Publications by authors named "Janneke M Stapelbroek"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Loss of syntaxin 3 causes variant microvillus inclusion disease.

Gastroenterology 2014 Jul 12;147(1):65-68.e10. Epub 2014 Apr 12.

Division of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a disorder of intestinal epithelial differentiation characterized by life-threatening intractable diarrhea. MVID can be diagnosed based on loss of microvilli, microvillus inclusions, and accumulation of subapical vesicles. Most patients with MVID have mutations in myosin Vb that cause defects in recycling of apical vesicles. Whole-exome sequencing of DNA from patients with variant MVID showed homozygous truncating mutations in syntaxin 3 (STX3). STX3 is an apical receptor involved in membrane fusion of apical vesicles in enterocytes. Patient-derived organoid cultures and overexpression of truncated STX3 in Caco-2 cells recapitulated most characteristics of variant MVID. We conclude that loss of STX3 function causes variant MVID.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2014.04.002DOI Listing
July 2014

Mutational analysis of ATP8B1 in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

PLoS One 2013 19;8(11):e80553. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands ; Department of Metabolic Diseases, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Mutations in genes encoding cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (SPINK1) and chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC) are associated with chronic pancreatitis. However, in many patients with a familial chronic pancreatitis pattern suggesting a genetic cause, no mutations in either of these genes can be found, indicating that other, still unknown, associated genes exist. In this respect ATP8B1 is an interesting candidate due to its strong expression in the pancreas, its supposed general function in membrane organization and the higher incidence of pancreatitis in patients with ATP8B1 deficiency.

Methods: We analyzed all 27 ATP8B1 coding exons and adjacent non-coding sequences of 507 chronic pancreatitis patients by direct sequencing. Exons that harbored possible relevant variations were subsequently sequenced in 1,027 healthy controls.

Results: In the exonic regions, 5 novel non-synonymous alterations were detected as well as 14 previously described alterations of which some were associated with ATP8B1 deficiency. However, allele frequencies for any of these variations did not significantly differ between patients and controls. Furthermore, several non-synonymous variants were exclusively detected in control subjects and multiple variants in the non-coding sequence were identified with similar frequencies in both groups.

Conclusions: We did not find an association between heterozygous ATP8B1 variants and chronic pancreatitis in our cohort of patients with hereditary and idiopathic chronic pancreatitis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0080553PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3834041PMC
August 2014

Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation and FXR genetic variation in inflammatory bowel disease.

PLoS One 2011 22;6(8):e23745. Epub 2011 Aug 22.

Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: We previously showed that activation of the bile salt nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) protects against intestinal inflammation in mice. Reciprocally, these inflammatory mediators may decrease FXR activation. We investigated whether FXR activation is repressed in the ileum and colon of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in remission. Additionally, we evaluated whether genetic variation in FXR is associated with IBD.

Methods: mRNA expression of FXR and FXR target gene SHP was determined in ileal and colonic biopsies of patients with Crohn's colitis (n = 15) and ulcerative colitis (UC; n = 12), all in clinical remission, and healthy controls (n = 17). Seven common tagging SNPs and two functional SNPs in FXR were genotyped in 2355 Dutch IBD patients (1162 Crohn's disease (CD) and 1193 UC) and in 853 healthy controls.

Results: mRNA expression of SHP in the ileum is reduced in patients with Crohn's colitis but not in patients with UC compared to controls. mRNA expression of villus marker Villin was correlated with FXR and SHP in healthy controls, a correlation that was weaker in UC patients and absent in CD patients. None of the SNPs was associated with IBD, UC or CD, nor with clinical subgroups of CD.

Conclusions: FXR activation in the ileum is decreased in patients with Crohn's colitis. This may be secondary to altered enterohepatic circulation of bile salts or transrepression by inflammatory signals but does not seem to be caused by the studied SNPs in FXR. Increasing FXR activity by synthetic FXR agonists may have benefit in CD patients.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0023745PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3161760PMC
February 2012

Familial cholestasis: progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2010 Oct;24(5):541-53

Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology (KE.01.144.3), Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Post-Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) type 1, 2 and 3 are due to mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11 and ABCB4, respectively. Each of these genes encodes a hepatocanalicular transporter, which is essential for the proper formation of bile. Mutations in ABCB4 can result in progressive cholestatic disease, while mutations in ATP8B1 and ABCB11 can result both in episodic cholestasis, referred to as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) type 1 and 2, as well as in progressive cholestatic disease. This suggests a clinical continuum and these diseases are therefore preferably referred to as ATP8B1 deficiency and ABCB11 deficiency. Similarly PFIC type 3 is designated as ABCB4 deficiency. Heterozygous mutations in each of these transporters can also be associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical features and current as well as future therapeutic options for progressive familial- and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis as well as intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpg.2010.07.010DOI Listing
October 2010

Liver disease associated with canalicular transport defects: current and future therapies.

J Hepatol 2010 Feb 21;52(2):258-71. Epub 2009 Nov 21.

Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Bile formation at the canalicular membrane is a delicate process. This is illustrated by inherited liver diseases due to mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11, ABCB4, ABCC2 and ABCG5/8, all encoding hepatocanalicular transporters. Effective treatment of these canalicular transport defects is a clinical and scientific challenge that is still ongoing. Current evidence indicates that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can be effective in selected patients with PFIC3 (ABCB4 deficiency), while rifampicin reduces pruritus in patients with PFIC1 (ATP8B1 deficiency) and PFIC2 (ABCB11 deficiency), and might abort cholestatic episodes in BRIC (mild ATP8B1 or ABCB11 deficiency). Cholestyramine is essential in the treatment of sitosterolemia (ABCG5/8 deficiency). Most patients with PFIC1 and PFIC2 will benefit from partial biliary drainage. Nevertheless liver transplantation is needed in a substantial proportion of these patients, as it is in PFIC3 patients. New developments in the treatment of canalicular transport defects by using nuclear receptors as a target, enhancing the expression of the mutated transporter protein by employing chaperones, or by mutation specific therapy show substantial promise. This review will focus on the therapy that is currently available as well as on those developments that are likely to influence clinical practice in the near future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2009.11.012DOI Listing
February 2010

Reduced expression of ATP7B affected by Wilson disease-causing mutations is rescued by pharmacological folding chaperones 4-phenylbutyrate and curcumin.

Hepatology 2009 Dec;50(6):1783-95

Department of Metabolic and Endocrine Diseases, University Medical Center Utrecht, and the Netherlands Metabolomics Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Unlabelled: Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive copper overload disorder of the liver and basal ganglia. WD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding ATP7B, a protein localized to the trans-Golgi network that primarily facilitates hepatic copper excretion. Current treatment comprises reduction of circulating copper by zinc supplementation or copper chelation. Despite treatment, a significant number of patients have neurological deterioration. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that defects arising from some WD mutations are ameliorated by drug treatment aimed at improvement of protein folding and restoration of protein function. This necessitated systematic characterization of the molecular consequences of distinct ATP7B missense mutations associated with WD. With the exception of p.S1363F, all mutations tested (p.G85V, p.R778L, p.H1069Q, p.C1104F, p.V1262F, p.G1343V, and p.S1363F) resulted in reduced ATP7B protein expression, whereas messenger RNA abundance was unaffected. Retention of mutant ATP7B in the endoplasmic reticulum, increased protein expression, and normalization of localization after culturing cells at 30 degrees C, and homology modeling suggested that these proteins were misfolded. Four distinct mutations exhibited residual copper export capacity, whereas other mutations resulted in complete disruption of copper export by ATP7B. Treatment with pharmacological chaperones 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) and curcumin, a clinically approved compound, partially restored protein expression of most ATP7B mutants.

Conclusion: These findings might enable novel treatment strategies in WD by directly enhancing the protein expression of mutant ATP7B with residual copper export activity. 1795.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.23209DOI Listing
December 2009

Folding defects in P-type ATP 8B1 associated with hereditary cholestasis are ameliorated by 4-phenylbutyrate.

Hepatology 2010 Jan;51(1):286-96

Department of Metabolic and Endocrine Diseases, University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Unlabelled: Deficiency in P-type ATP8B1 is a severe and clinically highly variable hereditary disorder that is primarily characterized by intrahepatic cholestasis. It presents either as a progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 [PFIC1]) or intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 [BRIC1]) disease. ATP8B1 deficiency is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the gene encoding ATP8B1, a putative aminophospholipid-translocating P-type adenosine triphosphatase. The exact pathogenesis of the disease is elusive, and no effective pharmacological therapy is currently available. Here, the molecular consequences of six distinct ATP8B1 missense mutations (p.L127P, p.G308V, p.D454G, p.D554N, p.I661T, and p.G1040R) and one nonsense mutation (p.R1164X) associated with PFIC1 and/or BRIC1 were systematically characterized. Except for the p.L127P mutation, all mutations resulted in markedly reduced ATP8B1 protein expression, whereas messenger RNA expression was unaffected. Five of seven mutations resulted in (partial) retention of ATP8B1 in the endoplasmic reticulum. Reduced protein expression was partially restored by culturing the cells at 30 degrees C and by treatment with proteasomal inhibitors, indicating protein misfolding and subsequent proteosomal degradation. Protein misfolding was corroborated by predicting the consequences of most mutations onto a homology model of ATP8B1. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate, a clinically approved pharmacological chaperone, partially restored defects in expression and localization of ATP8B1 substitutions G308V, D454G, D554N, and in particular I661T, which is the most frequently identified mutation in BRIC1.

Conclusion: A surprisingly large proportion of ATP8B1 mutations resulted in aberrant folding and decreased expression at the plasma membrane. These effects were partially restored by treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate. We propose that treatment with pharmacological chaperones may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the recurrent attacks of cholestasis in patients with intermittent (BRIC1) disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.23268DOI Listing
January 2010

ATP8B1 is essential for maintaining normal hearing.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2009 Jun 28;106(24):9709-14. Epub 2009 May 28.

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ATP8B1 deficiency is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP8B1, which encodes the putative phospatidylserine flippase ATP8B1 (formerly called FIC1). ATP8B1 deficiency is primarily characterized by cholestasis, but extrahepatic symptoms are also found. Because patients sometimes report reduced hearing capability, we investigated the role of ATP8B1 in auditory function. Here we show that ATP8B1/Atp8b1 deficiency, both in patients and in Atp8b1(G308V/G308V) mutant mice, causes hearing loss, associated with progressive degeneration of cochlear hair cells. Atp8b1 is specifically localized in the stereocilia of these hair cells. This indicates that the mechanosensory function and integrity of the cochlear hair cells is critically dependent on ATP8B1 activity, possibly through maintaining lipid asymmetry in the cellular membranes of stereocilia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0807919106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2700994PMC
June 2009

Nasobiliary drainage induces long-lasting remission in benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis.

Hepatology 2006 Jan;43(1):51-3

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) is characterized by episodic cholestasis and pruritus without anatomical obstruction. Effective medical treatment is not available. We report complete and long-lasting disappearance of pruritus and normalization of serum bile salt concentrations in cholestatic BRIC patients within 24 hours after endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (NBD). Relative amounts of phospholipids and bile salts in bile collected during NBD appeared to be normal, but phospholipids other than phosphatidylcholine (especially sphingomyelin) were increased. In conclusion, we propose that temporary endoscopic nasobiliary drainage should be considered in cholestatic BRIC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.20998DOI Listing
January 2006

The H1069Q mutation in ATP7B is associated with late and neurologic presentation in Wilson disease: results of a meta-analysis.

J Hepatol 2004 Nov;41(5):758-63

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85090, 3508 AB Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background And Aims: Wilson disease is an hereditary disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene, and leading to hepatic or neurologic disease. We examined whether H1069Q, the most common ATP7B mutation, is associated with a specific phenotype.

Methods: Genotyping results in 70 Dutch patients were related to clinical presentation. Subsequently a meta-analysis for genotype-phenotype correlation was performed on all patients available from literature, combined with the current Dutch group, a total of 577 patients.

Results: The Dutch patients homozygous or heterozygous for the H1069Q mutation presented more frequently with neurologic disease (63% and 43% vs. 15%), and at a later age (20.9 and 15.9 vs. 12.6 years) than patients without the H1069Q mutation. In the meta-analysis the odds-ratio for neurologic presentation in homozygous or heterozygous H1069Q vs. non-H1069Q patients was 3.50 (95% CI 2.01-6.09) and 2.13 (95% CI 1.18-3.83), respectively. Age at presentation was 21.1, 19.2 and 16.5 years, respectively, corresponding to a weighted mean difference (WMD) of 4.41 (95% CI 1.56-7.26) for homozygous H1069Q vs. heterozygous patients and 6.68 (95% CI 4.33-9.38) for homozygous H1069Q vs. non-H1069Q patients.

Conclusions: Our results indicate that the H1069Q mutation is associated with a late and neurologic presentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2004.07.017DOI Listing
November 2004

Mutations in VPS33B, encoding a regulator of SNARE-dependent membrane fusion, cause arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome.

Nat Genet 2004 Apr 28;36(4):400-4. Epub 2004 Mar 28.

Section of Medical and Molecular Genetics, University of Birmingham, and Liver Unit, Birmingham Children's Hospital, UK.

ARC syndrome (OMIM 208085) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by neurogenic arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, renal tubular dysfunction and neonatal cholestasis with bile duct hypoplasia and low gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (gGT) activity. Platelet dysfunction is common. Affected infants do not thrive and usually die in the first year of life. To elucidate the molecular basis of ARC, we mapped the disease to a 7-cM interval on 15q26.1 and then identified germline mutations in the gene VPS33B in 14 kindreds with ARC. VPS33B encodes a homolog of the class C yeast vacuolar protein sorting gene, Vps33, that contains a Sec1-like domain important in the regulation of vesicle-to-target SNARE complex formation and subsequent membrane fusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng1325DOI Listing
April 2004