Publications by authors named "Javed Iqbal Wani"

6 Publications

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Differential Association of Selected Adipocytokines, Adiponectin, Leptin, Resistin, Visfatin and Chemerin, with the Pathogenesis and Progression of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in the Asir Region of Saudi Arabia: A Case Control Study.

J Pers Med 2022 May 1;12(5). Epub 2022 May 1.

Department of Family medicine, College of Medicine, University of Bisha, Bisha 61922, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Sedentary lifestyles, urbanization and improvements in socio-economic status have had serious effects on the burden of diabetes across the world. Diabetes is one of the 10 leading causes of death globally, and individuals with diabetes have a 2-3-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality. Adipose tissue is increasingly understood as a highly active endocrine gland that secretes many biologically active substances, including adipocytokines. However, the exact and discrete pathophysiological links between obesity and T2DM are not yet fully elucidated.

Methods: In the current study, we present the association of five diverse adipocytokines, adiponectin, leptin, resistin, visfatin and chemerin, with T2DM in 87 patients (46 males and 41 females) with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 85 healthy controls (44 males and 41 females) from the Asir region of Saudi Arabia. The patients were divided into four groups: normal BMI, overweight, obese and severely obese. The baseline biochemical characteristics, including HbA1c and anthropometric lipid indices, such as BMI and waist-hip ratio, were determined by standard procedures, whereas the selected adipokine levels were assayed by ELISA.

Results: The results showed significantly decreased levels of adiponectin in the T2DM patients compared to the control group, and the decrease was more pronounced in obese and severely obese T2DM patients. Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the females compared to the males in the controls as well as all the four groups of T2DM patients. In the male T2DM patients, a progressive increase was observed in the leptin levels as the BMI increased, although these only reached significantly altered levels in the obese and severely obese patients. The serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the severely obese female patients compared to the controls, patients with normal BMI, and overweight patients. The leptin/adiponectin ratio was significantly higher in the obese and severely obese patients compared to the controls, patients with normal BMI, and overweight patients in both genders. The serum resistin levels did not show any significant differences between the males and females in thr controls or in the T2DM groups, irrespective of the BMI status of the T2DM patients. The visfatin levels did not reveal any significant gender-based differences, but significantly higher levels of visfatin were observed in the T2DM patients, irrespective of their level of obesity, although the higher values were observed in the obese and highly obese patients. Similarly, the serum chemerin levels in the controls, as well as in T2DM patients, did not show any significant gender-based differences. However, in the T2DM patients, the chemerin levels showed a progressive increase, with the increase in BMI reaching highly significant levels in the obese and severely obese patients, respectively.

Conclusion: In summary, it is concluded that significantly altered concentrations of four adipokines, adiponectin, leptin, visfatin and chemerin, were found in the T2DM patient group compared to the controls, with more pronounced alterations observed in the obese and highly obese patients. Thus, it can be surmised that these four adipokines play a profound role in the onset, progression and associated complications of T2DM. In view of the relatively small sample size in our study, future prospective studies are needed on a large sample size to explore the in-depth relationship between adipokines and T2DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm12050735DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9143828PMC
May 2022

Clinical Implications of Glyoxalase1 Gene Polymorphism and Elevated Levels of the Reactive Metabolite Methylglyoxal in the Susceptibility of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the Patients from Asir and Tabuk Regions of Saudi Arabia.

J Pers Med 2022 Apr 15;12(4). Epub 2022 Apr 15.

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Shaqra University, Shaqra 11961, Saudi Arabia.

Diabetes mellitus constitutes a big challenge to the global health care system due to its socioeconomic impacts and very serious complications. The incidence and the prevalence rate are increased in the Gulf region including the KSA. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is caused by diverse risk factors including obesity, unhealthy dietary habits, physical inactivity, smoking and genetic factors. The molecular genetic studies have helped in the detection of many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with different diseases including cancers, cardiovascular diseases and T2DM. The glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) is a detoxifying enzyme and catalyzes the elimination of the cytotoxic product methylglyoxal (MG) by converting it to D-lactate, which is not toxic to tissues. MG accumulation is associated with the pathogenesis of different diseases including T2DM. In this study, we have investigated the association of the glyoxalase 1 SNPs (rs2736654) rs4746 C>A and rs1130534 T>A with T2DM using the amplification refractory mutation system PCR. We also measured the concentration of MG by ELISA in T2DM patients and matched heathy controls. Results show that the CA genotype of the GLO rs4647 A>C was associated with T2DM with OR = 2.57, -value 0.0008 and the C allele was also associated with increased risk to T2DM with OR = 2.24, -value = 0.0001. It was also observed that AT genotype of the rs1130534 was associated with decreased susceptibility to T2DM with OR = 0.3, -value = 0.02. The A allele of rs1130534 was also associated with reduced risk to T2DM with PR = 0.27 = 0.006. In addition, our ELISA results demonstrate significantly increased MG concentrations in serum of the T2DM patients. We conclude that the GLO1 SNP may be associated with decreased enzyme activity and a resultant susceptibility to T2DM. Further well-designed studies in different and large patient populations are recommended to verify these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm12040639DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9030104PMC
April 2022

Potential impact of , and gene abnormalities on the development and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asir and Tabuk regions of Saudi Arabia.

Mol Med Rep 2022 May 16;25(5). Epub 2022 Mar 16.

Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Bisha, Bisha 61922, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by persistent hyperglycemia and is associated with serious complications. The risk factors for T2DM include both genetic and lifestyle factors. Genome‑wide association studies have indicated the association of genetic variations with many diseases, including T2DM. Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in the regulation of insulin release in the pancreas and catalyzes the first step in glycolysis in the liver. Genetic alterations in the gene have been implicated in both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) are small non‑coding RNA molecules that are involved in the important physiological processes including glucose metabolism. In the present study, the association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the , and genes with susceptibility to T2DM in patients from two regions of Saudi Arabia were examined, using the tetra‑primer amplification refractory mutation system. The results showed that the AA genotype and the A allele of GCK rs1799884 were associated with T2DM [odds ratio (OR)=2.25, P=0.032 and OR=1.55, P=0.021, respectively]. Likewise, the CT genotype and T allele of rs11614913 were associated with an increased risk of T2DM (OR=2.36, P=0.0059 and OR=1.74, P=0.023, respectively). In addition, the CA genotype of rs6505162 C>A was found to be linked with T2DM (OR=2.12 and P=0.021). It was concluded in the present research study that gene variations in , and are potentially associated with an increased risk of T2DM. These results, in the future, may help in the identification and stratification of individuals susceptible to T2DM. Future longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes and in different ethnic populations are recommended to validate these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2022.12675DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8941532PMC
May 2022

Strong Association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-2 Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism with Susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, Hypertension, Coronary Artery Disease and COVID-19 Disease Mortality.

J Pers Med 2021 Oct 27;11(11). Epub 2021 Oct 27.

Department of Family medicine, College of Medicine University of Bisha, Bisha 61922, Saudi Arabia.

Background: The ongoing outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 represents a significant challenge to international health. Several reports have highlighted the importance of ACE2 on the pathogenesis of COVID-19. The spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 efficiently binds to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors and facilitates virus entry into the host cell. In the present study, we hypothesize that a functional insertion/deletion polymorphism-rs4646994 I/D and rs4240157 T > C in the ACE gene could be associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality.

Methodology: This study included 117 consecutive COVID-19 patients and 150 age matched healthy controls (ACE2-rs4646994 I/D) and 100 age matched healthy controls with ACE2 rs4240157 T > C. We used Mutation specific PCR (MSP) for ACE2-rs4646994 I/D genotyping and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR) for ACE2 rs4240157 T > C genotyping.

Results: Results indicated that there were significant differences in the genotype distributions of ACE2-rs4646994 I/D polymorphisms ( < 0.030) and ACE2 rs4240157 T > C between COVID-19 patients and controls (-values < 0.05). Higher frequency of DD genotype (48.71%) and D allele (0.67) was reported in COVID-19 patients than controls. Our results showed that the ACE2-DD genotype was strongly associated with increased COVID-19 severity (OR 2.37 (95%) CI = (1.19-4.70), RR = 1.39 (1.09-1.77), < 0.013) and also a strong association was seen with ACE2-ID genotype with COVID-19 severity (OR 2.20 (95%) CI = (1.08-4.46), < 0.020) in the codominant model. In allelic comparison, the D allele was strongly associated with COVID-19 severity (OR 1.58 (95% CI) (1.11-2.27), RR 1.21 (1.05-1.41) < 0.010). A significant correlation of ACE2-I/D genotypes was reported with Age ( < 0.035), T2D ( < 0.0013), hypertension ( < 0.0031) and coronary artery disease ( < 0.0001). Our results indicated ACE2-DD genotype was strongly associated with increased COVID-19 mortality (OR 8.25 (95%) CI = (2.40 to 28.34), < 0.008) and also ACE2-DD + DI genotype was strongly associated with increased COVID-19 mortality with OR 4.74 (95%) CI = (1.5214 to 14.7915), < 0.007. A significant correlation was reported between COVID-19 patients and age matched controls ( < 0.0007). Higher frequency of heterozygosity TC (40%) followed by ACE2-CC genotype (24.78%) was reported among COVID-19 patients. Using multivariate analysis, ACE2-CT genotype was strong associated with SARS-CoV-2 severity with an OR 2.18 (95% CI) (1.92-3.99), < 0.010 and also ACE2-CC genotype was linked with COVID-19 severity with an OR 2.66 (95% CI) (1.53-4.62), < 0.005. A significant correlation of ACE2-T > C genotypes was reported with gender ( < 0.04), T2D ( < 0.035). ACE2-CC genotype was strongly associated with increased COVID-19 mortality OR 3.66 (95%) CI = (1.34 to 9.97), < 0.011 and also ACE2-C allele was associated with COVID-19 mortality OR 2, 01 (1.1761-3.45), < 0.010.

Conclusions: It is concluded that ACE-DD genotype and D allele was strongly associated with increased COVID-19 patient severity. In addition, ACE I/D polymorphism were strongly associated with advanced age, diabetes and ischemic heart disease in COVID-19 patients whereas ACE-II genotype was a protective factor against the development of severe COVID-19. ACE2-DD genotype was strongly associated with increased COVID-19 mortality. Additionally, ACE2-CC and CT genotypes were strongly associated with COVID-19 severity. Therefore, our study might be useful for identifying the susceptible population groups for targeted interventions and for making relevant public health policy decisions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm11111098DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8621157PMC
October 2021

The association of anemia as a risk of heart failure.

J Family Med Prim Care 2020 Feb 28;9(2):839-843. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

PG Student MD (Medicine), Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir.

Aim: The present study was conducted to assess the presence of anemia in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) and compared the clinical characteristics of patients with anemia and without anemia.

Methodology: The present study was conducted on 102 patients (60 males, 42 females) with advanced HF admitted in hospital. In all, general physical and clinical examinations were performed. All were subjected to complete blood count (CBC), hematocrit, and assessment of urea, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The levels of serum iron, ferritin, iron saturation, and iron-binding capacity were also evaluated. The causes of HF were assessed.

Results: Mean age was 48.2 ± 5.7 and 42.2 ± 6.2 years in males and females patients, respectively. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 0.26 ± 0.8 in males and 0.24 ± 0.5 in females. 71.5% males and 76.3% females were on inotropic support. The etiology of HF was ischemia in 29% males and 27% females, high blood pressure in 15% males and 12% females, obesity in 18% males and 19% females, valvular heart disease in 7% males and 5% females, diabetes in 11% males and 6% females, and idiopathy in 20% males and 31% females. There was a significant difference in mean age, initial HB, final HB, hypertension, creatinine, BNP, and initial hematocrit level in patients with anemia and without anemia ( < 0.05). Deaths in hospital were also significant ( < 0.05).

Conclusion: Anemia was seen in one-third of the patients with HF. Anemia was an independent marker with poor prognosis. Anemic patients were older than non-anemic patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_791_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7114064PMC
February 2020

Orientation of university students about brain-death and organ donation: A cross-sectional study.

Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2016 Sep-Oct;27(5):966-970

Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia.

The gap between demand and supply of organs continues. No country has found a concrete solution for tackling this problem. We attempted to evaluate the general information and attitude of university students in their primary basic science stage, when they did not receive special education regarding brain death and organ donation in Saudi Arabia. Since they were from different cities with different cultures and values, we believe that we could assess the educational needs of future doctors and paramedical staff, to help them gain enough competence for solving the concerns of the population at large. The present study is a secondary analysis of a survey conducted at the King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia, from March to May 2014, about the knowledge of and attitudes toward brain death, organ donation, and transplantation in a sample of university students. A total of 873 university students participated in the survey and 93% from the cohort had heard about brain death. Eighty-five percent got their information about brain death from the media. Seventy-three percent of the cohort had the impression that there is no difference between brain death and natural death. An organized educational program about all aspects of organ donation, particularly from deceased donors, seems necessary in the curriculum, which can be started at an early level and built up gradually to impart a gradual comprehensive knowledge on beliefs and practices about brain death, organ donation, and transplantation. The Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation in collaboration with other regional societies and regional professional organizations has to work together to achieve this long-term goal to save the precious lives of people, awaiting transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1319-2442.190865DOI Listing
August 2017
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