Publications by authors named "Janice M Wilson"

9 Publications

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Validation of a Novel Cutaneous Neoplasm Diagnostic Self-Efficacy Instrument (CNDSEI) for Evaluating User-Perceived Confidence With Dermoscopy.

Dermatol Pract Concept 2020 Oct 26;10(4):e2020088. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Background: Accurate medical image interpretation is an essential proficiency for multiple medical specialties, including dermatologists and primary care providers. A dermatoscope, a ×10-×20 magnifying lens paired with a light source, enables enhanced visualization of skin cancer structures beyond standard visual inspection. Skilled interpretation of dermoscopic images improves diagnostic accuracy for skin cancer.

Objective: Design and validation of Cutaneous Neoplasm Diagnostic Self-Efficacy Instrument (CNDSEI)-a new tool to assess dermatology residents' confidence in dermoscopic diagnosis of skin tumors.

Methods: In the 2018-2019 academic year, the authors administered the CNDSEI and the Long Dermoscopy Assessment (LDA), to measure dermoscopic image interpretation accuracy, to residents in 9 dermatology residency programs prior to dermoscopy educational intervention exposure. The authors conducted CNDSEI item analysis with inspection of response distribution histograms, assessed internal reliability using Cronbach's coefficient alpha (α) and construct validity by comparing baseline CNDSEI and LDA results for corresponding lesions with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Results: At baseline, residents respectively demonstrated significantly higher and lower CNDSEI scores for correctly and incorrectly diagnosed lesions on the LDA (P = 0.001). The internal consistency reliability of CNDSEI responses for the majority (13/15) of the lesion types was excellent (α ≥ 0.9) or good (0.8≥ α <0.9).

Conclusions: The CNDSEI pilot established that the tool reliably measures user dermoscopic image interpretation confidence and that self-efficacy correlates with diagnostic accuracy. Precise alignment of medical image diagnostic performance and the self-efficacy instrument content offers opportunity for construct validation of novel medical image interpretation self-efficacy instruments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5826/dpc.1004a88DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7588154PMC
October 2020

Eruption of squamous cell carcinomas after beginning nilotinib therapy.

Dermatol Online J 2020 Jun 15;26(6). Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX.

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by a reciprocal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22 leading to the formation of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the treatment of choice for patients diagnosed with CML and have many associated side effects including the rarely-reported eruption of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Herein, we report a patient with CML who presented with sudden onset of multiple scaly lesions on his legs and trunk after beginning treatment with nilotinib, a novel TKI. Six biopsies were performed at his initial presentation and four of these lesions were confirmed to be keratoacanthoma-type SCCs. One month later, the patient reported the development of multiple new similar lesions on his legs, arms, and face. Four more biopsies were performed revealing keratoacanthoma-type and well-differentiated SCCs. Certain tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as sorafenib and quizartinib have been reported to cause eruptive keratoacanthoma (KA)-type SCCs as seen in our patient. However, there is only one other report in the literature of nilotinib promoting the development of SCCs or KAs. Physicians should be aware of this potential adverse effect and patients taking nilotinib should be closely monitored by a dermatologist.
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June 2020

Online Skin Disease Hoaxes: Widespread and Credible to Viewers.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Jun 22. Epub 2019 Jun 22.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.06.036DOI Listing
June 2019

Telementoring and smartphone-based answering systems to optimize dermatology resident dermoscopy education.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Aug 29;81(2):e27-e28. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.01.045DOI Listing
August 2019

Trypophobia, skin, and media.

Dermatol Online J 2018 Nov 15;24(11). Epub 2018 Nov 15.

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas.

Trypophobia is the fear of patterns of clustered holes, bumps, or nodules. Trypophobia has a special relationship with dermatology because of its effects on individuals with skin disease, its relationship with disease avoiding behavior, and its utilization in many online skin disease hoaxes. Trypophobic patterns on skin and characters can be found in movies, TV shows, and videogames. Several popular horror villains take advantage of trypophobic patterns like Freddy Kreuger, Jason Vorhees, and Pinhead. Most recently, another blockbuster villain has joined their ranks - Killmonger. Public health messaging about these biases and the often noncontagious nature of skin disease is warranted to attenuate public stigma of skin disease perpetuated by media.
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November 2018

Retrospective effects of the American Joint Committee on Cancer's eighth edition guidelines for staging melanoma.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2018 01;78(1):177-178

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.07.001DOI Listing
January 2018

New antibiotic therapies for acne and rosacea.

Dermatol Ther 2012 Jan-Feb;25(1):23-37

Center for Clinical Studies, Webster, Texas 77598, USA.

Acne and rosacea compromise a substantial portion of the dermatology clinical practice. Over the past century, many treatment modalities have been introduced with antibiotics playing a major role. Today, both oral and topical antibiotics are used in the management of acne and rosacea, with several novel formulations and/or combination regimens recently introduced. The latest studies suggest anti-inflammatory actions to be the most likely mechanism of antibiotics in acne and rosacea, shifting the focus to subantimicrobial-dose oral antibiotics and/or topical antibiotic regimens as the preferred first-line agents. Here we will discuss the most recent oral and topical antibiotic therapies available for treatment of acne and rosacea, with special focus on efficacy data, indication, dosing, and mechanism of action.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1529-8019.2012.01497.xDOI Listing
September 2012

Persistent erythematous plaque after minor trauma in an immunocompromised woman.

Dermatol Online J 2012 Apr 15;18(4). Epub 2012 Apr 15.

Center for Clinical Studies, Webster, Texas, USA.

Scedosporium apiospermum is a ubiquitous soil fungus with a worldwide distribution. It can cause a wide range of clinical disease, from cutaneous and subcutaneous infections, to pneumonia, brain abscess, and life threatening systemic illness. The diagnosis of cutaneous disease is with biopsy and culture. We discuss the case of an elderly immunocompromised woman who presented with a persistent erythematous plaque on the elbow after minor trauma. A biopsy revealed Scedosporium apiospermum. Treatment usually requires surgical resection in conjunction with antifungal therapy.
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April 2012

Serum leptin levels, bone mineral density and osteoblast alkaline phosphatase activity in elderly men and women.

Mech Ageing Dev 2003 Mar;124(3):281-6

Medical Laboratory Sciences, Department of Pathology, HSSB Room 220, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM 87131-5651, USA.

Although primarily secreted by adipose cells, leptin, a polypeptide hormone that influences body weight, satiety and lipid metabolism, and its receptor are also expressed in human osteoblasts. Leptin plays a role in the central, hypothalamic modulation of bone formation, as well as locally within the skeleton by enhancing differentiation of bone marrow stroma into osteoblasts and inhibiting its differentiation into osteoclasts and adipocytes. The purpose of this investigation was to compare serum leptin values in 100 postmenopausal women (age 62-97) and 31 men (age 72-92) to bone mineral density (BMD) measurements made by dual X-ray absorptiometry and additionally to biochemical markers of bone resorption and formation, including crosslinked collagen N-telopeptides (NTx), aminoterminal extension procollagen propeptides (PINP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bAP). The circulating level of leptin directly correlated with body mass index (BMI) (r=0.61-0.78, P<0.001) and was modestly, but significantly and positively associated with bAP activity (r=0.24-0.33, P<0.01) in the sera of men and women after adjustment for BMD, age and BMI. The association of circulating leptin levels with bAP, a specific marker of osteoblast activity suggests that leptin levels influence osteoblast activity in vivo in elderly women and men.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0047-6374(02)00195-1DOI Listing
March 2003