Publications by authors named "Janina Z Costa"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Detection of Betanodavirus in experimentally infected European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax, Linnaeus 1758) using non-lethal sampling methods.

J Fish Dis 2019 Aug 10;42(8):1097-1105. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

MARE - Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ESTM, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Peniche, Portugal.

One of the major disease threats affecting the Mediterranean aquaculture industry is viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER). The target organs for Betanodavirus detection are the brain and eyes, obtained through lethal sampling. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and suitability of non-lethal samples for detecting Betanodavirus in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). European seabass juveniles were infected with Betanodavirus, by either an intramuscular injection or immersion (10 TCID /ml and 10 TCID /ml, respectively), and samples collected 7, 15 and 30 days post-infection (dpi). The brain was collected as a lethal sample, and gills, caudal fin and blood as non-lethal tissues for detecting Betanodavirus by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). The presence of virus in non-lethal tissues was inconsistent, with lower viral loads than in the brain. For blood, higher viral loads were detected in intramuscular-infected fish at 15 dpi until the end of the challenge. Serum antibodies against Betanodavirus were assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies were detected as early as 7 dpi, with higher mean antibody titres at 15 and 30 dpi. The presence of Betanodavirus-specific antibodies indicates that this is a suitable evaluation method for detecting early stages of the infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfd.13015DOI Listing
August 2019

Complete Genome Sequences of Three Fish-Associated Isolates.

Genome Announc 2018 Feb 8;6(6). Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Aquaculture Research Group, Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik, United Kingdom.

The whole-genome sequences are described here for three group B (GBS) () serotype Ib isolates obtained from tilapia () farmed at sites in Honduras, Costa Rica, and the United States. The bacteria were isolated from the brains of fish displaying signs of streptococcosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00025-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805872PMC
February 2018

Complete Genome Sequences of Three Serotype Ia Isolates Obtained from Disease Outbreaks in Nile Tilapia ().

Genome Announc 2018 Jan 4;6(1). Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Aquaculture Research Group, Moredun Research Institute, Bush Loan, Penicuik, United Kingdom.

This paper describes the whole-genome sequences for three serotype Ia isolates. The isolates were recovered from the brains of clinically sick tilapia, , that were suffering from streptococcosis. One isolate was from tilapia in the United States and the other two from fish in China.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.01432-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5754503PMC
January 2018

Understanding the interaction between Betanodavirus and its host for the development of prophylactic measures for viral encephalopathy and retinopathy.

Fish Shellfish Immunol 2016 Jun 17;53:35-49. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Penicuik, Scotland, EH26 0PZ, United Kingdom.

Over the last three decades, the causative agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) disease has become a serious problem of marine finfish aquaculture, and more recently the disease has also been associated with farmed freshwater fish. The virus has been classified as a Betanodavirus within the family Nodaviridae, and the fact that Betanodaviruses are known to affect more than 120 different farmed and wild fish and invertebrate species, highlights the risk that Betanodaviruses pose to global aquaculture production. Betanodaviruses have been clustered into four genotypes, based on the RNA sequence of the T4 variable region of their capsid protein, and are named after the fish species from which they were first derived i.e. Striped Jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV), Tiger puffer nervous necrosis virus (TPNNV), Barfin flounder nervous necrosis virus (BFNNV) and Red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), while an additional genotype turbot betanodavirus strain (TNV) has also been proposed. However, these genotypes tend to be associated with a particular water temperature range rather than being species-specific. Larvae and juvenile fish are especially susceptible to VER, with up to 100% mortality resulting in these age groups during disease episodes, with vertical transmission of the virus increasing the disease problem in smaller fish. A number of vaccine preparations have been tested in the laboratory and in the field e.g. inactivated virus, recombinant proteins, virus-like particles and DNA based vaccines, and their efficacy, based on relative percentage survival, has ranged from medium to high levels of protection to little or no protection. Ultimately a combination of effective prophylactic measures, including vaccination, is needed to control VER, and should also target larvae and broodstock stages of production to help the industry deal with the problem of vertical transmission. As yet there are no commercial vaccines for VER and the aquaculture industry eagerly awaits such a product. In this review we provide an overview on the current state of knowledge of the disease, the pathogen, and interactions between betanodavirus and its host, to provide a greater understanding of the multiple factors involved in the disease process. Such knowledge is needed to develop effective methods for controlling VER in the field, to protect the various aquaculture species farmed globally from the different Betanodavirus genotypes to which they are susceptible.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsi.2016.03.033DOI Listing
June 2016