Publications by authors named "Jasmin Walter"

4 Publications

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Analysis of the equine "cumulome" reveals major metabolic aberrations after maturation in vitro.

BMC Genomics 2019 Jul 17;20(1):588. Epub 2019 Jul 17.

Clinic of Reproductive Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: Maturation of oocytes under in vitro conditions (IVM) results in impaired developmental competence compared to oocytes matured in vivo. As oocytes are closely coupled to their cumulus complex, elucidating aberrations in cumulus metabolism in vitro is important to bridge the gap towards more physiological maturation conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the equine "cumulome" in a novel combination of proteomic (nano-HPLC MS/MS) and metabolomic (UPLC-nanoESI-MS) profiling of single cumulus complexes of metaphase II oocytes matured either in vivo (n = 8) or in vitro (n = 7).

Results: A total of 1811 quantifiable proteins and 906 metabolic compounds were identified. The proteome contained 216 differentially expressed proteins (p ≤ 0.05; FC ≥ 2; 95 decreased and 121 increased in vitro), and the metabolome contained 108 metabolites with significantly different abundance (p ≤ 0.05; FC ≥ 2; 24 decreased and 84 increased in vitro). The in vitro "cumulome" was summarized in the following 10 metabolic groups (containing 78 proteins and 21 metabolites): (1) oxygen supply, (2) glucose metabolism, (3) fatty acid metabolism, (4) oxidative phosphorylation, (5) amino acid metabolism, (6) purine and pyrimidine metabolism, (7) steroid metabolism, (8) extracellular matrix, (9) complement cascade and (10) coagulation cascade. The KEGG pathway "complement and coagulation cascades" (ID4610; n = 21) was significantly overrepresented after in vitro maturation. The findings indicate that the in vitro condition especially affects central metabolism and extracellular matrix composition. Important candidates for the metabolic group oxygen supply were underrepresented after maturation in vitro. Additionally, a shift towards glycolysis was detected in glucose metabolism. Therefore, under in vitro conditions, cumulus cells seem to preferentially consume excess available glucose to meet their energy requirements. Proteins involved in biosynthetic processes for fatty acids, cholesterol, amino acids, and purines exhibited higher abundances after maturation in vitro.

Conclusion: This study revealed the marked impact of maturation conditions on the "cumulome" of individual cumulus oocyte complexes. Under the studied in vitro milieu, cumulus cells seem to compensate for a lack of important substrates by shifting to aerobic glycolysis. These findings will help to adapt culture media towards more physiological conditions for oocyte maturation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-019-5836-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6637639PMC
July 2019

Prevention of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy - Is heparin a novel option? A case report.

Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere 2016 Oct 21;44(5):313-317. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

Dr. Jasmin Walter, Klinik für Reproduktionsmedizin, Vetsuisse-Fakultät der Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zürich, Schweiz, E-Mail:

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) is a severe manifestation of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) infection. Prevention and treatment of EHM during EHV-1 outbreaks is critical, but no reliable and tested specific medication is available. Due to the thromboischemic nature of EHM and due to the fact that EHV-1 entry in cells is blocked by heparin, it was hypothesized that this compound may be useful in reduction of EHM incidence and severity. Therefore, during an acute EHV-1 outbreak with the neuropathogenic G/D Pol variant, metaphylactic treatment with heparin to prevent EHM was initiated. Clinical signs were present in 61 horses (fever n = 55; EHM n = 8; abortion n = 6). Heparin (25000 IU subcutaneously twice daily for 3 days) was given to 31 febrile horses from day 10 of the outbreak, while the first 30 horses exhibiting fever remained untreated. Treatment outcome was analyzed retrospectively. Heparin-treated horses showed a lower EHM incidence (1/31; 3.2%) than untreated horses (7/30; 23.3%; p = 0.03). Results indicate that heparin may be useful for prevention of EHM during an EHV-1 outbreak. These promising data highlight the need for randomized and possibly blinded studies for the use of heparin in EHV-1 outbreaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15653/TPG-150451DOI Listing
October 2016

Skin malformations in a neonatal foal tested homozygous positive for Warmblood Fragile Foal Syndrome.

BMC Vet Res 2015 Jan 31;11:12. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

Clinic of Reproductive Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: Skin malformations that resembled manifestations of Ehlers-Danlos-Syndrome were described in a variety of domestic animals during the last century as cutis hyperelastica, hyperelastosis cutis, dermatosparaxis, dermal/collagen dysplasia, dermal/cutaneous asthenia or Ehlers-Danlos-like syndrome/s. In 2007, the mutation responsible for Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia (HERDA) in Quarter Horses was discovered. Several case reports are available for similar malformations in other breeds than Quarter Horses (Draught Horses, Arabians, and Thoroughbreds) including four case reports for Warmblood horses. Since 2013, a genetic test for the Warmblood Fragile Foal Syndrome Type 1 (WFFS), interrogating the causative point mutation in the equine procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 1 (PLOD1, or lysyl hydroxylase 1) gene, has become available. Only limited data are available on the occurrence rate and clinical characteristics of this newly detected genetic disease in horses. In humans mutations in this gene are associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VI (kyphoscoliotic form).

Case Presentation: This is the first report describing the clinical and histopathological findings in a foal confirmed to be homozygous positive for WFFS. The Warmblood filly was born with very thin, friable skin, skin lesions on the legs and the head, and an open abdomen. These abnormalities required euthanasia just after delivery. Histologic examination revealed abnormally thin dermis, markedly reduced amounts of dermal collagen bundles, with loosely orientation and abnormally large spaces between deep dermal fibers.

Conclusion: WFFS is a novel genetic disease in horses and should be considered in cases of abortion, stillbirth, skin lesions and malformations of the skin in neonatal foals. Genetic testing of suspicious cases will contribute to evaluate the frequency of occurrence of clinical WFFS cases and its relevance for the horse population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-015-0318-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4327794PMC
January 2015

Clinical observations and management of a severe equine herpesvirus type 1 outbreak with abortion and encephalomyelitis.

Acta Vet Scand 2013 Mar 5;55:19. Epub 2013 Mar 5.

Klinik für Reproduktionsmedizin, Vetsuisse-Fakultät Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

Latent equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection is common in horse populations worldwide and estimated to reach a prevalence nearing 90% in some areas. The virus causes acute outbreaks of disease that are characterized by abortion and sporadic cases of myeloencephalopathy (EHM), both severe threats to equine facilities. Different strains vary in their abortigenic and neuropathogenic potential and the simultaneous occurrence of EHM and abortion is rare. In this report, we present clinical observations collected during an EHV-1 outbreak caused by a so-called "neuropathogenic" EHV-1 G(2254)/D(752) polymerase (Pol) variant, which has become more prevalent in recent years and is less frequently associated with abortions. In this outbreak with 61 clinically affected horses, 6/7 pregnant mares aborted and 8 horses developed EHM. Three abortions occurred after development of EHM symptoms. Virus detection was performed by nested PCR targeting gB from nasal swabs (11 positive), blood serum (6 positive) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (9 positive) of a total of 42 horses sampled. All 6 fetuses tested positive for EHV-1 by PCR and 4 by virus isolation. Paired serum neutralization test (SNT) on day 12 and 28 after the index case showed a significant (≥ 4-fold) increase in twelve horses (n = 42; 28.6%). This outbreak with abortions and EHM cases on a single equine facility provided a unique opportunity for the documentation of clinical disease progression as well as diagnostic procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1751-0147-55-19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3630004PMC
March 2013