Dr Jean Baptiste Kakoma, BMed Sc, MD, MMed/OG, PhD, AESM - University of Rwanda School of Public Health & University of Lubumbashi Schools of Medicine and Public Health, DR Congo - Emeritus Professor

Dr Jean Baptiste Kakoma

BMed Sc, MD, MMed/OG, PhD, AESM

University of Rwanda School of Public Health & University of Lubumbashi Schools of Medicine and Public Health, DR Congo

Emeritus Professor

Lubumbashi, Haut - Katanga | Congo, the Democratic Republic of the

Main Specialties: Obstetrics & Gynecology, Public Health

Additional Specialties: Epidemiology/Reproduction Health/Obstetrics & Gynecology/

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7680-4564

Dr Jean Baptiste Kakoma, BMed Sc, MD, MMed/OG, PhD, AESM - University of Rwanda School of Public Health & University of Lubumbashi Schools of Medicine and Public Health, DR Congo - Emeritus Professor

Dr Jean Baptiste Kakoma

BMed Sc, MD, MMed/OG, PhD, AESM

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Rwanda School of Public Health & University of Lubumbashi Schools of Medicine and Public Health, DR Congo - Lubumbashi, Haut - Katanga , Congo, the Democratic Republic of the

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr Jean Baptiste Kakoma’s Resume / CV

Education

Jul 1987
Intitute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp/Belgium
AESM
All-or-none law
Jul 1987
Catholic University of Louvain/Belgium
PhD
All-or-none law
Apr 1981
National University of Zaire /Kisangani DRC
MMed OB-GYN
With Honours
Apr 1981
National University of Zaire / Kisangani DRC
MMed OB-GYN
With Honours
Jul 1975
National University of Zaire /Kinshasa DRC
MD
With Honours
Jun 1968
Jean XXIII Lyceum /Kolwezi DRC
Greco-Latin Classical Humanities
Magna cum Laude

Publications

23Publications

605Reads

69Profile Views

69PubMed Central Citations

[Model predicting failure in surgical repair of obstetric vesicovaginal fistula].

Pan Afr Med J 2019 16;34:91. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Département de Gynécologie-Obstétrique, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Lubumbashi, Lubumbashi, République Démocratique du Congo.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2019.34.91.20547DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6945673PMC
January 2020

Respiratory health of dust-exposed Congolese coltan miners

Int Arch Occup Environ Health DOI 10.1007/s00420-018-1329-0

International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

Purpose In Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), informal coltan mining has been expanding amidst increased insecurity due to armed conflicts. We investigated the impact of occupational dust-exposure on the respiratory health of Congolese coltan miners. Methods In total, 441 Congolese workers participated in this study, including 199 informal coltan miners and 242 office workers (controls). Information on respiratory complaints was collected using two standardized questionnaires. Physical examination (vital signs, auscultation) and lung function test (Peak Flow meter) were performed. In addition, workplace airborne PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOC) concentrations were measured. Results Higher airborne PM2.5 (range 180–210 μg/m3) and VOC (range 1.4–2.3 μg/m3) levels were detected at coltan mining work stations as compared with control sites (19–44 and 0.5–0.8 μg/m3, respectively). All respiratory complaints and disorders were more prevalent in informal coltan miners than in controls. Additionally, a markedly lower mean PEFR was observed in coltan miners than in controls (347.93 ± 6.88 vs. 493.23 ± 67.38 L/min, respectively). Moreover, positive associations between informal coltan mining and almost all respiratory complaints were observed, except wheezing at effort and night cough. On the other hand, an inverse association was observed between lung function (PEFR) and PM2.5 exposure, between PEFR and VOC exposure, and also between PEFR and current smoking. Conclusions This study showed high prevalence of respiratory complaints in Congolese informal coltan miners, suggesting the necessity to implement efficient occupational safety measures and regulate this informal mining business. Keywords Informal coltan mining · Dust exposure · Lung function · Respiratory health

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June 2018
6 Reads

Preliminary study of seroprevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B infection in pregnant women in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Afr J Health Issues. 2018 Mar 27; 2(1): 9. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26875/ajhi212018xi

African Journal of Health Issues

Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, defined as positivity for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), remains a public health problem nationally and globally. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors for HBV infection in pregnant women in the city of Lubumbashi. Methods: Cross-sectional study of the 269 pregnant women received at Shalina Polyclinic in Lubumbashi. HBV screening was performed by the PCR technique (using the COBAS TaqMan 48 controller). The chi-square test and the calculation of the odds-ratios with 95% Confidence Intervals were used with the significance level set at p <0.05. Results: The mean age of pregnant women was 30.0 ± 5.34 years (range, 17 to 44 years). The majority of them were unemployed (98.51%) and married (99.25%). All pregnant women were unaware of their HBV serologic status and had not been vaccinated against HBV. Eighteen (6.69% [95% CI: 4.01-10.37%]) participants had HBsAg positive and four (1.48% [95% CI: 0.41-3.76%]) were HIV-positive. The highest prevalenc Results: The mean age of pregnant women was 30.0 ± 5.34 years (range, 17 to 44 years). The majority of them were unemployed (98.51%) and married (99.25%). All pregnant women were unaware of their HBV serologic status and had not been vaccinated against HBV. Eighteen (6.69% [95% CI: 4.01-10.37%]) participants had HBsAg positive and four (1.48% [95% CI: 0.41-3.76%]) were HIV-positive. The highest prevalence of hepatitis B was observed in the age group between 31-40 (10.53%), single (50%), women with paying occupation (25%) and diabetes mellitus (14.29%) and a history of surgery (14.29%) with no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). However, HBV was significantly higher in HIV-positive pregnant women, who presented a risk of nearly 9-fold higher (50% versus 6.04%; OR adjusted: 8.89 [1.04-76.09]) compared to HIV-negative pregnant women. Conclusion: Our study shows that hepatitis B is a public health problem among pregnant women in the city of Lubumbashi. The history of HIV infection is independently associated with HBV infection in this context. Keywords: hepatitis B disease; pregnant women; Lubumbashi, DRC; risk factors

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March 2018
6 Reads

[Risk factors for maternal and perinatal mortality among women undergoing cesarean section in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo II].

Pan Afr Med J 2017;26:208. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

Département de Gynécologie-Obstétrique, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Lubumbashi, République Démocratique du Congo.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2017.26.208.12148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5491714PMC
February 2018
14 Reads

Fistules obstétricales dans la province du Haut-Katanga, République Démocratique du Congo: à propos de 242 cas

Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;29:34. doi:10.11604/pamj.2018.29.34.14576

Pan African Medical Journal.

Obstetric fistulas are a major public health problem in poor countries. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic features of obstetric fistulas in northern Katanga province, Democratic Republic of the Congo. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of 242 patients with obstetric fistula living in northern Katanga province from September 2009 to December 2013. The parameters studied included maternal sociodemographic data, obstetric and neonatal parameters, specific features of the fistula as well as management approach and outcome. Variables were analyzed using Epi Info 7.1 software. Out of 242 patients with obstetric fistula, 229 (95%) patients delivered vaginally and among them 74.6% delivered at home. In 93,4% of cases the new-born died in the perinatal period. The average age of patients was 27.9 ± 10.3 years. One out of six patients had less than 20 years and in general almost 1 out of 2 patients had less than 25 years. Seven out of ten patients had a parity of less than 3 and the average parity was 2.5±2.0. Ninety percent of patients had a low educational level and 95% lived alone. The patients had, on average, a history of fistula of more than 4.7±4.4 years, it was a vesico-vaginal fistula (96%) type 2-3 (37%) and it was repaired using a transvaginal approach (67%). The average failure rate was 14%. Obstetric fistula is a real public health problem in our environment and it deserves further consideration to be eradicated. Key words: Obstetric fistula, treatment, northern Katanga province, Democratic Republic of the Congo

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January 2018
5 Reads

Respiratory health of dust-exposed Congolese construction workers in Lubumbashi

Environ Risque Sante 2017 ; 16 : 575-582. doi : 10.1684/ers.2017.1094

Environnement, Risques & Sante

Respiratory complaints are common in workers exposed to dust. In this study, we sought to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints among dust-exposed construction workers in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), in comparison to unexposed office workers. This cross-sectional analytical study included 224 construction workers (exposed group) and 242 office workers from public administrative services (control group). Data on respiratory complaints came from a standardized questionnaire, and lung function was evaluated with a Peak Flow Meter. The prevalence of respiratory complaints was higher in construction workers than controls: wheezing (21.4% vs 7.9%), cough (39.3% vs 2.5%), dyspnea after effort (40.2% vs 2.5%), morning sputum (41.5% vs 3.3%), and rhinitis (79.0% vs 17.8%, respectively). After adjustment for age, education level, and smoking, construction work was associated with respiratory complaints such as cough, sputum, wheezing and rhinitis (p<0.05). On the other hand, peak flow rate was significantly lower in dust-exposed construction workers than in controls (439.95_89.58 and 493.23_67.39, respectively) (p<0.05). This study showed high prevalence of respiratory complaints in Congolese construction workers. The findings suggest the need to improve work environment conditions in construction sites in DRC. Key words: construction workers; dust exposure; prevalence; respiratory compliant.

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December 2017
6 Reads

Prevalence of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and associated risk factors in a mining workforce, Democratic Republic of Congo

Pan African Medical Journal. 2017;28:282. doi:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.282.14361

Pan African Medical Journal

Introduction: The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the largest increase occurs in Africa. Obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension (ODH) are major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, causing nearly 18 million deaths worldwide. Various risks associated with mining as an occupational activity are implicated in NCDs' occurrence. This study describes the baseline prevalence of ODH and associated risk factors in the workforce of Tenke Fungurume Mining (TFM), in southern Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 2,749 employees' and contractor's occupational health examination files for 2010. Socio-demographic, occupational, medical, anthropometric and behavioral characteristics were collected and assessed. Disease status regards ODH was based on WHO criteria. A multivariate logistic regression model was used. Results: Overall prevalence of ODH was 4.5%, 11.7%, and 18.2% respectively. Proportions of pre-ODH individuals were 19.7%, 16.5%, and 47.8% respectively. Prevalence of ODH increased with age, professional grade, nature of work, gender and reported alcohol use. Smoking 10 or more cigarettes per day increased risk of diabetes and hypertension, while decreasing obesity. Conclusion: Rates of ODH and associated risk factors are higher in the TFM workforce, than in the general DRC population. This is likely reflective of other mining sites in the country and region. It is evident that ODH are associated with various socio-demographic, occupational, anthropometric, biomedical and behavioral risk factors. A NCD prevention program and close monitoring of disease and risk factors trends are needed in this population.

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November 2017
4 Reads

A cross-sectional study on obesity and related risk factors among women of the central market of Lusonga in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

Pan African Medical Journal. 2017; 28:157 doi:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.157.13762

Pan African Medical Journal

Introduction: Obesity is known as one of adjuvant factors for increase in non-communiable diseases (NCDs). The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of obesity and identify its risk factors among women of the central market of Lusonga in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods: in October 2014, we interviewed a total of 430 women selling in the central market of Lusonga in Lubumbashi. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, health-related habits and behaviors, diet, physical activity, chronic diseases, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were collected. A multivariate logistic regression model was fitted. Results: Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 16.51% and 13.26% respectively. The logistic regression did not show any significant association between age and obesity. Risk of obesity was lower in married women (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.23 (0.08-0.63)). Women with low educational profile (primary school or less) were more likely to be obese than those with higher education (secondary or high school) (aOR = 2.50 (1.12-5.63)). Risk of obesity increased with living in urban area (aOR = 2.52 (1.00-6.36)), use of oral birth control pills (aOR = 11.07 (3.52-34.83)) and low consumption of fruit (aOR = 5.47 (1.88-15.92)) and vegetable (aOR = 2.42 (1.05-5.56)). Obese women were more likely to be hypertensive than non-obese (aOR = 7.15 (2.46-20.75)) and diabetics (aOR = 3.62 (1.62-8.11)). Conclusion: This study has reported a prevalence of 13.26% of obesity among women selling at Lusonga's market. Marital status, education level, residence, use of oral birth control pills and consumption of fruit and vegetables had a significant association with the prevalence of obesity in this category of women.

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October 2017
4 Reads

[Cesarean section in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo I: frequency, indications and maternal and perinatal mortality].

Pan Afr Med J 2017;27:72. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Département de Gynécologie-Obstétrique, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Lubumbashi, République Démocratique du Congo.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2017.27.72.12147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5554676PMC
June 2017
17 Reads

Cesarean section indications and anthropometric parameters in Rwandan nulliparae: preliminary results from a longitudinal survey.

Pan Afr Med J 2016 12;24:310. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

University of Lubumbashi Faculty of Medicine and School of Public Health, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo; University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Kigali, Rwanda.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2016.24.310.9603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5267785PMC
February 2017
157 Reads
1 Citation

Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country.

Pan Afr Med J 2016 8;23:171. Epub 2016 Apr 8.

Faculty of Medicine and School of Public Health, University of Lubumbashi, Lubumbashi, DR Congo; School of Medicine and School of Public Health / College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2016.23.171.8788DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4894666PMC
February 2017
5 Reads

Respiratory Health of Artisanal Miner of Lwisha in Katanga/DR Congo

Open Access Library Journal, 3: e3233. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1103233

Open Access Library Journal

Objective: To determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and make an awareness about the harmful effects of ores dust in the Artisanal miner in the city of Lubumbashi, Katanga province, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Method: In total, 104 artisanal miners have been recruited in an exhaustive manner with 122 administrative officers in the town hall of Lubumbashi, responsible for collecting the taxes in the Stations of the bus as the control group. Respiratory symptoms were collected using a standardized questionnaire. To determine the association between the characteristics of the miners and respiratory symptoms reported, a multi-analysis combined with the test of logistic regression has been privileged. Results: The prevalence of the respiratory symptoms was markedly higher in the artisanal diggers, as compared with the group that controls: wheezing (37.5% vs. 7.4%), shortness breathing after effort (26.9% vs. 3.3%), cough (29.8% vs. 12.3%), asthma (24% vs. 1.6%), rhinitis (20.2% vs. 14.8%), conjunctivitis (16.3% vs. 9.8%), and eczema (34.6% vs. 2.5%). After adjusting for age and education level, digger as occupation was strongly associated with a higher risk of developing respiratory and skin problems (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The study revealed that artisanal miner’s professions, as practiced in Lubumbashi, without any protection against dust, have a negative impact on the respiratory health. It proves to be very important to organize a teaching specialized in Occupational Medicine that can train some physicians with an established expertise having to answer if it is needed to be enormous in qualified staff in this area considered at respiratory risk.

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December 2016
4 Reads

Respiratory Problems of Sands Carriers in the City of Lubumbashi/Rd Congo

Open Access Library Journal, 3: e3172. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1103172

Open Access Library Journal

Objective: To determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and illustrate the dangerousness of the sands dust in the Artisanal carriers in the city of Lubumbashi, Katanga province, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Method: In total, 120 carriers of sand have been recruited in an exhaustive approach with 120 communal administrative officers of Lubumbashi city as control group. Respiratory symptoms were collected using a respiratory questionnaire. A multi-analysis varied with the test of logistic regression has been privileged to determine the association between the characteristics of the carriers and the respiratory symptoms. Results: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms reported in carriers of sands was greater than that of the control group for the symptoms such as: cough in the morning (52.5% against 6.7%), sputum in the morning (35% against 7.5%), shortness of breath after effort (18.3% against 5%), asthma (26.7% against 5%), chronic bronchitis (12.5% against 4.2%), rhinitis (62.5% against 21.7%), conjunctivitis (58.3% against 17.5%). After adjustment, on factors such as age and education, the profession carrier of sands was strongly associated with the risk of developing respiratory symptoms below: spit in the morning, shortness of breath after effort, asthma, chronic bronchitis with a p < 0.001. The Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) has been significantly reduced in the Carriers of sands (438.87 ± 109.02) compared to controls (480.14 ± 70.73) (p ˂ 0.05). Conclusion: The profession carriers of sand as practiced in Lubumbashi, without means of adequate protection, carry a clear risk for respiratory health. It is essential to organize a specialized education in medicine of the work which can train doctors with proven expertise to address the enormous need for qualified personnel in this environment considered at risk of breathing. Subject Areas Epidemiology Keywords The Carriers, Prevalence, Dust of Sands, Respiratory Health

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November 2016
5 Reads

Universal health coverage in Rwanda: dream or reality.

Pan Afr Med J 2014 27;17:232. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

School of Public Health, National University of Rwanda, Butare, Rwanda.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2014.17.232.3471DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4145275PMC
May 2015
15 Reads
7 Citations

Enhancing formal educational and in-service training programs in rural Rwanda: a partnership among the public sector, a nongovernmental organization, and academia.

Acad Med 2014 Aug;89(8):1117-24

Dr. Cancedda is associate physician, Divisions of Global Health Equity and Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, instructor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and former director of medical education and training, Partners In Health Rwanda/Inshuti Mu Buzima, Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. Dr. Farmer is associate physician and division chief, Divisions of Global Health Equity and Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, professor of medicine and department chair, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and cofounder, Partners In Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Kyamanywa is dean and associate professor, School of Medicine, University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Butare, Rwanda. Dr. Riviello is director, Global Surgery Programs, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Center for Surgery and Public Health, instructor in surgery, Harvard Medical School, and director, Global Surgery Programs, Partners In Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Rhatigan is associate physician and associate division chief, Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, instructor in medicine, Harvard Medical School, and director, Global Health Delivery Partnership, Partners In Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Ms. Wagner is research fellow, Global Health Delivery Partnership, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Ngabo is director, Division of Maternal and Child Health, Ministry of Health, Kigali, Rwanda. Mr. Anatole is program director, Mentoring and Enhanced Supervision-Quality Improvement Program, Partners In Health Rwanda/Inshuti Mu Buzima, Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. Dr. Drobac is associate physician, Divisions of Global Health Equity and Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, instructor in medicine, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, executive director, Partners In Health

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000000376DOI Listing
August 2014
80 Reads
12 Citations
2.934 Impact Factor

Identifying characteristics associated with performing recommended practices in maternal and newborn care among health facilities in Rwanda: a cross-sectional study.

Hum Resour Health 2012 Jul 9;10:13. Epub 2012 Jul 9.

Department of Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1478-4491-10-13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3444308PMC
July 2012
39 Reads
8 Citations

Top co-authors

Olivier Mukuku
Olivier Mukuku

Institut Supérieur des Techniques Médicales de Lubumbashi

7
Oscar Numbi Luboya
Oscar Numbi Luboya

Université de Lubumbashi

4
Agnes Binagwaho
Agnes Binagwaho

Harvard Medical School

3
Cameron T Nutt
Cameron T Nutt

Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

2
Justin Kizonde
Justin Kizonde

Clinques Universitaires de Lubumbashi

2
Xavier Kinenkinda
Xavier Kinenkinda

Cliniques Universitaires de Lubumbashi

2