger study designs and methodology are needed to better inform policy and practice about the role of classroom active desks on health-related outcomes in children and adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7999033PMC
March 2021

Toward a Romanian version of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R21 for children and adolescents (CTFEQ-R21): Preliminary psychometric analysis and relation with body composition.

J Mother Child 2021 Jan 29;23(1):45-53. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P EA 3533), University of Blaise Pascal in Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont Auvergne University, CRNH-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a Romanian version of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R21 for children and adolescents CTFEQ-R21 and to assess its psychometrie properties and factor structure. Associations between the present version of the CTFEQ-R21 and anthropometric measures as well as body composition were also examined.

Material And Methods: 153 children and adolescents (68 boys and 95 girls; 10.8±3.5 years) took part in this study (BMI of 17.7±3. 1kg/m). The participants were fitst interviewed to ascertain their understanding of the CTFEQ-R21 and were then asked to self-complete the questionnaire. Height and weight were measured and body composition assessed using bio impedance analyzers (Tanita MC 780).

Results: The CTFEQ-R21 showed satisfactory interna/ consistency (Cronbach's a=0.78). Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.55 for CR (cognitive restriction), 0.75 for UE (Uncontrolled Eating), and 0.76 for EE (Emotional Eating) separately. UE and EE were found to be significantly correlated (r=0.54, p<0.05). The three factors explained 43% of the toto/ variance. Correlation between CR, UE and EE with body weight, BMI and FFM were significant but low to moderate, with coefficients ranging from 0.20 to 0.37. The higher the CR, UE and EE tertiles, the higher the weight, fat mass (kg) and fat-free mass values.

Conclusions: According to the psychometrie analysis of the questionnaire, the version of the CTFEQ-R21 proposed here is a satisfactory tool to assess eating behaviors in the Romanian child population that remains to be further developed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34763/devperiodmed.20192301.4553DOI Listing
January 2021

Effect of Acute Exercise and Cycling Desk on Energy Intake and Appetite Response to Mental Work: The CORTEX Study.

J Phys Act Health 2021 Mar 3;18(4):433-439. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Background: While mental work has been shown to favor overconsumption, the present study compared the effect of a cognitive task alone, followed by acute exercise, or performed on a cycling desk, on short-term food intake and appetite in adults.

Methods: A total of 19 normal-weight adults randomly completed: resting session (CON), 30-minute cognitive task (CT), 30-minute cognitive task followed by a 15-minute high-intensity interval exercise bout (CT-EX), and 30-minute cognitive task performed on a cycling desk (CT-CD). Energy expenditure was estimated (heart rate-workload relationship), and energy intake (EI; ad libitum) and appetite (visual analog scales) were assessed.

Results: Energy expenditure was higher in CT-EX (P < .001) compared with the other conditions and in CT-CD compared with CON and CT (P < .01). EI was higher in CON (P < .05) and CT-CD compared with CT (P < .01). Relative EI was higher in CON compared with CT (P < .05) and lower in CT-EX compared with CT, CT-CD, and CON (all Ps < .001). Area under the curve desire to eat was higher in CON compared with CT (P < .05) and CT-EX (P < .01). Area under the curve prospective food consumption was higher in CON compared with CT-EX (P < .01). Overall composite appetite score was not different between conditions.

Conclusion: While cycling desks are recommended to break up sedentary time, the induced increase in energy expenditure might not be enough to significantly reduce overall short-term relative EI after mental work.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2020-0342DOI Listing
March 2021

Prevalence and Correlates of Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines Among Colombian Children and Adolescents.

J Phys Act Health 2021 Mar 3;18(4):400-417. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Background: Global estimates have shown that a small proportion of children and adolescents are physically active. However, the evidence on physical activity (PA) among Colombian children and adolescents is limited. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence and correlates of meeting PA guidelines among Colombian children and adolescents.

Methods: Data were collected as part of the National Survey of Nutrition 2015. A national sample of 16,612 children and adolescents (3-17 y) was included. Prevalence estimates of meeting PA and active play guidelines were calculated, and Poisson regression models were conducted to identify correlates of PA.

Results: Low proportion of Colombian children and adolescents met the PA guidelines. Low engagement in active play was observed among preschoolers. Correlates varied by age group. Female sex was a consistent negative correlate of meeting PA guidelines across all age groups.

Conclusions: Urgent actions are needed to promote active play and PA among Colombian children and adolescents. The correlates identified in our study can help inform the development of actions to overcome the disparities and provide opportunities for children to achieve their full potential for healthy growth and development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2020-0568DOI Listing
March 2021

First sleep health guidelines for Canadian adults: implications for clinicians.

Sleep Med 2021 Mar 12;79:117-118. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Département de psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Centre d'étude avancée en médecine du sommeil, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2021.01.012DOI Listing
March 2021

Association between physical activity, screen time activities, diet patterns and daytime sleepiness in a sample of Brazilian adolescents.

Sleep Med 2021 Feb 8;78:1-6. Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Núcleo de Pesquisa em Atividade Física e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.

Objective: To examine the association between physical activity, screen time, eating habits and daytime sleepiness among Brazilian adolescents.

Methods: Adolescents from three high schools (n = 876, 49.8% female, 16.4 ± 1.2 years) participated in this cross-sectional survey. Variables related to lifestyle behaviors (ie, physical activity, screen time, eating habits, sleep duration) were collected through an online questionnaire. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS). Excessive daytime sleepiness was defined as a PDSS score ≥20.

Results: The average PDSS score was 18.9 (SD ± 4.8) points and 46.8% of adolescents were classified as having excessive daytime sleepiness. Physical activity was inversely associated with PDSS score (β = -0.29, 95% CI -0.47; -0.11). Consuming processed foods frequently (β = 1.16, 95% CI 0.85; 1.47) and using social media (β = 0.22, 95% CI 0.14; 0.30) were positively associated with PDSS score. Similar findings were observed for the odds of excessive daytime sleepiness. Physical activity was inversely associated (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84; 0.99), while frequent consumption of processed foods (OR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.33; 1.82) and using social media (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.02; 1.24) were positively associated with excessive daytime sleepiness.

Conclusions: Lower physical activity level, a higher consumption processed foods, and higher social media use were associated with daytime sleepiness in this sample of Brazilian adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.12.004DOI Listing
February 2021

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines and Psychological Distress among Adolescents: Les Directives canadiennes en matière de mouvement sur 24 heures et la détresse psychologique chez les adolescents.

Can J Psychiatry 2020 Nov 27:706743720970863. Epub 2020 Nov 27.

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, 6363University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth recommend at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day, 2 hours or less of recreational screen time per day, and 9 to 11 hours of sleep per night for 5 to 13 years old and 8 to 10 hours per night for 14 to 17 years old. This study examined the association between meeting these guidelines and psychological distress among adolescents.

Methods: The present cross-sectional sample included 6,364 students aged 11 to 20 years from the 2017 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. This provincially representative school-based survey is based on a 2-stage cluster design. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was first conducted to confirm the factor structure of the K6, and structural equation modeling adjusted for age, sex, ethnoracial background, subjective socioeconomic status, and body mass index -score was used to investigate the association between meeting the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines and K6 factors among adolescents.

Results: The CFA demonstrated that a 2-factor model (representing anxiety and depressive symptoms) of the K6 fit the data well. The anxiety and depression items demonstrated a composite reliability (Cronbach's α) of 0.86 and 0.83, respectively, indicating a high level of internal consistency. Compared to meeting none of the recommendations, meeting all 3 movement behavior recommendations was associated with lower anxiety (β = -0.076; = 0.028) and depressive symptoms (β = -0.067; = 0.028). Meeting the screen time + sleep duration recommendations had the strongest association with anxiety (β = -0.157; < 0.001) and depressive symptoms (β = -0.139; < 0.001), followed by meeting the sleep duration recommendation only for both anxiety (β = -0.135; < 0.001) and depressive symptoms (β = -0.106; < 0.001).

Conclusions: Meeting the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines was associated with lower anxiety and depressive symptoms among adolescents, and these associations appear mainly driven by meeting the sleep duration recommendation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0706743720970863DOI Listing
November 2020

World Health Organization 2020 guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour.

Br J Sports Med 2020 Dec;54(24):1451-1462

Physical Activity Unit, Department of Health Promotion, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Objectives: To describe new WHO 2020 guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour.

Methods: The guidelines were developed in accordance with WHO protocols. An expert Guideline Development Group reviewed evidence to assess associations between physical activity and sedentary behaviour for an agreed set of health outcomes and population groups. The assessment used and systematically updated recent relevant systematic reviews; new primary reviews addressed additional health outcomes or subpopulations.

Results: The new guidelines address children, adolescents, adults, older adults and include new specific recommendations for pregnant and postpartum women and people living with chronic conditions or disability. All adults should undertake 150-300 min of moderate-intensity, or 75-150 min of vigorous-intensity physical activity, or some equivalent combination of moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, per week. Among children and adolescents, an average of 60 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity across the week provides health benefits. The guidelines recommend regular muscle-strengthening activity for all age groups. Additionally, reducing sedentary behaviours is recommended across all age groups and abilities, although evidence was insufficient to quantify a sedentary behaviour threshold.

Conclusion: These 2020 WHO guidelines update previous WHO recommendations released in 2010. They reaffirm messages that some physical activity is better than none, that more physical activity is better for optimal health outcomes and provide a new recommendation on reducing sedentary behaviours. These guidelines highlight the importance of regularly undertaking both aerobic and muscle strengthening activities and for the first time, there are specific recommendations for specific populations including for pregnant and postpartum women and people living with chronic conditions or disability. These guidelines should be used to inform national health policies aligned with the and to strengthen surveillance systems that track progress towards national and global targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2020-102955DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7719906PMC
December 2020

Advancing the global physical activity agenda: recommendations for future research by the 2020 WHO physical activity and sedentary behavior guidelines development group.

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 2020 11 26;17(1):143. Epub 2020 Nov 26.

Physical Activity Unit, Department of Health Promotion, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: In July, 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) commenced work to update the 2010 Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for Health and established a Guideline Development Group (GDG) comprising expert public health scientists and practitioners to inform the drafting of the 2020 Guidelines on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior. The overall task of the GDG was to review the scientific evidence and provide expert advice to the WHO on the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with optimal health in children and adolescents, adults, older adults (> 64 years), and also specifically in pregnant and postpartum women and people living with chronic conditions or disabilities.

Methods: The GDG reviewed the available evidence specific to each sub-population using systematic protocols and in doing so, identified a number of gaps in the existing literature. These proposed research gaps were discussed and verified by expert consensus among the entire GDG.

Results: Evidence gaps across population sub-groups included a lack of information on: 1) the precise shape of the dose-response curve between physical activity and/or sedentary behavior and several of the health outcomes studied; 2) the health benefits of light-intensity physical activity and of breaking up sedentary time with light-intensity activity; 3) differences in the health effects of different types and domains of physical activity (leisure-time; occupational; transportation; household; education) and of sedentary behavior (occupational; screen time; television viewing); and 4) the joint association between physical activity and sedentary time with health outcomes across the life course. In addition, we acknowledge the need to conduct more population-based studies in low- and middle-income countries and in people living with disabilities and/or chronic disease, and to identify how various sociodemographic factors (age, sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status) modify the health effects of physical activity, in order to address global health disparities.

Conclusions: Although the 2020 WHO Guidelines for Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior were informed by the most up-to-date research on the health effects of physical activity and sedentary time, there is still substantial work to be done in advancing the global physical activity agenda.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-01042-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7690200PMC
November 2020

2020 WHO guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour for children and adolescents aged 5-17 years: summary of the evidence.

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 2020 11 26;17(1):141. Epub 2020 Nov 26.

Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) released in 2020 updated global guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour for children, adolescents, adults, older adults and sub-populations such as pregnant and postpartum women and those living with chronic conditions or disabilities.

Objective: To summarize the evidence on the associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and health-related outcomes used to inform the 2020 WHO guidelines on physical activity and sedentary behaviour for children and adolescents aged 5-17 years.

Methods: The update of the WHO guideline recommendations for children and adolescents utilized and systematically updated the evidence syntheses on physical activity and sedentary behaviour conducted for the 2016 Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth, the 2019 Australian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Young People (5-17 years), and the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, Second Edition. Systematic reviews published from 2017 up to July 2019 that addressed the key questions were identified, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) framework was used to rate the certainty of the evidence for the entire body of evidence.

Results: The updated literature search yielded 21 relevant systematic reviews. The evidence base reviewed (i.e., existing and new systematic reviews) provided evidence that greater amounts and higher intensities of physical activity as well as different types of physical activity (i.e., aerobic and muscle and bone strengthening activities) are associated with improved health outcomes (primarily intermediate outcomes). There was sufficient evidence to support recommendations on limiting sedentary behaviours, which was not addressed in the 2010 WHO guidelines. However, there is still insufficient evidence available to fully describe the dose-response relationships between physical activity or sedentary behaviour and health outcomes, and whether the associations vary by type or domain of physical activity or sedentary behaviour.

Conclusions: Addressing the identified research gaps will better inform guideline recommendations in children and adolescents, and future work should aim to prioritize these areas of research. In the meantime, investment and leadership is needed to scale up known effective policies and programs aimed at increasing activity in children and adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-01037-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7691077PMC
November 2020

24-Hour Movement Behaviors and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors Among Youth.

J Adolesc Health 2020 Oct 14. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose: The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (≥60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day, ≤2 hours of recreational screen time per day, and 9-11 hours of sleep per night for 5-13 years old) are associated with better physical health, but less is known about how these behaviors are related to mental health. This study examined the association of meeting these guideline recommendations with internalizing and externalizing behaviors among youth.

Methods: A large and broadly representative cross-sectional sample of 9- to 11-year-old U.S. youth (N = 11,875) from the Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development study was analyzed. Internalizing and externalizing behaviors were measured using the Child Behaviour Checklist. Associations were examined using negative binomial regression adjusted for several confounders.

Results: Compared to meeting none of the recommendations, meeting recommendations for screen time and sleep but not physical activity was associated with a lower prevalence ratio of total, internalizing, and externalizing behaviors. Meeting two or all three recommendations was more strongly associated with these outcomes than meeting one recommendation or none. The prevalence ratio of the group meeting all three recommendations was .77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: .68-.86) for total problem scores, .78 (95% CI: .68-.89) for internalizing problem scores, and .79 (95% CI: .68-.91) for externalizing problem scores.

Conclusions: Meeting the 24-hour movement guidelines was associated with a lower risk of internalizing and externalizing behaviors in youth. These associations were mainly explained by meeting the screen time and sleep duration recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2020.09.003DOI Listing
October 2020

A systematic review of compositional data analysis studies examining associations between sleep, sedentary behaviour, and physical activity with health outcomes in adults.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S248-S257

School of Health and Life Science, Glasgow Caledonia University, Glasgow, G4 0BA, Scotland.

This systematic review determined if the composition of time spent in movement behaviours (i.e., sleep, sedentary behaviour (SED), light physical activity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) is associated with health in adults. Five electronic databases were searched in August 2019. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were peer-reviewed, examined community-dwelling adults, and used compositional data analysis to examine the associations between the composition of time spent in movement behaviours and health outcomes. Eight studies (7 cross-sectional, 1 prospective cohort) of >12 000 unique participants were included. Findings indicated that the 24-h movement behaviour composition was associated with all-cause mortality (1 of 1 analyses), adiposity (4 of 4 analyses), and cardiometabolic biomarkers (8 of 15 analyses). Reallocating time into MVPA from other movement behaviours was associated with favourable changes to most health outcomes and taking time out of SED and reallocating it into other movement behaviours was associated with favourable changes to all-cause mortality. The quality of evidence was very low for all health outcomes. In conclusion, these findings support the notion that the composition of movement across the entire 24-h day matters, and that recommendations for sleep, SED, and physical activity should be combined into a single public health guideline. (PROSPERO registration no.: CRD42019121641.) The 24-h movement behaviour composition is associated with a variety of health outcomes. Reallocating time into MVPA is favourably associated with health. Reallocating time out of SED is associated with favourable changes to mortality risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0160DOI Listing
October 2020

Sedentary behaviour and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S197-S217

School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Herson, QLD 4006, Australia.

The purpose of this overview of systematic reviews was to determine the relationship between different types and patterns of sedentary behaviour and selected health outcomes in adults and older adults. Five electronic databases were last searched in May, 2019, with a 10-year search limit. Included reviews met the a priori population (community-dwelling adults aged 18 years and older), intervention/exposure/comparator (various types and/or patterns of sedentary behaviour), and outcomes criteria. Eighteen systematic reviews were included in the evidence synthesis. High levels of sedentary behaviour are unfavourably associated with cognitive function, depression, function and disability, physical activity levels, and physical health-related quality of life in adults. Reducing or breaking up sedentary behaviour may benefit body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Total sedentary behaviour and TV viewing were most consistently associated with unfavourable health outcomes, while computer and Internet use may be favourably associated with cognitive function for older adults. The quality of evidence within individual reviews (as assessed by review authors) varied from low to high, while the certainty of evidence was low to very low. These findings have important public health implications, suggesting that adults should avoid high levels of sedentary behaviour and break-up periods of prolonged sitting. (PROSPERO registration nos.: CRD42019123121 and CRD42019127157.) High levels of sedentary behaviour are unfavourably associated with important health outcomes in adults. Reducing or breaking up sedentary behaviour may benefit body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Computer and Internet use may be favourably associated with cognitive function in older adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0272DOI Listing
October 2020

Sleep timing, sleep consistency, and health in adults: a systematic review.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S232-S247

Départment de psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC H2V 2S9, Canada.

The objective of this systematic review was to examine the associations between sleep timing (e.g., bedtime/wake-up time, midpoint of sleep), sleep consistency/regularity (e.g., intra-individual variability in sleep duration, social jetlag, catch-up sleep), and health outcomes in adults aged 18 years and older. Four electronic databases were searched in December 2018 for articles published in the previous 10 years. Fourteen health outcomes were examined. A total of 41 articles, including 92 340 unique participants from 14 countries, met inclusion criteria. Sleep was assessed objectively in 37% of studies and subjectively in 63% of studies. Findings suggest that later sleep timing and greater sleep variability were generally associated with adverse health outcomes. However, because most studies reported linear associations, it was not possible to identify thresholds for "late sleep timing" or "large sleep variability". In addition, social jetlag was associated with adverse health outcomes, while weekend catch-up sleep was associated with better health outcomes. The quality of evidence ranged from "very low" to "moderate" across study designs and health outcomes using GRADE. In conclusion, the available evidence supports that earlier sleep timing and regularity in sleep patterns with consistent bedtimes and wake-up times are favourably associated with health. (PROSPERO registration no.: CRD42019119534.) This is the first systematic review to examine the influence of sleep timing and sleep consistency on health outcomes. Later sleep timing and greater variability in sleep are both associated with adverse health outcomes in adults. Regularity in sleep patterns with consistent bedtimes and wake-up times should be encouraged.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0032DOI Listing
October 2020

Sleep duration and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S218-S231

Départment de psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC H2V 2S9, Canada.

The objective of this overview of systematic reviews was to examine the associations between sleep duration and health outcomes in adults. Four electronic databases were searched in December 2018 for systematic reviews published in the previous 10 years. Included reviews met the a priori determined population (community-dwelling adults aged 18 years and older), intervention/exposure/comparator (various levels of sleep duration), and outcome criteria (14 outcomes examined). To avoid overlap in primary studies, we used a priority list to choose a single review per outcome; reviews that examined the effect of age and those that looked at dose-response were prioritized. A total of 36 systematic reviews were eligible and 11 were included. Reviews included comprised 4 437 101 unique participants from 30 countries. Sleep duration was assessed subjectively in 96% of studies and 78% of studies in the reviews were prospective cohort studies. The dose-response curves showed that the sleep duration that was most favourably associated with health was 7-8 h per day. Modification of the effect by age was not apparent. The quality of the evidence ranged from low to high across health outcomes. In conclusion, the available evidence suggests that a sleep duration of 7-8 h per day is the one most favourably associated with health among adults and older adults. (PROSPERO registration no.: CRD42019119529.) This is the first overview of reviews that examines the influence of sleep duration on a wide range of health outcomes in adults. Seven to 8 h of sleep per day was most favourably associated with health. Effect modification by age was not evident.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0034DOI Listing
October 2020

Development and application of an outcome-centric approach for conducting overviews of reviews.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S151-S164

School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada.

There are gaps in current guidance concerning how to conduct overviews of systematic reviews in an outcome-centric manner. Herein we summarize the methods and lessons learned from conducting 4 outcome-centric overviews to help inform the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18-64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older on the topics of resistance training, balance and functional training, sedentary behaviour, sleep duration. We defined "critical" and "important" outcomes a priori. We used AMSTAR 2 to assess review quality and sought 1 systematic review per outcome. If multiple reviews were required to address subgroups for an outcome, we calculated the corrected covered area (CCA) to quantify overlap. We report our methodology in a PRISMA table. Across the 4 overviews, authors reviewed 1110 full texts; 45 were retained (low to high quality per AMSTAR 2), representing 950 primary studies, enrolling over 5 385 500 participants. Of 46 outcomes, we identified data for 35. Nineteen outcomes required >1 review (CCA range: 0% to 71.4%). Our outcome-centric overviews addressed unique aspects of overviews, including selection and quality assessment of included reviews, and overlap. Lessons learned included consistent application of methodological principles to minimize bias and optimize reporting transparency. Overviews of reviews synthesize systematic reviews in a rigorous and transparent manner. Outcome-centric systematic reviews assess the quality of evidence for primary studies contributing to an outcome. This manuscript describes the development and application of extending the concept of outcome-centric systematic reviews to the design and conduct of outcome-centric overviews.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0564DOI Listing
October 2020

Resistance training and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S165-S179

Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada.

The objective of this overview of systematic reviews was to determine the benefits and harms of resistance training (RT) on health outcomes in adults aged 18 years or older, compared with not participating in RT. Four electronic databases were searched in February 2019 for systematic reviews published in the past 10 years. Eligibility criteria were determined a priori for population (community dwelling adults), intervention (exclusively RT), comparator (no RT or different doses of RT), and health outcomes (critical: mortality, physical functioning, health-related quality of life, and adverse events; important: cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mental health, brain health, cognitive function, cancer, fall-related injuries or falls, and bone health). We selected 1 review per outcome and we used the GRADE process to assess the strength of evidence. We screened 2089 records and 375 full-text articles independently, in duplicate. Eleven systematic reviews were included, representing 364 primary studies and 382 627 unique participants. RT was associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease incidence, and an improvement in physical functioning. Effects on health-related quality of life or cognitive function were less certain. Adverse events were not consistently monitored or reported in RT studies, but serious adverse events were not common. Systematic reviews for the remaining important health outcomes could not be identified. Overall, RT training improved health outcomes in adults and the benefits outweighed the harms. (PROSPERO registration no.: CRD42019121641.) This overview was required to inform whether there was new evidence to support changes to the recommended guidelines for resistance training.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0245DOI Listing
October 2020

Balance and functional training and health in adults: an overview of systematic reviews.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S180-S196

Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada.

This overview of systematic reviews examined the effect of balance and functional strength training on health outcomes in adults aged 18 years or older, to inform the Canadian 24-hour Movement Guidelines. Four electronic databases were searched for systematic reviews published between January 2009 and May 2019. Eligibility criteria were determined a priori for population (community-dwelling adults), intervention (balance and functional training), comparator (no intervention or different types/doses), and outcomes (critical: falls and fall-related injuries; adverse events; important: physical functioning and disability; health-related quality of life; physical activity; and sedentary behaviour). Two reviewers independently screened studies for eligibility and performed AMSTAR 2 assessment. One review was selected per outcome. Of 3288 records and 355 full-text articles, 5 systematic reviews were included, encompassing data from 15 890 participants in 23 countries. In adults 65 years and older, balance and functional training and Tai Chi reduced the rate of falls and the number of people who fell, and improved aspects of physical functioning and physical activity. The effect on health-related quality of life and falls requiring hospitalization was uncertain. While inconsistently monitored, only 1 serious adverse event was reported. No evidence was available in adults under age 65 years. Included systematic reviews and primary evidence reported by review authors ranged in quality. Overall, participation in balance and functional training reduced falls and improved health outcomes in adults 65 years of age and older. PROSPERO registration no.: CRD42019134865. This overview informs updated guidelines for balance training in adults. Balance and functional training reduced falls and improved health outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0279DOI Listing
October 2020

Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18-64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older: an integration of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep.

Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 2020 Oct;45(10 (Suppl. 2)):S57-S102

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L1, Canada.

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology assembled a Consensus Panel representing national organizations, content experts, methodologists, stakeholders, and end-users and followed an established guideline development procedure to create the . These guidelines underscore the importance of movement behaviours across the whole 24-h day. The development process followed the strategy outlined in the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. A large body of evidence was used to inform the guidelines including 2 de novo systematic reviews and 4 overviews of reviews examining the relationships among movement behaviours (physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, and all behaviours together) and several health outcomes. Draft guideline recommendations were discussed at a 4-day in-person Consensus Panel meeting. Feedback from stakeholders was obtained by survey ( = 877) and the draft guidelines were revised accordingly. The final guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for a healthy day (24-h), comprising a combination of sleep, sedentary behaviours, and light-intensity and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity. Dissemination and implementation efforts with corresponding evaluation plans are in place to help ensure that guideline awareness and use are optimized. First ever 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults aged 18-64 years and Adults aged 65 years or older with consideration of a balanced approach to physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep Finalizes the suite of 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Canadians across the lifespan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2020-0467DOI Listing
October 2020

Association between Lifestyle Behaviors and Health-Related Quality of Life in a Sample of Brazilian Adolescents.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 09 29;17(19). Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Núcleo de Pesquisa em Atividade Física e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil.

This study aimed to analyze the association between lifestyle behaviors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among Brazilian adolescents. We evaluated 739 adolescents (51.0% girls; mean age, 16.4 ± 1.0 years) from the mesoregion Grande Florianópolis, Brazil. Participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire and sex, age, mother's education, health-related quality of life, physical activity, screen time indicators, sleep duration, diet, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and drug experimentation were retrieved. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the Kidscreen-10 instrument. Measures of body mass and height were taken by trained researchers. Mixed-effects linear regression models were used. Self-reported health-related quality of life was higher in males (β = 3.68, 95%CI: 2.75; 4.61) compared to females, and no association was observed for age and mother's education level. Practicing sports (β = 1.19, 95%CI: 0.29; 2.08) was associated with better HRQoL, while processed food score (β = -0.45, 95%CI: -0.78; -0.13), working using screen devices for more than 4 h/day (β = -2.38, 95%CI: -4.52; -0.25), having experimented illicit drugs (β = -2.05, 95%CI: -3.20; -0.90), and sleeping less than 8 h/night (β = -1.35, 95%CI: -2.27; -0.43) were unfavorably associated with HRQoL. Non-sport physical activities, unprocessed food, studying, watching videos, playing videogames, using social media, alcohol drinking, and smoking were not associated with health-related quality of life. These findings suggest that promoting sports and adequate sleep, and preventing excessive workloads and the use of drugs among adolescents may be effective strategies to improve HRQoL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7579499PMC
September 2020

Prevalence and sociodemographic factors associated with meeting the 24-hour movement guidelines in a sample of Brazilian adolescents.

PLoS One 2020 28;15(9):e0239833. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Research Group in Physical Activity and Health, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.

Background: The present cross-sectional study aimed to determine the proportion of adolescents meeting the 24-hour movement guidelines, and investigate sociodemographic factors associated with meeting them.

Methods: Self-reported (average daily volume of MVPA, sleep duration, and time watching videos and playing videogames) and accelerometer-measured (MVPA and sleep duration) 24-hour movement behaviors were classified according to recommendations, and sex, age, socioeconomic status (SES), family structure, parental education, and number of people in the household were tested as correlates of meeting recommendations using multilevel logistic regressions.

Results: The proportion of adolescents (n = 867, mean age: 16.4 years, 50.3% girls) meeting the MVPA, ST, and sleep duration guidelines was of 25%, 28%, and 41%, respectively, for self-reported data. From accelerometer data (n = 688), 7.1% met MVPA and 31.7% met sleep duration recommendations. Adherence to all three recommendations was 3% with self-report and 0.2% with accelerometer data. Boys were more likely to meet MVPA, but not ST and sleep-duration recommendations. A positive relationship was observed between age and meeting the ST recommendation.

Conclusions: Adherence to the sleep duration recommendation was higher than to the screen-time and MVPA recommendations and few in this sample of Brazilian adolescents achieved the 24-hour guidelines. Efforts are needed to improve 24-hour movement behaviors.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0239833PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7521749PMC
November 2020

Prevalence and sociodemographic factors associated with meeting the 24-hour movement guidelines in a sample of Brazilian adolescents.

PLoS One 2020 28;15(9):e0239833. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Research Group in Physical Activity and Health, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.

Background: The present cross-sectional study aimed to determine the proportion of adolescents meeting the 24-hour movement guidelines, and investigate sociodemographic factors associated with meeting them.

Methods: Self-reported (average daily volume of MVPA, sleep duration, and time watching videos and playing videogames) and accelerometer-measured (MVPA and sleep duration) 24-hour movement behaviors were classified according to recommendations, and sex, age, socioeconomic status (SES), family structure, parental education, and number of people in the household were tested as correlates of meeting recommendations using multilevel logistic regressions.

Results: The proportion of adolescents (n = 867, mean age: 16.4 years, 50.3% girls) meeting the MVPA, ST, and sleep duration guidelines was of 25%, 28%, and 41%, respectively, for self-reported data. From accelerometer data (n = 688), 7.1% met MVPA and 31.7% met sleep duration recommendations. Adherence to all three recommendations was 3% with self-report and 0.2% with accelerometer data. Boys were more likely to meet MVPA, but not ST and sleep-duration recommendations. A positive relationship was observed between age and meeting the ST recommendation.

Conclusions: Adherence to the sleep duration recommendation was higher than to the screen-time and MVPA recommendations and few in this sample of Brazilian adolescents achieved the 24-hour guidelines. Efforts are needed to improve 24-hour movement behaviors.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0239833PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7521749PMC
November 2020

Results From the 2019 ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Adults.

J Phys Act Health 2020 Sep 3:1-8. Epub 2020 Sep 3.

Background: The ParticipACTION Report Card on Physical Activity for Adults is a knowledge exchange tool representing a synthesis of the literature and data available at the national level. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of the inaugural 2019 edition.

Methods: Thirteen physical activity indicators, grouped into 4 categories, were graded by a committee of experts using a process that was informed by the best available evidence. Sources included national surveys, peer-reviewed literature, and gray literature such as government and nongovernment reports and online content.

Results: Grades were assigned to Daily Behaviors (overall physical activity: D; daily movement: C; moderate to vigorous physical activity: F; muscle and bone strength: INC; balance: INC; sedentary behavior: INC; sleep: B-), Individual Characteristics (intentions: B+), Settings and Sources of Influence (social support: INC; workplace: INC; community and environment: B-; health and primary care settings: C-), and Strategies and Investments (government: B-).

Conclusions: Generally, lower grades were given to behavior-related indicators (eg, overall physical activity) and better grades for indicators related to investments, community supports, and strategies and policies. Research gaps and future recommendations and directions are identified for each indicator to support future practice, policy, and research directions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2019-0646DOI Listing
September 2020

Movement behaviors and their association with depressive symptoms in Brazilian adolescents: A cross-sectional study.

J Sport Health Sci 2020 Aug 11. Epub 2020 Aug 11.

Research Centre in Physical Activity and Health, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, 88040-900, Brazil.

Background: Physical activity, sleep, and sedentary behaviors compose 24-h movement behaviors and have been independently associated with depressive symptoms. However, it is not clear whether it is the movement behavior itself or other contextual factors that are related to depressive symptoms. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations between self-reported and accelerometer-measured movement behaviors and depressive symptoms in adolescents.

Methods: Cross-sectional data from 610 adolescents (14-18 years old) were used. Adolescents answered questions from the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale and reported time spent watching videos, playing videogames, using social media, time spent in various physical activities, and daytime sleepiness. Wrist-worn accelerometers were used to measure sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sedentary time, and physical activity. Mixed-effects logistic regressions were used.

Results: Almost half of the adolescents (48%) were classified as being at high risk for depression (score ≥20). No significant associations were found between depressive symptoms and accelerometer-measured movement behaviors, self-reported non-sport physical activity, watching videos, and playing videogames. However, higher levels of self-reported total physical activity (odd ratio (OR) = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86-0.98) and volume of sports (OR = 0.88, 95%CI: 0.79-0.97), in minutes, were associated with a lower risk of depression, while using social media for either 2.0-3.9 h/day (OR = 1.77, 95%CI: 1.58-2.70) or ≥4.0 h/day (OR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.10-2.54), as well as higher levels of daytime sleepiness (OR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.12-1.22), were associated with a higher risk of depression.

Conclusions: What adolescents do when they are active or sedentary may be more important than the time spent in the movement behaviors because it relates to depressive symptoms. Targeting daytime sleepiness, promoting sports, and limiting social media use may benefit adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jshs.2020.08.003DOI Listing
August 2020

Associations between the Canadian 24 h movement guidelines and different types of bullying involvement among adolescents.

Child Abuse Negl 2020 Oct 28;108:104638. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Background: The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth recommend ≥60 min of physical activity per day, ≤2 h of recreational screen time per day, and 9-11 hours of sleep per night for 11-13 years old and 8-10 hours per night for 14-17 years old.

Objective: This study examined the association between combinations of these recommendations and school bullying and cyberbullying victimization and perpetration among adolescents.

Participants And Setting: A total of 5615 Canadian students (mean age = 15.2 years) who participated in the 2017 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS) self-reported their physical activity, screen time, sleep duration, and their involvement in bullying.

Methods: Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for important covariates.

Results: Meeting the screen time recommendation alone was associated with lower odds of being a victim (OR: 0.64; 95 % CI: 0.46-0.88) or a bully (OR: 0.64; 95 % CI: 0.43-0.96) at school and a victim of cyberbullying (OR: 0.67; 95 % CI: 0.49-0.91). Meeting both the screen time and sleep duration recommendations was associated with lower odds of being a bully (OR: 0.51; 95 % CI: 0.30-0.88). Meeting all 3 recommendations showed stronger associations (i.e. lowest risk) with being a victim of school bullying (OR: 0.32; 95 % CI: 0.19-0.54), a bully-victim (OR: 0.25; 95 % CI: 0.08-0.78) or a victim of cyberbullying (OR: 0.37; 95 % CI: 0.17-0.84).

Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence that meeting the 24 -h movement guidelines is associated with lower odds of bullying involvement. Encouraging adherence to the 24 -h movement guidelines could be a good behavioural target to prevent involvement in both school bullying and cyberbullying.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2020.104638DOI Listing
October 2020

Physical activity, screen time and sleep duration: Combined associations with psychosocial health among Canadian children and youth.

Health Rep 2020 07;31(5):9-16

Centre for Surveillance and Applied Research, Public Health Agency of Canada, and Division of Cardiac Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario.

Background: Canada recently adopted the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (24-Hour Guidelines) for young people aged 5 to 17 years-an international first, providing integrated recommendations for physical activity, sedentary time and sleep. Since the release of the guidelines, very few studies have examined the associations of adherence to the 24-Hour Guidelines with health outcomes-and none focus on psychosocial health. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the associations of meeting the 24-Hour Guidelines and their behaviour-specific recommendations with psychosocial health among Canadian children and youth.

Data And Methods: This cross-sectional study included 4,250 children and youth aged 5 to 17 years with valid accelerometer data. The study data were collected from 2009 to 2015 with the Canadian Health Measures Survey and pooled. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was measured using accelerometers; screen time, sleep duration and measures of psychosocial health were self- or proxy-reported. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the associations of meeting individual or different combined recommendations from the 24-Hour Guidelines with psychosocial health.

Results: There was low overall adherence to all three 24-Hour Guidelines recommendations, especially among youth (children: 13.9%, youth: 4.8%). Meeting two or more of the recommendations was associated with higher odds of positive psychosocial health among youth (odds ratio [OR] = 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-8.19). Sleep duration and screen time were strongly associated with social behaviour and psychosocial health among Canadian youth.

Discussion: Adherence to the 24-Hour Guidelines was significantly associated with better psychosocial health among Canadian youth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25318/82-003-x202000500002-engDOI Listing
July 2020

Development of a consensus statement on the role of the family in the physical activity, sedentary, and sleep behaviours of children and youth.

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 2020 06 16;17(1):74. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L1, Canada.

Background: Children and youth who meet the physical activity, sedentary, and sleep behaviour recommendations in the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines are more likely to have desirable physical and psychosocial health outcomes. Yet, few children and youth actually meet the recommendations. The family is a key source of influence that can affect lifestyle behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process used to develop the Consensus Statement on the Role of the Family in the Physical Activity, Sedentary, and Sleep Behaviours of Children and Youth (0-17 years) and present, explain, substantiate, and discuss the final Consensus Statement.

Methods: The development of the Consensus Statement included the establishment of a multidisciplinary Expert Panel, completion of six reviews (three literature, two scoping, one systematic review of reviews), custom data analyses of Statistics Canada's Canadian Health Measures Survey, integration of related research identified by Expert Panel members, a stakeholder consultation, establishment of consensus, and the development of a media, public relations, communications and launch plan.

Results: Evidence from the literature reviews provided substantial support for the importance of family on children's movement behaviours and highlighted the importance of inclusion of the entire family system as a source of influence and promotion of healthy child and youth movement behaviours. The Expert Panel incorporated the collective evidence from all reviews, the custom analyses, other related research identified, and stakeholder survey feedback, to develop a conceptual model and arrive at the Consensus Statement: Families can support children and youth in achieving healthy physical activity, sedentary and sleep behaviours by encouraging, facilitating, modelling, setting expectations and engaging in healthy movement behaviours with them. Other sources of influence are important (e.g., child care, school, health care, community, governments) and can support families in this pursuit.

Conclusion: Family is important for the support and promotion of healthy movement behaviours of children and youth. This Consensus Statement serves as a comprehensive, credible, and current synopsis of related evidence, recommendations, and resources for multiple stakeholders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00973-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7296673PMC
June 2020

Combinations of physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep duration and their associations with depressive symptoms and other mental health problems in children and adolescents: a systematic review.

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 2020 06 5;17(1):72. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, 600 Peter Morand Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario, K1G 5Z3, Canada.

Background: For optimal health benefits, the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (aged 5-17 years) recommend an achievement of high levels of physical activity (≥60 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity), low levels of sedentary behaviour (≤2 h of recreational screen time), and sufficient sleep (9-11 h for children or 8-10 h for adolescents) each day. The objective of this systematic review was to examine how combinations of physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep duration relate to depressive symptoms and other mental health indicators among children and adolescents.

Methods: Literature was obtained through searching Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and SportDiscus up to September 30, 2019. Peer-reviewed studies published in English or French were included if they met the following criteria: population (apparently healthy children and adolescents with a mean age of 5-17 years), intervention/exposure (combinations of physical activity, sedentary time, and sleep duration), and outcomes (depressive symptoms and other mental health indicators). A risk of bias assessment was completed for all included studies using the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) framework was used to assess the quality of evidence for each health indicator. Narrative syntheses were employed to describe the results due to high levels of heterogeneity across studies.

Results: A total of 13 cross-sectional studies comprised in 10 papers met inclusion criteria. Data across studies involved 115,540 children and adolescents from 12 countries. Overall, the findings indicated favourable associations between meeting all 3 recommendations and better mental health indicators among children and adolescents when compared with meeting none of the recommendations. There was evidence of a dose-response gradient between an increasing number of recommendations met and better mental health indicators. Meeting the screen time and sleep duration recommendations appeared to be associated with more mental health benefits than meeting the physical activity recommendation. The quality of evidence reviewed was "very low" according to GRADE.

Conclusions: The findings indicate favourable associations between meeting all 3 movement behaviour recommendations in the 24-h guidelines and better mental health indicators among children and adolescents. There is a clear need for high-quality studies that use robust measures of all movement behaviours and validated measures of mental health to increase our understanding in this topic area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00976-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7273653PMC
June 2020