Publications by authors named "Jason T Poston"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Management of Critically Ill Adults With COVID-19.

JAMA 2020 May;323(18):1839-1841

General Internal Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2020.4914DOI Listing
May 2020

Sepsis associated acute kidney injury.

BMJ 2019 Jan 9;364:k4891. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

Sepsis is defined as organ dysfunction resulting from the host's deleterious response to infection. One of the most common organs affected is the kidneys, resulting in sepsis associated acute kidney injury (SA-AKI) that contributes to the morbidity and mortality of sepsis. A growing body of knowledge has illuminated the clinical risk factors, pathobiology, response to treatment, and elements of renal recovery that have advanced our ability to prevent, detect, and treat SA-AKI. Despite these advances, SA-AKI remains an important concern and clinical burden, and further study is needed to reduce the acute and chronic consequences. This review summarizes the relevant evidence, with a focus on the risk factors, early recognition and diagnosis, treatment, and long term consequences of SA-AKI. In addition to literature pertaining to SA-AKI specifically, pertinent sepsis and acute kidney injury literature relevant to SA-AKI was included.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k4891DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6890472PMC
January 2019

Introduction to the ATS Core Curriculum Series, 2017.

Authors:
Jason T Poston

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2017 08;14(Suppl_2):S149

Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201708-660EDDOI Listing
August 2017

Implementation of a Professional Society Core Curriculum and Integrated Maintenance of Certification Program.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2017 Apr;14(4):495-499

13 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Mount Auburn Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Medical professional societies exist to foster collaboration, guide career development, and provide continuing medical education opportunities. Maintenance of certification is a process by which physicians complete formal educational activities approved by certifying organizations. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) established an innovative maintenance of certification program in 2012 as a means to formalize and expand continuing medical education offerings. This program is unique as it includes explicit opportunities for collaboration and career development in addition to providing continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credit to society members. In describing the development of this program referred to as the "Core Curriculum," the authors highlight the ATS process for content design, stages of curriculum development, and outcomes data with an eye toward assisting other societies that seek to program similar content. The curriculum development process described is generalizable and positively influences individual practitioners and professional societies in general, and as a result, provides a useful model for other professional societies to follow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201612-1001PSDOI Listing
April 2017

Patient safety room of horrors: a novel method to assess medical students and entering residents' ability to identify hazards of hospitalisation.

BMJ Qual Saf 2016 Mar 30;25(3):153-8. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Division of Biological Sciences, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Background: Patient safety curricula in undergraduate medical education (UME) are often didactic format with little focus on skills training. Despite recent focus on safety, practical training in residency education is also lacking. Assessments of safety skills in UME and graduate medical education (GME) are generally knowledge, and not application-focused. We aimed to develop and pilot a safety-focused simulation with medical students and interns to assess knowledge regarding hazards of hospitalisation.

Methods: A simulation demonstrating common hospital-based safety threats was designed. A case scenario was created including salient patient information and simulated safety threats such as the use of upper-extremity restraints and medication errors. After entering the room and reviewing the mock chart, learners were timed and asked to identify and document as many safety hazards as possible. Learner satisfaction was assessed using constructed-response evaluation. Descriptive statistics, including per cent correct and mean correct hazards, were performed.

Results: All 86 third-year medical students completed the encounter. Some hazards were identified by a majority of students (fall risk, 83% of students) while others were rarely identified (absence of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, 13% of students). Only 5% of students correctly identified pressure ulcer risk. 128 of 131 interns representing 49 medical schools participated in the GME implementation. Incoming interns were able to identify a mean of 5.1 hazards out of the 9 displayed (SD 1.4) with 40% identifying restraints as a hazard, and 20% identifying the inappropriate urinary catheter as a hazard.

Conclusions: A simulation showcasing safety hazards was a feasible and effective way to introduce trainees to safety-focused content. Both students and interns had difficulty identifying common hazards of hospitalisation. Despite poor performance, learners appreciated the interactive experience and its clinical utility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2015-004621DOI Listing
March 2016

ATS Core Curriculum 2014: Part II. Adult critical care medicine.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2014 Oct;11(8):1307-15

1 Division of Pulmonary Science and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201407-322CMEDOI Listing
October 2014

Rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium versus persistent delirium in the intensive care unit.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2014 Mar;189(6):658-65

Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Rationale: Intensive care unit (ICU) delirium is associated with ventilator, ICU, and hospital days; discharge functional status; and mortality. Whether rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium (delirium that abates shortly after sedative interruption) occurs with the same frequency and portends the same prognosis as persistent delirium (delirium that persists despite a short period of sedative interruption) is unknown.

Objectives: To compare rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium and persistent delirium.

Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 102 adult, intubated medical ICU subjects in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU evaluation was performed before and after daily interruption of continuous sedation (DIS). Investigators were blinded to each other's assessments and as to whether evaluations were before or after DIS. The primary outcome was proportion of days with no delirium versus rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium versus persistent delirium. Secondary outcomes were ventilator, ICU, and hospital days; discharge disposition; and 1-year mortality.

Measurements And Main Results: The median proportion of ICU days with delirium was 0.57 before versus 0.50 after DIS (P < 0.001). The Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU indicated patients are 10.5 times more likely to have delirium before DIS versus after (P < 0.001). Rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium showed fewer ventilator (P < 0.001), ICU (P = 0.001), and hospital days (P < 0.001) than persistent delirium. Subjects with no delirium and rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium were more likely to be discharged home (P < 0.001). Patients with persistent delirium had increased 1-year mortality versus those with no delirium and rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Rapidly reversible, sedation-related delirium does not signify the same poor prognosis as persistent delirium. Degree of sedation should be considered in delirium assessments. Coordinating delirium assessments with daily sedative interruption will improve such assessments' ability to prognosticate ICU delirium outcomes. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00919698).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201310-1815OCDOI Listing
March 2014