Publications by authors named "Jean de Dieu Baziki"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

South-to-south mentoring as a vehicle for implementing sustainable health security in Africa.

One Health Outlook 2021 Oct 6;3(1):20. Epub 2021 Oct 6.

International Federation of Biosafety Associations (IFBA), Ottawa, Canada.

Background: While sustainability has become a universal precept in the development of global health security systems, supporting policies often lack mechanisms to drive policies into regular practice. 'On-paper' norms and regulations are to a great extent upheld by frontline workers who often lack the opportunity to communicate their first-hand experiences to decisionmakers; their role is an often overlooked, yet crucial, aspect of a sustainable global health security landscape. Initiatives and programs developing transdisciplinary professional skills support the increased bidirectional dialogue between these frontline workers and key policy- and decisionmakers which may sustainably narrow the gap between global health security policy design and implementation.

Methods: The International Federation of Biosafety Associations' (IFBA) Global Mentorship Program recruits biosafety and biosecurity champions across Africa to provide local peer mentorship to developing professionals in their geographic region. Mentors and mentees complete structured one year program cycles, where they are provided with written overviews of monthly discussion topics, and attend optional virtual interactive activities. Feedback from African participants of the 2019-2020 program cycle was collected using a virtual Exit Survey, where aspects of program impact and structure were assessed.

Results: Following its initial call for applications, the IFBA Global Mentorship Program received considerable interest from professionals across the African continent, particularly in East and North Africa. The pilot program cycle matched a total of 62 individuals from an array of professional disciplines across several regions, 40 of which were located on the African continent. The resulting mentorship pairs shared knowledge, skills, and experiences towards translating policy objectives to action on the front lines. Mentorship pairs embraced multidisciplinary approaches to harmonize health security strategies across the human and animal health sectors. South-to-South mentorship therefore provided mentees with locally relevant support critical to translation of best technical practices to local capacity and work.

Conclusion: The IFBA's South-to-South Global Mentorship Program has demonstrated its ability to form crucial links between frontline biosafety professionals, laboratory workers, and policy- and decision-makers across several implicated sectors. By supporting regionally relevant peer mentorship programs, the gap between health security policy development and implementation may be narrowed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42522-021-00050-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8492092PMC
October 2021

Development and Evaluation of Epitope-Blocking ELISA for Detection of Antibodies against Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia in Goat Sera.

Vet Sci 2019 Oct 18;6(4). Epub 2019 Oct 18.

Laboratoire Central Veterinaire, Laboratoire de Virologie, B.P. 206 Bingerville, Côte d'Ivoire.

Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been developed for the detection of antibodies against contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), the causative agent of which is subsp. (Mccp). The currently available commercial CCPP competitive ELISA (CCPP cELISA) kit produced and supplied by IDEXX Company (Westbrook, Maine, United States) is relatively expensive for most African laboratories. To address this issue and provide a variety of choices, a sensitive and specific blocking-ELISA (b-ELISA) test to detect antibodies against CCPP was developed. We describe the newly developed CCPP blocking-ELISA based on the blocking of an epitope of a monoclonal antibody (Mccp-25) by a positive serum sample against the Mccp protein coated on a plate. The Percentage Inhibition (PI) cut-off value for the CCPP b-ELISA was set at 50 using 466 CCPP negative and 84 CCPP positive small ruminant sera. Of the negative sera, 307 were obtained from the Botswana National Veterinary Laboratory (BNVL) and 159 from the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (FLI) Germany. The 84 positive sera samples came from experimentally vaccinated goats at the AU-PANVAC facility in Debre-Zeit, Ethiopia. The relative diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the CCPP b-ELISA was 93% and 88%, respectively. This test result indicated good correlation with that of the commercial CCPP cELISA by IDEXX Company (Westbrook, Maine, United States) with a Cohen's κ agreement of κ agreement of 0.85. The newly developed CCPP b-ELISA will be useful in the detection of antibodies for the diagnosis CCPP and for sero-surveillance during vaccination campaigns.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vetsci6040082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6958372PMC
October 2019

Molecular epidemiological update of Peste des Petits Ruminants virus (PPRV) in Ethiopia.

Vet Microbiol 2019 Aug 11;235:229-233. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Institute of Biotechnology, Addis Ababa University, P.O.Box 1176, Ethiopia.

Peste des Petits ruminants (PPR) is a devastating disease of small ruminants with high morbidity and mortality rates among susceptible animals. The disease is endemic in much of Africa, the Middle East and Asia and constitutes one of the major hurdles to the improvement of small-ruminant production in these countries. The causal agent of PPR, the Small Ruminant Morbillivirus (SRMV), previously known as PPR virus (PPRV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae. SRMV can be categorized into four genetically distinct lineages (I to IV). Suspicion of PPR was first reported in Ethiopia in 1977 and since then genetic characterization of circulating viruses has identified lineages III and IV in the country. This study was undertaken to provide an update on the molecular epidemiology of PPR in Ethiopia by analysing animal tissue samples collected between 2011 and 2017. PPR positive samples were identified in four regions of the country. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of fourteen RT-PCR positive amplicons revealed that all of the SRMV in the samples from 2010 to 2017 belong to sub-clade II of clade I of lineage IV. No lineage III viruses were identified.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.07.006DOI Listing
August 2019

Development and validation of an epitope-blocking ELISA using an anti-haemagglutinin monoclonal antibody for specific detection of antibodies in sheep and goat sera directed against peste des petits ruminants virus.

Arch Virol 2018 Jul 8;163(7):1745-1756. Epub 2018 Mar 8.

OIE Regional Representation for Africa, B.P. 2954, Bamako, Mali.

Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious and economically important disease affecting production of small ruminants (i.e., sheep and goats). Taking into consideration the lessons learnt from the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP), PPR is now targeted by the international veterinary community as the next animal disease to be eradicated. To support the African continental programme for the control of PPR, the Pan African Veterinary Vaccine Centre of the African Union (AU-PANVAC) is developing diagnostics tools. Here, we describe the development of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) that allows testing of a large number of samples for specific detection of antibodies directed against PPR virus in sheep and goat sera. The PPR bELISA uses an anti-haemagglutinin (H) monoclonal antibody (MAb) as a competitor antibody, and tests results are interpreted using the percentage of inhibition (PI) of MAb binding generated by the serum sample. PI values below or equal to 18% (PI ≤ 18%) are negative, PI values greater than or equal to 25% (PI ≥ 25%) are positive, and PI values greater than 18% and below 25% are doubtful. The diagnostic specificity (DSp) and diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) were found to be 100% and 93.74%, respectively. The H-based PPR-bELISA showed good correlation with the virus neutralization test (VNT), the gold standard test, with a kappa value of 0.947. The H-based PPR-bELISA is more specific than the commercial kit ID Screen® PPR Competition (N-based PPR-cELISA) from IDvet (France), but the commercial kit is slightly more sensitive than the H-based PPR-bELISA. The validation process also indicated good repeatability and reproducibility of the H-based PPR-bELISA, making this new test a suitable tool for the surveillance and sero-monitoring of the vaccination campaign.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-018-3782-1DOI Listing
July 2018
-->