Publications by authors named "Jared Steinklein"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A patient with concurrent multiple sclerosis and moyamoya disease.

Mult Scler Relat Disord 2021 Jul 16;54:103151. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Division of Neuro-Immunology, Department of Neurology, Lenox Hill Hospital, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Great Neck, NY. Electronic address:

Background: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare vasculopathy and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease which causes CNS demyelination. While most literature has focused on misdiagnosis of MMD as an "MS-mimic", we present a patient in which both co-existed.

Methods: Case Report RESULTS: A 57-year-old woman presented with gait dysfunction and paresthesias in both feet. MRI revealed brain and spinal cord lesions consistent with MS. Vessel imaging revealed multivessel stenosis consistent with MMD. Lumbar puncture demonstrated oligoclonal bands, leading to two diagnoses, MS and MMD.

Conclusions: MS can exist concurrently with MMD, potentially due to underlying propensity for autoimmunity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2021.103151DOI Listing
July 2021

Doing Great With DOTATATE: Update on GA-68 DOTATATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Evaluation of Sinonasal Tumors.

Top Magn Reson Imaging 2021 Jun;30(3):151-158

Department of Radiology, Northwell Health Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY.

Abstract: Sinonasal tumors are relatively rare and radiographically challenging to evaluate due to their wide variety of pathologies and imaging features. However, sinonasal tumors possessing somatostatin receptor overexpression have the benefit of utilizing a multimodality anatomic and functional imaging for a more comprehensive evaluation. This is particularly evident with esthesioneuroblastoma, with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging defining the anatomic extent of the tumor, whereas somatostatin receptor imaging, particularly with gallium-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography, is used to assess the presence of metastatic disease for staging purposes as well as in the surveillance for tumor recurrence. In addition, areas which accumulate gallium-68 DOTATATE are potentially amenable to treatment with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. In this manner, a combined approach of anatomic and functional imaging is critical for optimal imaging evaluation and treatment strategy of patients with sinonasal tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RMR.0000000000000289DOI Listing
June 2021

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in a Patient With Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Treated With Ocrelizumab Monotherapy.

JAMA Neurol 2021 Jun;78(6):736-740

Division of Neuro-Immunology, Department of Neurology, Lenox Hill Hospital, North Shore University Hospital, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New York, New York.

Importance: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an opportunistic infection caused by the JC virus that has no proven effective treatment. Although rare cases of PML have occurred with other anti-CD20 therapies, there had been no prior cases associated with ocrelizumab.

Objective: To report the first ever case of PML occurring with ocrelizumab monotherapy in a patient with progressive multiple sclerosis without prior immunomodulation.

Design, Setting, And Participant: This case was reported from an academic medical center. The patient had multiple sclerosis while receiving ocrelizumab monotherapy.

Exposures: Ocrelizumab monotherapy.

Results: A 78-year-old man with progressive multiple sclerosis treated with ocrelizumab monotherapy for 2 years presented with 2 weeks of progressive visual disturbance and confusion. Examination demonstrated a right homonymous hemianopia, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarging nonenhancing left parietal lesion without mass effect. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed 1000 copies/mL of JC virus, confirming the diagnosis of PML. Blood work on diagnosis revealed grade 2 lymphopenia, with absolute lymphocyte count of 710/μL, CD4 of 294/μL (reference range, 325-1251/μL), CD8 of 85/μL (reference range, 90-775/μL), CD19 of 1/μL, preserved CD4/CD8 ratio (3.45), and negative HIV serology. Retrospective absolute lymphocyte count revealed intermittent grade 1 lymphopenia that preceded ocrelizumab (absolute lymphocyte count range, 800-1200/μL). The patient's symptoms progressed over weeks to involve bilateral visual loss, right-sided facial droop, and dysphasia. Ocrelizumab was discontinued and off-label pembrolizumab treatment was initiated. The patient nevertheless declined rapidly and ultimately died. PML was confirmed at autopsy.

Conclusions And Relevance: In this case report, PML occurrence was likely a result of the immunomodulatory function of ocrelizumab as well as age-related immunosenescence. This case report emphasizes the importance of a thorough discussion of the risks and benefits of ocrelizumab, especially in patients at higher risk for infections such as elderly patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.0627DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967248PMC
June 2021

Imaging of Vascular Lesions of the Head and Neck.

Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2018 Feb;51(1):55-76

Department of Radiology, Lenox Hill Hospital, 100 East 77th Street, Radiology 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10075, USA. Electronic address:

This article provides an overview of imaging findings of common and uncommon vascular lesions in the head and neck and showcases images highlighting imaging findings. Both hemangiomas and vascular malformations are covered.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otc.2017.09.007DOI Listing
February 2018

Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases and apparent treatment volumes.

J Neurosurg 2016 Feb 11;124(2):489-95. Epub 2015 Sep 11.

Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Health System, Lake Success, New York.

Objective: Contrast-enhanced MRI is the preeminent diagnostic test for brain metastasis (BM). Detection of BMs for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning may improve with a time delay following administration of a high-relaxivity agent for 1.5-T and 3-T imaging systems. Metastasis detection with time-delayed MRI was evaluated in this study.

Methods: Fifty-three volumetric MRI studies from 38 patients undergoing SRS for BMs were evaluated. All studies used 0.1-mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance; Bracco Diagnostics) immediately after injection, followed by 2 more axial T1-weighted sequences after 5-minute intervals (final image acquisition commenced 15 minutes after contrast injection). Two studies were motion limited and excluded. Two hundred eighty-seven BMs were identified. The studies were randomized and examined separately by 3 radiologists, who were blinded to the temporal sequence. Each radiologist recorded the number of BMs detected per scan. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test compared BM numbers between scans. One radiologist determined the scan on which BMs were best defined. All confirmed, visible tumors were contoured using iPlan RT treatment planning software on each of the 3 MRI data sets. A linear mixed model was used to analyze volume changes.

Results: The interclass correlations for Scans 1, 2, and 3 were 0.7392, 0.7951, and 0.7290, respectively, demonstrating excellent interrater reliability. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the second scan as compared with the first in 35.3% of subjects (95% CI 22.4%-49.9%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 1 and 2 ranged from 1 to 10. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the third scan as compared with the second in 21.6% of subjects (95% CI 11.3%-35.3%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 2 and 3 ranged from 1 to 9. Between Scans 1 and 3, additional tumors were seen on 43.1% of scans (increase ranged from 1 to 14). The median increase in tumor number for all comparisons was 1. There was a significant increase in number of BMs detected from Scan 1 to Scan 2 (p < 0.0367) and from Scan 1 to Scan 3 (p < 0.0264). In 34 of the 51 subjects (66.7%), the radiologist selected the third scan as the one providing the clearest tumor definition. There was an average 25.4% increase in BM volume between Scans 1 and 2 (p < 0.0001) and a 9% increase in BM volume between Scans 2 and 3 (p = 0.0001).

Conclusions: In patients who are being prepared for SRS of BMs, delayed MRI after contrast injection revealed more targets that needed treatment. In addition, apparent treatment volumes increased with a time delay. To avoid missing tumors that could be treated at the time of planned SRS and resultant "treatment failures," the authors recommend that postcontrast MR images be acquired between 10 and 15 minutes after injection in patients undergoing SRS for treatment of BMs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2015.2.JNS141993DOI Listing
February 2016

Dental anatomy and pathology encountered on routine CT of the head and neck.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2013 Dec;201(6):W843-53

1 Both authors: Department of Radiology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, 270-05 76th Ave, Ste C204, New Hyde Park, NY 11040.

Objective: Although dental CT is not routinely performed at hospital imaging centers, dental and periodontal disease can be recognized on standard high-resolution CT of the neck and face. These findings can have significant implications with regard to not only dental disease, but also diseases of the sinuses, jaw, and surrounding soft tissues. This article serves to review dental and periodontal anatomy and pathology as well as other regional entities with dental involvement and to discuss the imaging findings.

Conclusion: Recognition of dental and periodontal disease has the potential to affect management and preclude further complications, thereby preserving the smile, one of the most recognizable and attractive features of the human face and, unfortunately, often disease ridden. Although practicing good oral hygiene and visiting the dentist for regular examinations and cleanings are the most effective ways to prevent disease, some patients do not take these preventative measures. Thus, radiologists play a role in diagnosing dental disease and complications such as chronic periodontitis and abscesses, nonhealing fractures and osteomyelitis, oroantral fistulas, tumoral diseases, osteonecrosis of the jaw, and other conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.12.9616DOI Listing
December 2013
-->