Dr. Jayashankar Das, PhD - Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre (GBRC), DST, GoG - Joint Director

Dr. Jayashankar Das

PhD

Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre (GBRC), DST, GoG

Joint Director

Gandhinagar, Gujarat | India

Main Specialties: Biochemical Genetics, Biotechnology, Infectious Disease, Medical Genetics

Additional Specialties: Biotechnology, Genomics, computational biology,

Dr. Jayashankar Das, PhD - Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre (GBRC), DST, GoG - Joint Director

Dr. Jayashankar Das

PhD

Introduction

Technoadministration and Research in cutting edge areas towards development of molecular diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccine development, recombinant enzymes, etc via high throughput Genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics, bioinformatics. Managing diversified team and simplifying complex ideas/concepts, synthesize and summarize a complex set of facts and set opportunities within the broader strategic context.

Primary Affiliation: Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre (GBRC), DST, GoG - Gandhinagar, Gujarat , India

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Publications

9Publications

72Reads

35Profile Views

4PubMed Central Citations

Exploring Leptospiral proteomes to identify potential candidates for vaccine design against Leptospirosis using an immunoinformatics approach.

Sci Rep 2018 May 2;8(1):6935. Epub 2018 May 2.

Gujarat State Biotechnology Mission, Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, 382011, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25281-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932004PMC
May 2018
20 Reads
5.080 Impact Factor

LeptoDB: an integrated database of genomics and proteomics resource of Leptospira.

Database (Oxford) 2018 01;2018

Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre, Department of Science and Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382011, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/bay057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6007218PMC
January 2018
2 Reads
3.372 Impact Factor

Cross-Kingdom Regulation of Putative miRNAs Derived from Happy Tree in Cancer Pathway: A Systems Biology Approach.

Int J Mol Sci 2017 Jun 3;18(6). Epub 2017 Jun 3.

Gujarat Institute of Bioinformatics, Gujarat State Biotechnology Mission, Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar 382011, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486014PMC
June 2017
42 Reads
1 Citation
2.862 Impact Factor

Intra-specific genetic diversity, phytochemical analysis and antioxidant activities of a potential Himalayan Swertia ( Swertia bimaculata Hook. F. & Thomas.)

Industrial Crops and Products

Swertia bimaculata Hook. F. & Thomas. is an unexplored, less bitter species which is frequently mixed with Swertia chirayita as a substitute and adulterants. Continuous indiscriminate harvesting has enormously reduced its population strength in the natural habitat of Eastern Himalayas. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the level of genetic diversity, phytochemical constituents and antioxidant potential of different parts of S. bimaculata. Nineteen accessions of S. bimaculata collected from different locations of the Sikkim Himalayan region were analysed for genetic variation using 20 ISSR primers which generated 56 (93.3%) polymorphic amplicons. A high level of genetic diversity (h = 0.22 and I = 0.32) was detected among accessions. There was a moderate genetic differentiation (Gst = 0.44) observed among populations. Different parts of the species were evaluated in terms of total polyphenol, flavonoid, alkaloid, saponin and tannin contents. The study revealed that the level of polyphenols, flavonoids and alkaloids in the methanol extracts of the leaf and stem of S. bimaculata was considerable. However, leaf extracts showed significantly higher content of phytochemicals than the other parts. Antioxidant potential of different parts was tested by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) model system. Methanolic extracts of leaf exhibited stronger radical scavenging ability and its percentage of inhibition reached to 93.14% with the lowest IC50 value of 4.80 μg/ml, which indicates its good antioxidant potential. Leaf of S. bimaculata can be used as a source of important phytochemicals like xanthones and as a substitute of commonly used S. chirayita.

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August 2013
12 Reads

Callus-mediated organogenesis and effect of growth regulators on production of different valepotriates in Indian valerian (Valeriana jatamansi Jones.)

Acta Physiologiae Plantarum

A reproducible and efficient callus-mediated shoot regeneration system was developed for the large-scale production of Valeriana jatamansi Jones., a highly medicinal plant species of global pharmaceutical importance. Effect of Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on callus induction and production of valepotriates accumulation was studied by using different explants. In V. jatamansi, the degree of callus induction varied significantly depending on explants type and the growth regulators used. Among different explants used, rhizomes have the highest callus induction potential followed by leaf. The callus induction frequency was found to be optimum in rhizome explants on media supplemented with 0.5 mg/l 2,4-D. The regenerative ability of proliferated compact calli was studied by the application of cytokinins alone and in combination with auxin. MS medium fortified with 0.75 mg/l thidiazuron in combination with 0.5 mg/l NAA showed the highest regeneration frequency (88.6 %) and produced the maximum number of shoot buds (15.20 ± 0.20) capable of growing into single plants. Vigorous callus obtained from MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of 2,4-D, NAA and IBA were used for industrially important valepotriates [acevaltrate (ACE), valtrate (VAL) and didrovaltrate (DID)] analysis. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of callus revealed that medium with 2,4-D (1 mg/l) was found responsible for increasing ACE and DID yield, whereas VAL production was higher in case of medium supplemented with NAA (1 mg/l). However, the accumulation of valepotriates in callus decreased in logarithmic phase after 8 weeks. IBA was not beneficial for the valepotriate synthesis, as it helped to accumulate significantly lower concentration of ACE, VAL and DID. Micropropagated plantlets with well-developed root system were successfully acclimatized in greenhouse condition, in root trainers containing garden soil with a survival frequency of 100 %. As Indian valerian is a highly traded medicinal plant due to extensive use of its industrially important secondary metabolites, the present system can be utilized to obtain mass multiplication of the species as well as for the stable biomass and continuous valepotriate production for the pharmaceutical industries.

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May 2013
10 Reads

Volatile Constituents of Valeriana hardwickii Wall. Root Oil from Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalaya

Records of Natural Products

The composition of the essential oil extracted from Valeriana hardwickii Wall. roots growing wild in Talle Valley of Arunachal Pradesh, Eastern Himalaya was analyzed by capillary GC and GC/MS. Thirty-one compounds representing 89.6% of the total oil were identified. The oil was found to be rich in sesquiterpenes from which oxygenated sesquiterpenes (25.7%). Methyl linoleate (21.1%) and Valeracetate (11.6%) were the major constituents present in the oil. Whereas, Bornyl acetate (11.2%) and -Terpinyl acetate (4.7%) were the only oxygenated monoterpenes identified in the investigated sample. Essential oil and its constituents of V. hardwickii may be used as the substitute of highly traded Indian Valerian (V. jatamansi) and European V. officinalis.

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August 2011
6 Reads

Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae on growth and saponin accumulation in Chlorophytum borivilianum

Science Asia

Safed musli (Chlorophytum borivilianum) contains pharmacologically important steroidal saponins that have attracted pharmacological societies and researchers worldwide. To estimate the beneficial effects of different vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and C. borivilianum symbiotic association we studied phosphorus uptake, root carbon, spore build up, root dry mass, and saponin accumulation in different harvesting periods. In the VAM colonized roots studied, a significantly higher spore build-up was found in Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae than in the Glomus fasciculatum or non-colonized treatment at the critical growth stage of the species (90 days). However, all the mycorrhizal treatments showed significant increase in phosphorus uptake and root carbon percentage. The results reveal that mycorrhizal fungi substantially enhance the saponin content of C. borivilianum, depending upon the type of VAM fungi supplied. G. mosseae contributed 5 fold (0.56 g to 2.8 g/plant) enhancements in saponin accumulation followed by G. intraradices (0.56 g to 2.7 g/plant) in comparison to non-mycorrhizal plants. After 270 days, saponin content and root growth in all the mycorrhizal inoculated plants was found to be greater than in non-mycorrhizal material. The present study is a first report of an increase in secondary metabolite accumulation and root growth enhancement in C. borivilianum as an effect of mycorrhizal inoculation.

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June 2011
12 Reads

Terpenoid compositions and antioxidant activities of two Indian valerian oils from the Khasi Hills of north-east India.

Nat Prod Commun 2011 Jan;6(1):129-32

Department of Biotechnology, Gauhati University, Guwahati-781 084, India.

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January 2011
8 Reads
3 Citations

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