Publications by authors named "Jason W Hammond"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Asynchronous Bilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture with Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect 2021 04 9;11(2). Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland.

Case: A 36-year-old male competitive powerlifter sustained asynchronous bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures after using 2 types of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Both tendon ruptures occurred near the myotendinous junction and were treated with open surgical repair and an initial period of immobilization followed by progressive weightbearing and rehabilitation; no postoperative complications were observed.

Conclusion: Previous studies have reported that anabolic androgenic steroids have a deleterious impact on tendon structure and function. This case suggests that SARM compounds may also predispose users to Achilles tendon rupture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.CC.20.00635DOI Listing
April 2021

Adjustable Cortical Fixation Device for Quadriceps Tendon Repair: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study.

Orthop J Sports Med 2021 Jan 28;9(1):2325967120974393. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: Adjustable cortical fixation devices have demonstrated utility in orthopaedic applications, such as ankle syndesmosis repair.

Purpose: To assess the cyclic gap formation of a quadriceps tendon repair technique using an adjustable cortical fixation device compared with repair with knotless suture anchors and suture tape, a modification of conventional suture anchor repair.

Study Design: Controlled laboratory study.

Methods: Eight fresh-frozen matched pairs of cadaveric knees were used. Specimens in each pair were randomized to undergo either modified suture anchor repair (control) or adjustable cortical fixation repair. The control repair was performed as previously described. The experimental repair was performed using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures placed into the quadriceps tendon in a running locked Krackow configuration and 2 adjustable loop devices passed through transosseous tunnels. The lagging strands of the devices were tensioned to seat the cortical fixation buttons at the inferior patellar pole and then tied to the free Krackow strands at the superior pole to complete the repair. The mean plastic gap (permanent tendon displacement that did not recover with cyclic extension) and mean maximum gap (peak displacement that occurred with cyclic knee flexion and partially recovered with extension) were evaluated during cyclic loading for 500 cycles of full knee extension to 90° of flexion.

Results: At all testing intervals, the mean plastic gap was significantly smaller for the cortical fixation group versus the suture anchor group ( < .02). Similarly, the mean maximum gap was significantly smaller for the cortical fixation specimens at all testing intervals ( < .01). After cyclic loading, the mean maximum gap was significantly smaller in the cortical fixation group (4.80 ± 1.56 mm) versus the suture anchor group (8.47 ± 1.47 mm; = < .001). The mean plastic gap was also significantly smaller in the cortical fixation versus the suture anchor group (3.25 ± 1.10 mm vs 6.57 ± 1.62 mm, respectively; = < .001).

Conclusion: Quadriceps tendon repair using an adjustable cortical fixation device demonstrated superior biomechanical properties in cyclic displacement testing compared with repair using the suture anchor technique.

Clinical Relevance: These results suggest that an adjustable cortical fixation device is a biomechanically viable alternative for quadriceps tendon repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967120974393DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7869174PMC
January 2021

Use of autologous platelet-rich plasma to treat muscle strain injuries.

Am J Sports Med 2009 Jun 12;37(6):1135-42. Epub 2009 Mar 12.

Union Memorial Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: Standard nonoperative therapy for acute muscle strains usually involves short-term rest, ice, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, but there is no clear consensus on how to accelerate recovery.

Hypothesis: Local delivery of platelet-rich plasma to injured muscles hastens recovery of function.

Study Design: Controlled laboratory study.

Methods: In vivo, the tibialis anterior muscles of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were injured by a single (large strain) lengthening contraction or multiple (small strain) lengthening contractions, both of which resulted in a significant injury. The tibialis anterior either was injected with platelet-rich plasma, was injected with platelet-poor plasma as a sham treatment, or received no treatment.

Results: Both injury protocols yielded a similar loss of force. The platelet-rich plasma only had a beneficial effect at 1 time point after the single contraction injury protocol. However, platelet-rich plasma had a beneficial effect at 2 time points after the multiple contraction injury protocol and resulted in a faster recovery time to full contractile function. The sham injections had no effect compared with no treatment.

Conclusion: Local delivery of platelet-rich plasma can shorten recovery time after a muscle strain injury in a small-animal model. Recovery of muscle from the high-repetition protocol has already been shown to require myogenesis, whereas recovery from a single strain does not. This difference in mechanism of recovery may explain why platelet-rich plasma was more effective in the high-repetition protocol, because platelet-rich plasma is rich in growth factors that can stimulate myogenesis.

Clinical Relevance: Because autologous blood products are safe, platelet-rich plasma may be a useful product in clinical treatment of muscle injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546508330974DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3523111PMC
June 2009

Shoulder arthroplasty versus hip and knee arthroplasties: a comparison of outcomes.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2007 Feb;455:183-9

Division of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780, USA.

Although outcomes of shoulder, hip, and knee arthroplasties have been well-described, there have been no studies directly comparing the outcomes of these procedures as treatments for osteoarthritis. We compared the inpatient mortality, complications, length of stay, and total charges of patients who had shoulder arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with those of patients who had hip and knee arthroplasties for osteoarthritis. A review of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission discharge database identified 994 shoulder arthroplasties, 15,414 hip arthroplasties, and 34,471 knee arthroplasties performed for osteoarthritis from 1994 to 2001. There were no in-hospital deaths after shoulder arthroplasty, whereas 27 (0.18%) and 54 (0.16%) deaths occurred after hip and knee arthroplasties, respectively. Compared with patients who had hip or knee arthroplasties, patients who had shoulder arthroplasties had, on average, a lower complication rate, a shorter length of stay, and fewer total charges. The latter had 1/2 as many in-hospital complications, were 1/6 as likely to have a length of stay 6 days or greater, and were 1/10 as likely to be charged more than $15,000. We believe shoulder arthroplasty is as safe as the more commonly performed major joint arthroplasties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.blo.0000238839.26423.8dDOI Listing
February 2007

Surgeon experience and clinical and economic outcomes for shoulder arthroplasty.

J Bone Joint Surg Am 2003 Dec;85(12):2318-24

Division of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, 10753 Falls Road, Suite 215, Lutherville, MD 21093, USA.

Background: Previous studies have demonstrated that a high surgical volume for certain surgical procedures reduces morbidity and improves economic outcome; however, to our knowledge, no study has demonstrated a similar relationship between volume and outcome for total shoulder arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty. The objective of this study was to determine whether increased surgeon experience was associated with improved clinical and economic outcomes for patients undergoing total shoulder arthroplasty or hemiarthroplasty.

Methods: We analyzed discharge data on patients treated between 1994 and 2000 from the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission, which has a statewide hospital discharge database of all patients in the state of Maryland. The database included all patients undergoing total shoulder arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty. We assessed the relationship between surgeon volume (low, medium, and high) and the risk of complications, length of stay, and total charges. The statistics were adjusted for procedure, age, gender, race, marital status, comorbidity, diagnosis, insurance type, income, and hospital volume.

Results: For the 1868 discrete total shoulder arthroplasties and hemiarthroplasties done in the state of Maryland, the risk of at least one complication associated with the procedures done by the high-volume surgeon group was nearly half that associated with the procedures done by the low-volume surgeon group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.4 to 0.9). High-volume surgeons were three times more likely than were low-volume surgeons to have patients with a hospital stay of less than six days (odds ratio, 0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.2 to 0.6). Although the average cost of hospitalization was $1000 less in the high-volume surgeon group compared with the low-volume surgeon group, this reduction did not reach significance after adjustment for multiple variables (odds ratio, 0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.4).

Conclusions: This study indicates that the patients of surgeons with higher average annual caseloads of total shoulder arthroplasties and hemiarthroplasties have decreased complication rates and hospital lengths of stay compared with the patients of surgeons who perform fewer of these procedures. These analyses of hospital discharge data are limited because of a lack of prospective data, operative details, and patient outcomes data. However, this study emphasizes the importance of continued education for orthopaedic surgeons who perform shoulder arthroplasty.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/00004623-200312000-00008DOI Listing
December 2003