Publications by authors named "Jariya Lertakyamanee"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

50th Year Anniversary of Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University.

J Med Assoc Thai 2016 May;99(5):618-21

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, has started to be a formal anesthesia division, divided from division of Surgery in 1965; hence our 50th year anniversary in 2015. Research is now a priority and mandatory mission, according to the vision of Mahidol University. Second mission is to teach and train, and we produce the highest number of states-of-the-art anesthesiologists and anesthetic nurses each year Curriculum and training are being continuously improved. From a small unit, now it is one of the largest departments and extends the service, our third mission, to more than only in the operating theaters. We look after pre-anesthesia assessment, inside and outside operating room anesthesia, post-operative pain relief Intensive Care Unit, and chronic pain management. The number of patients and their diseases increase; so do the complexities of surgeries. There are tremendous changes in drugs and equipment. There is the fourth mission on administration, IT and resource management. And the fifth mission which is corporate social responsibility. However, we still believe that compassion, responsibility and integrity are most important. We have taught and tried to live by the teaching of HRH the King's Father. And these will contribute to our progress and shine in the next 50 years.
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May 2016

The efficiency of different adjunct techniques for regional anesthesia.

J Med Assoc Thai 2005 Mar;88(3):371-6

Department of Anesthesiology, Siriraj Hospital, 2 Prannok Rd, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

In the present prospective, randomized controlled trial, 110 unpremedicated patients undergoing orthopedic surgery under regional anesthesia were randomly divided into 5 groups, with 22 patients in each. During the operation, group 1 listened to a pre-recorded explanation and music, group 2 listened to a subliminal sound, group 3 received propofol by patient-controlled sedation (PCS), group 4 received intravenous midazolam, and group 5 was the control group. Patients in the midazolam group were significantly more sedated than the control group at 1 hr into the operation. The group that listened to an explanation and music were significantly less satisfied than the propofol group at the end of the operation and 30 min. postoperatively. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio showed that if explanation and music are used instead of propofol it would save 299.53 baht per patient, but the patient satisfaction score will be 17.26 points lower than if the more expensive drug is used.
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March 2005

The most cost-effective screening method for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among the Bangkok elderly.

J Med Assoc Thai 2003 Dec;86(12):1140-8

Division of Respiratory Disease and Tuberculosis, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Our previous studies demonstrated the high prevalence and incidence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) among the Bangkok elderly, as well as the cost-effectiveness of a questionnaire, chest radiography, and mini peak expiratory flow rate (miniPEF) as screening tools. This final study aimed to identify the most cost-effective screening method among individual, serial and parallel combinations of the above tools, based on the guidelines for diagnosing COPD of the Thoracic Society of Thailand. There were 3,094 elderly aged 60 years and over in 124 urban communities around Siriraj Hospital who participated and completed all the tests. The results showed that the most cost-effective screening method was the miniPEF at cut-off percentage of 62 per cent of predicted value. This needed to screen 19 elderly people at a cost of 923 baht to detect one case of COPD, with a false negative rate of 1.9 per cent (95%CI 1.3-2.5), a false positive rate of 17.5 per cent (95%CI 15.4-19.6). The questionnaire is the alternative choice of screening tool.
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December 2003

The cost-effectiveness of mini peak expiratory flow as a screening test for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among the Bangkok elderly.

J Med Assoc Thai 2003 Dec;86(12):1133-9

Division of Respiratory Disease and Tuberculosis, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

This study aims to explore the cost-effectiveness of Mini Peak Expiratory Flow (miniPEF) as a screening test for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) among the elderly in 124 urban communities around Siriraj Hospital, using the gold standard of diagnosis based on the guidelines of the Thoracic Society of Thailand. There were 3,094 subjects who participated and completed all the tests. The results showed that the cut-off miniPEF percentage of predicted value of highest average accuracy was 62 per cent. The sensitivity was 72.7 per cent (95% CI 67.0-78.6) and the specificity was 81.1 per cent (95% CI 79.7-82.5) The cost of screening 19 elderly to detect one case of COPD is 923 baht, with a false negative rate of 1.9 per cent (95% CI 1.3-2.5%) and a false positive rate of 17.5 per cent (95% CI 15.4-19.6%). It is suggested that measuring a miniPEF is regarded as one of the cost-effective screening tests for COPD in the elderly.
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December 2003

The cost-effectiveness of chest radiography as a screening test for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among the Bangkok elderly.

J Med Assoc Thai 2003 Nov;86(11):1042-50

Division of Respiratory Disease and Tuberculosis, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Regular screening with chest radiography (CXR) in an annual physical check up of the elderly is most frequently practiced. This study aimed to identify the CXR indices and the cost-effectiveness of CXR as a screening test for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) among the elderly in 124 urban communities of Bangkok around Siriraj Hospital. The gold standard for diagnosing COPD followed the guidelines of the Thoracic Society of Thailand. There were 3,094 subjects who participated, completed spirometry and a CXR. The selected nine indices from PA and lateral CXR for diagnosing COPD were based on the presence of hyperinflation. The positive criteria of each index were reported. The cut-off point of best average accuracy ie, Z score of the CXR was 0.07 with a sensitivity of 75.9 per cent (95% CI 70.2-81.6%), specificity of 72.4 per cent (95% CI 70.8-74.0%) and the best average accuracy of 74.1 per cent (95% CI 72.5-75.7%) whereas the cost-effective cut-off point of a Z score of CXR as a screening test for COPD was 0.04 at the lowest grand total cost. The cost to detect one case of COPD was 2,008 baht and needed to screen 17 elderly. It is suggested that CXR is probably not a suitable screening test for COPD in the elderly due to the complicated derivation of the CXR indices. However, its efficacy may be of some value in in-office diagnosis of COPD.
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November 2003

The cost-effectiveness of a questionnaire as a screening test for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among the Bangkok elderly.

J Med Assoc Thai 2003 Nov;86(11):1033-41

Division of Respiratory Disease and Tuberculosis, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

This study aimed to explore the cost-effectiveness of using a questionnaire as a screening test for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) among the Bangkok elderly residing around Siriraj Hospital. The gold standard used for diagnosing COPD followed the guidelines of the Thoracic Society of Thailand. The questionnaire consisted of 10 questions on smoking status, respiratory symptoms and previous history of pulmonary tuberculosis. There were 3,094 elderly who participated, completed the questionnaire, and underwent spirometry as well as chest radiography in the community. The results showed that elderly individuals who are smokers (> 0.5 pack-year) or have ever experienced sudden cough with chest oppression or dyspnea when the weather changes or who have expectorated more than two tablespoons of sputum would be suspected of having COPD with a sensitiviy of 81.4 per cent (95% CI 79.4-83.4), specificity of 62.2 per cent (95% CI 60.4-64.0) false negative rate 1.2 per cent (95% CI 0.7-1.7) and false positive rate 38 per cent (95% CI 35.3-40.7) and subsequently required spirometry and chest X-ray for definitive diagnosis. The test needed to screen 17 elderly individuals to detect one COPD case at a cost of 1,538 baht. This questionnaire is also a self-assessment tool for COPD screening among the elderly in order to encourage them to seek for early medical attention and it is recommended that this should be publicized via the mass media.
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November 2003

Economic evaluation of influenza vaccination in Thai chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

J Med Assoc Thai 2003 Jun;86(6):497-508

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Unlabelled: To determine the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of influenza vaccination in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients the authors conducted a stratified randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial from June 1997 to November 1998 at a university hospital in Thailand. A total of 125 COPD patients were stratified based on their FEV1 as mild COPD (FEV1 > or = 70% predicted), moderate COPD (FEV1 50-69% predicted) and severe COPD (FEV1 < 50% predicted) and in each severity stratum they were randomized to the vaccine group (received intramuscular injection with purified trivalent split-virus vaccine containing A/Texas/36/91 (H1N1), A/Nanchang 1933/95 (H3N2) and B/Harbin 107/94) or the placebo group (received intramuscular injection with vit B1). Number of episodes of acute respiratory illness (ARI) related to influenza (clinical ARI + a serum hemagglutination inhibition antibody titre of 38 or greater and a four fold titre increase in convalescent serum compared to acute serum) as well as severity of each ARI (outpatient treatment, hospitalization or required mechanical ventilation) and costs of treatment (direct medical costs comprised real drug costs from the hospital dispensary in outpatient cases and real charges in hospitalization cases) were collected and analyzed for the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of influenza vaccination. The incidence of influenza-related ARI in the study year was 27 per cent in the placebo group and 6.4 per cent in the vaccine group (relative risk [RR] 0.24, vaccine effectiveness 76%). The incidence was 27.3 per cent, 23.5 per cent and 29.2 per cent in mild, moderate and severe COPD respectively in the placebo group and 4.3 per cent, 12.5 per cent, and 4.3 per cent in the mild, moderate and severe COPD respectively in the vaccine group (RR 0.16, 0.53 and 0.15; vaccine effectiveness 84%, 47%, and 85% respectively). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios demonstrated that for every 100 patients with mild COPD whom the authors decided to vaccinate, the cost would be 24,840 baht more and would prevent 18.2 outpatients, 4.8 hospitalizations and 0 patient from mechanical ventilation due to ARI related to influenza. Likewise, the authors would have prevented 5.1 outpatients, 5.9 hospitalizations, 5.9 mechanical ventilation and 20.8 outpatients, 3.9 hospitalizations, 8.3 mechanical ventilation for every 100 moderate COPD and every 100 severe COPD patients vaccinated respectively. More than 90 per cent of the costs of treatment of influenza-related ARI were costs of hospitalization and for patients with moderate and severe airflow obstruction, more than 90 per cent of these costs were attributed to the costs of treating the patients who required mechanical ventilation. Predicted cost savings for every 100 mild COPD, 100 moderate COPD and 100 severe COPD patients vaccinated were 125,629 baht, 538,184.3 baht, and 680,647.1 baht respectively.

In Conclusion: Influenza vaccination is highly effective in the prevention of acute respiratory illness related to influenza virus infection in COPD, regardless of severity of airflow obstruction. Vaccination is more cost-effective in preventing mechanical ventilation episodes and more cost-benefit in patients with more severe airflow obstruction. Influenza vaccination should be recommended to all patients with COPD with the higher priority provided to patients with more severe airflow obstruction.
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June 2003

The risk and effectiveness of transurethral resection of prostate.

J Med Assoc Thai 2002 Dec;85(12):1288-95

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Background: To advise a patient to have transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) needs information on the benefit and complications of the procedure. Quality assurance also needs present results to be compared with future ones.

Objectives: The authors wanted to know: 1. Whether TURP can decrease theInternational prostate symptom score (IPSS) and improve the Quality of Life (QOL) scores concerning urination at 1.5 months post-operatively for at least 25 per cent of the pre-operative scores?; 2. What are the common medical diseases in this type of patient?; and 3. What are the mortality and immediate complications of TURPF?

Method: This was a prospective, before-after design trial. All patients who came to have TURP at a tertiary care hospital were studied. IPSS and QOL scores were recorded before surgery and again when the patients came back to follow up at 1.5 months after discharge. Patients were evaluated for cardiopulmonary reserve and congestive heart failure. Anesthetic technique of choice was spinal anesthesia with 0.5 per cent bupivacaine. Anesthetic and surgical complications were recorded if the definitions were met.

Analysis: Pre-operative and 1.5 months post-operative scores were compared using paired t-test and 95 per cent confidence interval.

Results: During the 13 months there were 269 consecutive males who received TURP. The mean +/- SD age was 70.4 +/- 8.8 years (range 35-97). The mean difference between pre- and post-operative IPSS was 6.7 +/- 9.1 (95% CI 5.2-7.8). Quality of Life also improved, the mean difference between pre- and post-operative QOL was 3.2 +/- 1.6 (95% CI 2.9-3.5). Most patients had ASA class 2. Common pre-operative existing diseases were hypertension (31.6%), ischemic heart disease (18.2%), diabetes (15.6%), and COPD (7.1%). Anesthetic techniques were spinal block (77.3%), epidural block (5.9%), continuous epidural (11.2%), and general anesthesia (5.6%). Intra-operative complications were reported and T URsyndrome occurred in 1 patient (0.37%). There was one surgical death 3 days post-operation, due to septic shock probably from bowel perforation.

Conclusion: The patients' symptoms and quality of life significantly improved, but there was 1 surgical death and 1 TUR syndrome among 269.
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December 2002

The prevalence and incidence of COPD among urban older persons of Bangkok Metropolis.

J Med Assoc Thai 2002 Nov;85(11):1147-55

Division of Respiratory Disease and Tuberculosis, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

COPD substantially affects the national healthcare resource and healthcare cost especially among the older persons. Identifying the accurate prevalence and incidence reflects the scale of problem posed by COPD. This epidemiological study using the criteria for diagnosing COPD based on ratio of FEV1.0/FVC less than 70 per cent and the reversibility of less than 15 per cent increase of post bronchodilator FEV1.0 in the absence of parenchymal lesions and cardiomegaly in CXR (PA and lateral view) revealed the prevalence (1998) of COPD among the 3094 older persons aged 60 years and over in the communities of Bangkok Metropolis 10 km around Siriraj Hospital was 7.11 per cent (95% CI: 6.21-8.01), whereas the incidence (1999) of COPD was 3.63 per cent (95% CI: 2.83-4.43). Both the prevalence and the incidence were increased with increasing age. The disease occurred predominantly among male smokers. The distribution of mild : moderate : severe COPD in the prevalence study was 5.6:2.2:1. The current findings also suggest that tobacco smoking is the prime important cause of COPD and the indoor pollution especially cooking smoke is not significant. In particular, the unexpectedly high incidence compared with prevalence in this population probably represents the warning message to the national policy maker for prompt and effective health promotion and disease prevention to prevent further social and economic loss.
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November 2002

Perioperative cardiac arrest at Siriraj Hospital between 1999-2001.

J Med Assoc Thai 2002 Sep;85 Suppl 3:S993-9

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Cardiac arrest during the perioperative period is a good indicator of the quality of anesthetic management. The incidence of perioperative cardiac arrest in Siriraj Hospital hasn't been reported before. Our objectives were to determine the incidence of perioperative anesthesia-related cardiac arrest and the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in these cases in order to find out how to improve our anesthetic care. This prospective study was undertaken between 1999-2001 by sending a questionnaire to those witnessing a cardiac arrest. The incidence of perioperative cardiac arrest was 8.2:10,000 instances of anesthesia with a mortality of 5.6:10,000 within 48 hours of the arrest. The incidence of perioperative cardiac arrest that was related to anesthesia was 0.7:10,000 instances of anesthesia and the anesthesia related mortality was 0.19: 10,000 within 48 hours of arrest. Failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation occurred in of occasions 41.7 per cent. There was no difference between intraoperative and postoperative cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Twenty-one per cent of patients experiencing a cardiac arrest were discharged from hospital. Seventy-three per cent of events occurred in patients with an ASA rating 3-5 and most often the cause of arrest was massive or uncontrolled bleeding. In those patients with an ASA rating 1-2 there were no outstanding cause of arrest.
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September 2002

Anesthesiologist training, home or abroad?

J Med Assoc Thai 2002 Sep;85 Suppl 3:S893-6

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Anesthesiology training in various countries vary a lot in structure, manpower, duration, budget, material, and equipment. Training at home results in better understanding of local problems. Anesthesiologists in developing countries have to adapt and endure the challenge of training abroad. The results are knowledges in anesthesia, new techniques and equipment, new contacts and understanding of other way of life. But many countries have lost their anesthesiologists from emigration. Training abroad is useful only when the trainees bring the knowledge back home and help their countrymen.
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September 2002

Mental state change after general and regional anesthesia in adults and elderly patients, a randomized clinical trial.

J Med Assoc Thai 2002 Sep;85 Suppl 3:S875-83

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Background: Mental state changes after anesthesia seemed to be more frequent in older patients, but the results were still unclear.

Objective: To compare the mental scores between adults and elderly patients after general and regional anesthesia.

Methods: This was a stratified randomized trial with factorial design. Sixty patients > or = 60 years old and sixty patients < 60 years old were randomly assigned to receive general or regional anesthesia. Their mental states were assessed blind by investigators, using the Thai Mental State Examination score.

Results: The two anesthetic groups showed no difference in the mental scores, but the two age groups showed significantly different scores. The components of mental states that were significantly different were orientation and recall. There were no significant differences in registration, attention, calculation and language. The model for predicting the score included age, education level and narcotics given within six hours before assessment. Sex, weight, intraoperative hypotension, blood loss and duration of anesthesia could not explain the change in the scores.

Conclusion: Age, but not anesthetic technique, affected the mental scores after anesthesia.
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September 2002

A survey of the anesthesia scavenging systems in a teaching hospital.

J Med Assoc Thai 2002 Sep;85 Suppl 3:S824-9

Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Pollution by anesthetic gases can be a problem in operating theaters. More than 90 per cent of this pollution can be reduced by using a scavenging system. Such systems increase the complexity, and thus the hazards of administering anesthesia. A case of pneumothorax prompted an investigation of the active scavenging systems currently used in a teaching hospital by using a pre-use check up protocol. Thirty-eight closed-reservoir active scavenging systems were included. Ten systems (26.3%) were assembled incorrectly. All systems passed a negative pressure relief valve test. Seventeen systems (44.7%) failed to pass a positive pressure relief valve test because high pressure (over 10 cmH2O) developed during an O2 flush, but direct measurement of the pressure at the scavenging interface revealed that these defects were caused by a problem with the adjustable pressure limiting (APL) valves, not with the positive pressure relief valves of the system. We suggest that routine pre-use check up together with regular maintenance of equipment should be emphasized and all personnel should be encouraged to learn more about safety precautions.
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September 2002
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