Publications by authors named "Jean-Marc Tsang"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fast, multiplane line-scan confocal microscopy using axially distributed slits.

Biomed Opt Express 2021 Mar 9;12(3):1339-1350. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Mall, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

The inherent constraints on resolution, speed and field of view have hindered the development of high-speed, three-dimensional microscopy techniques over large scales. Here, we present a multiplane line-scan imaging strategy, which uses a series of axially distributed reflecting slits to probe different depths within a sample volume. Our technique enables the simultaneous imaging of an optically sectioned image stack with a single camera at frame rates of hundreds of hertz, without the need for axial scanning. We demonstrate the applicability of our system to monitor fast dynamics in biological samples by performing calcium imaging of neuronal activity in mouse brains and voltage imaging of cardiomyocytes in cardiac samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/BOE.417286DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7984773PMC
March 2021

Fast micron-scale 3D printing with a resonant-scanning two-photon microscope.

Addit Manuf 2019 Dec 9;30. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Department of Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

3D printing allows rapid fabrication of complex objects from digital designs. One 3D-printing process, direct laser writing, polymerises a light-sensitive material by steering a focused laser beam through the shape of the object to be created. The highest-resolution direct laser writing systems use a femtosecond laser, steered using mechanised stages or galvanometer-controlled mirrors, to effect two-photon polymerisation. Here we report a new high-resolution direct laser writing system that employs a resonant mirror scanner to achieve a significant increase in printing speed over current methods while maintaining resolution on the order of a micron. This printer is based on a software modification to a commercially available resonant-scanning two-photon microscope. We demonstrate the complete process chain from hardware configuration and control software to the printing of objects of approximately 400 × 400 × 350 μm, and validate performance with objective benchmarks. Released under an open-source license, this work makes micron-scale 3D printing available at little or no cost to the large community of two-photon microscope users, and paves the way toward widespread availability of precision-printed devices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2019.100887DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7450988PMC
December 2019

Fast hyperspectral phase and amplitude imaging in scattering tissue.

Opt Lett 2018 May;43(9):2058-2061

Hyperspectral imaging in scattering tissue generally suffers from low light collection efficiency. In this Letter, we propose a microscope based on Fourier transform spectroscopy and oblique back-illumination microscopy that provides hyperspectral phase and amplitude images of thick, scattering samples with high throughput. Images can be acquired at >0.1  Hz rates with spectral resolution better than 200  cm, over a wide spectral range of 450-1700 nm. Proof-of-principle demonstrations are presented with chorioallantoic membrane of a chick embryo, illustrating the possibility of high-resolution hemodynamics imaging in thick tissue, based on transmission contrast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.43.002058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8328793PMC
May 2018
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