Publications by authors named "Janet E Olson"

204 Publications

N-Terminal Pro Brain Natriuretic Peptide, sST2, and Galectin-3 Levels in Breast Cancer Survivors.

J Clin Med 2021 Jul 27;10(15). Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55901, USA.

NT-proBNP, soluble ST2 (sST2), and galectin-3 are biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction that have been proposed as identifiers of patients experiencing asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction after anthracycline-based chemotherapy. This study aimed to compare the proportion of breast cancer (BC) survivors with elevated serum levels of these three putative biomarkers by prior receipt of anthracycline (yes vs. no). Five-hundred-eighty survivors of BC who had received anthracycline-based chemotherapy were matched by age and time between diagnosis and serum storage to 580 who had not. Cardiac biomarker levels were analyzed using immunoassays. Analyses were carried out using linear and logistic regression models. Anthracycline recipients had higher values of NT-proBNP than non-recipients (mean 116.0 ng/L vs. 97.0 ng/L, respectively; < 0.001). Values for ST2 and galectin-3 did not significantly differ by receipt of anthracycline. After further adjustment for age at breast cancer diagnosis, ethnicity, and receipt of trastuzumab, associations between receipt of anthracycline and higher NT-proBNP persisted ( < 0.001), showing that NT-proBNP may be a biomarker of cardiovascular toxicity after receipt of anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Further research to assess the clinical utility of NT-proBNP testing after receipt of anthracycline is recommended. sST2 and galectin-3 do not appear to differentiate between anthracycline recipients and non-recipients amongst breast cancer survivors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10153313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8346981PMC
July 2021

Risk of Late-Onset Breast Cancer in Genetically Predisposed Women.

J Clin Oncol 2021 Jul 22:JCO2100531. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Purpose: The prevalence of germline pathogenic variants (PVs) in established breast cancer predisposition genes in women in the general population over age 65 years is not well-defined. However, testing guidelines suggest that women diagnosed with breast cancer over age 65 years might have < 2.5% likelihood of a PV in a high-penetrance gene. This study aimed to establish the frequency of PVs and remaining risks of breast cancer for each gene in women over age 65 years.

Methods: A total of 26,707 women over age 65 years from population-based studies (51.5% with breast cancer and 48.5% unaffected) were tested for PVs in germline predisposition gene. Frequencies of PVs and associations between PVs in each gene and breast cancer were assessed, and remaining lifetime breast cancer risks were estimated for non-Hispanic White women with PVs.

Results: The frequency of PVs in predisposition genes was 3.18% for women with breast cancer and 1.48% for unaffected women over age 65 years. PVs in , , and were found in 3.42% of women diagnosed with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, 1.0% with ER-positive, and 3.01% with triple-negative breast cancer. Frequencies of PVs were lower among women with no first-degree relatives with breast cancer. PVs in , , , and were associated with increased risks (odds ratio = 2.9-4.0) of breast cancer. Remaining lifetime risks of breast cancer were ≥ 15% for those with PVs in , , and .

Conclusion: This study suggests that all women diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer or ER-negative breast cancer should receive genetic testing and that women over age 65 years with and PVs and perhaps with and PVs should be considered for magnetic resonance imaging screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.21.00531DOI Listing
July 2021

Polygenic risk score and risk of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in caucasians and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in African Americans.

Leukemia 2021 Jul 20. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a precursor to CLL. Other than age, sex, and CLL family-history, little is known about factors associated with MBL risk. A polygenic-risk-score (PRS) of 41 CLL-susceptibility variants has been found to be associated with CLL risk among individuals of European-ancestry(EA). Here, we evaluate these variants, the PRS, and environmental factors for MBL risk. We also evaluate these variants and the CLL-PRS among African-American (AA) and EA-CLL cases and controls. Our study included 560 EA MBLs, 869 CLLs (696 EA/173 AA), and 2866 controls (2631 EA/235 AA). We used logistic regression, adjusting for age and sex, to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals within each race. We found significant associations with MBL risk among 21 of 41 variants and with the CLL-PRS (OR = 1.86, P = 1.9 × 10, c-statistic = 0.72). Little evidence of any association between MBL risk and environmental factors was observed. We observed significant associations of the CLL-PRS with EA-CLL risk (OR = 2.53, P = 4.0 × 10, c-statistic = 0.77) and AA-CLL risk (OR = 1.76, P = 5.1 × 10, c-statistic = 0.62). Inherited genetic factors and not environmental are associated with MBL risk. In particular, the CLL-PRS is a strong predictor for both risk of MBL and EA-CLL, but less so for AA-CLL supporting the need for further work in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41375-021-01344-9DOI Listing
July 2021

Functional annotation of the 2q35 breast cancer risk locus implicates a structural variant in influencing activity of a long-range enhancer element.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 07 18;108(7):1190-1203. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany.

A combination of genetic and functional approaches has identified three independent breast cancer risk loci at 2q35. A recent fine-scale mapping analysis to refine these associations resulted in 1 (signal 1), 5 (signal 2), and 42 (signal 3) credible causal variants at these loci. We used publicly available in silico DNase I and ChIP-seq data with in vitro reporter gene and CRISPR assays to annotate signals 2 and 3. We identified putative regulatory elements that enhanced cell-type-specific transcription from the IGFBP5 promoter at both signals (30- to 40-fold increased expression by the putative regulatory element at signal 2, 2- to 3-fold by the putative regulatory element at signal 3). We further identified one of the five credible causal variants at signal 2, a 1.4 kb deletion (esv3594306), as the likely causal variant; the deletion allele of this variant was associated with an average additional increase in IGFBP5 expression of 1.3-fold (MCF-7) and 2.2-fold (T-47D). We propose a model in which the deletion allele of esv3594306 juxtaposes two transcription factor binding regions (annotated by estrogen receptor alpha ChIP-seq peaks) to generate a single extended regulatory element. This regulatory element increases cell-type-specific expression of the tumor suppressor gene IGFBP5 and, thereby, reduces risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% CI 0.74-0.81, p = 3.1 × 10).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.05.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8322933PMC
July 2021

Longitudinal cohorts for harnessing the electronic health record for disease prediction in a US population.

BMJ Open 2021 06 8;11(6):e044353. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Purpose: The depth and breadth of clinical data within electronic health record (EHR) systems paired with innovative machine learning methods can be leveraged to identify novel risk factors for complex diseases. However, analysing the EHR is challenging due to complexity and quality of the data. Therefore, we developed large electronic population-based cohorts with comprehensive harmonised and processed EHR data.

Participants: All individuals 30 years of age or older who resided in Olmsted County, Minnesota on 1 January 2006 were identified for the discovery cohort. Algorithms to define a variety of patient characteristics were developed and validated, thus building a comprehensive risk profile for each patient. Patients are followed for incident diseases and ageing-related outcomes. Using the same methods, an independent validation cohort was assembled by identifying all individuals 30 years of age or older who resided in the largely rural 26-county area of southern Minnesota and western Wisconsin on 1 January 2013.

Findings To Date: For the discovery cohort, 76 255 individuals (median age 49; 53% women) were identified from which a total of 9 644 221 laboratory results; 9 513 840 diagnosis codes; 10 924 291 procedure codes; 1 277 231 outpatient drug prescriptions; 966 136 heart rate measurements and 1 159 836 blood pressure (BP) measurements were retrieved during the baseline time period. The most prevalent conditions in this cohort were hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and arthritis. For the validation cohort, 333 460 individuals (median age 54; 52% women) were identified and to date, a total of 19 926 750 diagnosis codes, 10 527 444 heart rate measurements and 7 356 344 BP measurements were retrieved during baseline.

Future Plans: Using advanced machine learning approaches, these electronic cohorts will be used to identify novel sex-specific risk factors for complex diseases. These approaches will allow us to address several challenges with the use of EHR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-044353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8190051PMC
June 2021

Risk of Breast Cancer Among Carriers of Pathogenic Variants in Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes Varies by Polygenic Risk Score.

J Clin Oncol 2021 Aug 8;39(23):2564-2573. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Population Health Sciences Department, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY.

Purpose: This study assessed the joint association of pathogenic variants (PVs) in breast cancer (BC) predisposition genes and polygenic risk scores (PRS) with BC in the general population.

Methods: A total of 26,798 non-Hispanic white BC cases and 26,127 controls from predominately population-based studies in the Cancer Risk Estimates Related to Susceptibility consortium were evaluated for PVs in , , , , , , , , and . PRS based on 105 common variants were created using effect estimates from BC genome-wide association studies; the performance of an overall BC PRS and estrogen receptor-specific PRS were evaluated. The odds of BC based on the PVs and PRS were estimated using penalized logistic regression. The results were combined with age-specific incidence rates to estimate 5-year and lifetime absolute risks of BC across percentiles of PRS by PV status and first-degree family history of BC.

Results: The estimated lifetime risks of BC among general-population noncarriers, based on 10th and 90th percentiles of PRS, were 9.1%-23.9% and 6.7%-18.2% for women with or without first-degree relatives with BC, respectively. Taking PRS into account, more than 95% of , , and carriers had > 20% lifetime risks of BC, whereas, respectively, 52.5% and 69.7% of and carriers without first-degree relatives with BC, and 78.8% and 89.9% of those with a first-degree relative with BC had > 20% risk.

Conclusion: PRS facilitates personalization of BC risk among carriers of PVs in predisposition genes. Incorporating PRS into BC risk estimation may help identify > 30% of and nearly half of carriers below the 20% lifetime risk threshold, suggesting the addition of PRS may prevent overscreening and enable more personalized risk management approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.20.01992DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8330969PMC
August 2021

Gene-Environment Interactions Relevant to Estrogen and Risk of Breast Cancer: Can Gene-Environment Interactions Be Detected Only among Candidate SNPs from Genome-Wide Association Studies?

Cancers (Basel) 2021 May 14;13(10). Epub 2021 May 14.

Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2730 Herlev, Denmark.

In this study we aim to examine gene-environment interactions (GxEs) between genes involved with estrogen metabolism and environmental factors related to estrogen exposure. GxE analyses were conducted with 1970 Korean breast cancer cases and 2052 controls in the case-control study, the Seoul Breast Cancer Study (SEBCS). A total of 11,555 SNPs from the 137 candidate genes were included in the GxE analyses with eight established environmental factors. A replication test was conducted by using an independent population from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), with 62,485 Europeans and 9047 Asians. The GxE tests were performed by using two-step methods in GxEScan software. Two interactions were found in the SEBCS. The first interaction was shown between rs13035764 of NCOA1 and age at menarche in the GE|2df model (-2df = 1.2 × 10). The age at menarche before 14 years old was associated with the high risk of breast cancer, and the risk was higher when subjects had homozygous minor allele G. The second GxE was shown between rs851998 near ESR1 and height in the GE|2df model (-2df = 1.1 × 10). Height taller than 160 cm was associated with a high risk of breast cancer, and the risk increased when the minor allele was added. The findings were not replicated in the BCAC. These results would suggest specificity in Koreans for breast cancer risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13102370DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8156547PMC
May 2021

Pathway to Ascertain the Role of Pharmacogenomics in Healthcare Utilization Outcomes [Response to Letter].

Pharmgenomics Pers Med 2021 6;14:545-546. Epub 2021 May 6.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PGPM.S316851DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8111333PMC
May 2021

Genetic basis of hypercholesterolemia in adults.

NPJ Genom Med 2021 Apr 14;6(1):28. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

We investigated monogenic and polygenic causes of hypercholesterolemia in a population-based cohort, excluding secondary hypercholesterolemia, and using an established framework to identify pathogenic variants. We studied 1682 individuals (50.2 ± 8.6 years, 41.3% males) from southeast Minnesota with primary hypercholesterolemia (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥155 mg/dl in the absence of identifiable secondary causes). Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) phenotype was defined as a Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) score ≥6. Participants underwent sequencing of LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9, and genotyping of 12 LDL-C-associated single-nucleotide variants to construct a polygenic score (PGS) for LDL-C. The presence of a pathogenic/likely pathogenic variant was considered monogenic etiology and a PGS ≥90th percentile was considered polygenic etiology. The mean LDL-C level was 187.3 ± 32.3 mg/dl and phenotypic FH was present in 8.4% of the cohort. An identifiable genetic etiology was present in 17.1% individuals (monogenic in 1.5% and polygenic in 15.6%). Phenotypic and genetic FH showed poor overlap. Only 26% of those who met the clinical criteria of FH had an identifiable genetic etiology and of those with an identifiable genetic etiology only 12.9% met clinical criteria for FH. Genetic factors explained 7.4% of the variance in LDL-C. In conclusion, in adults with primary hypercholesterolemia, 17.1% had an identifiable genetic etiology and the overlap between phenotypic and genetic FH was modest.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41525-021-00190-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8046820PMC
April 2021

Genetic Predictors of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy from Paclitaxel, Carboplatin and Oxaliplatin: NCCTG/Alliance N08C1, N08CA and N08CB Study.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Mar 3;13(5). Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and potentially permanent adverse effect of chemotherapeutic agents including taxanes such as paclitaxel and platinum-based compounds such as oxaliplatin and carboplatin. Previous studies have suggested that genetics may impact the risk of CIPN. We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for CIPN in two independent populations who had completed European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-CIPN20 assessments (a CIPN-specific 20-item questionnaire which includes three scales that evaluate sensory, autonomic, and motor symptoms). The study population N08Cx included 692 participants from three clinical trials (North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) N08C1, N08CA, and N08CB) who had been treated with paclitaxel, paclitaxel plus carboplatin, or oxaliplatin. The primary endpoint for the GWAS was the change from pre-chemotherapy CIPN20 sensory score to the worse score over the following 18 weeks. Study population The Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry (MCBDR) consisted of 381 Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry enrollees who had been treated with taxane or platinum-based chemotherapy. The primary endpoint for the GWAS assessed was the earliest CIPN20 sensory score available after the completion of chemotherapy. In multivariate model analyses, chemotherapy regimen ( = 3.0 × 10) and genetic ancestry ( = 0.007) were significantly associated with CIPN in the N08Cx population. Only age ( = 0.0004) was significantly associated with CIPN in the MCBDR population. The SNP most associated with CIPN was rs56360211 near ( =7.92 × 10) in N08Cx and rs113807868 near in the MCBDR ( = 1.27 × 10). Due to a lack of replication, we cannot conclude that we identified any genetic predictors of CIPN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13051084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7959452PMC
March 2021

Impact of Pharmacogenomic Information on Values of Care and Quality of Life Associated with Codeine and Tramadol-Related Adverse Drug Events.

Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes 2021 Feb 13;5(1):35-45. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Objective: To assess the potential impact of Pharmacogenomic (PGx) variation in cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) enzyme function, using loss in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) associated with treatment problems, and the willingness to pay to avoid treatment problems from patients' and payers' perspectives.

Patients And Methods: The study included patients prescribed tramadol or codeine, or both, between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2017. Demographic information and adverse drug events, including adverse drug events and poor pain control, were collected from the electronic health records using natural language processing techniques and review by trained abstractors. Patients' willingness to pay and QALY estimates were based on comprehensive literature review. The CYP2D6 phenotypes were divided into 4 groups: ultra-rapid metabolizers, normal metabolizers, intermediate metabolizers, and poor metabolizers.

Results: Among the 2860 identified patients, 63 (2%) were ultrarapid metabolizers, 1449 (50%) were normal metabolizers, 1155 (40%) were intermediate metabolizers, and 193 (7%) were poor metabolizers. The patients' average estimated willingness-to-pay value to avoid treatment problems was $23 per month; poor metabolizers developed problems with the highest estimated willingness-to-pay value ($32 per month). The mean QALY loss among all patients was 0.024 QALYs (8.8 healthy days); poor metabolizers had the highest loss (0.027 QALYs, 9.9 healthy days).

Conclusion: Patients with various phenotypes developed different treatment problem profiles. Poor CYP2D6 metabolizers developed problems with highest willingness to pay, and they might potentially benefit most from PGx-guided treatment and problem prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocpiqo.2020.08.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7930862PMC
February 2021

No Association Between Pharmacogenomics Variants and Hospital and Emergency Department Utilization: A Mayo Clinic Biobank Retrospective Study.

Pharmgenomics Pers Med 2021 11;14:229-237. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Background: The use of pharmacogenomics data is increasing in clinical practice. However, it is unknown if pharmacogenomics data can be used more broadly to predict outcomes like hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visit. We aim to determine the association between selected pharmacogenomics phenotypes and hospital utilization outcomes (hospitalization and ED visits).

Methods: This cohort study utilized 10,078 patients from the Mayo Clinic Biobank in the RIGHT protocol with sequence and interpreted phenotypes for 10 selected pharmacogenes including , and . The primary outcome was hospitalization with ED visits as a secondary outcome. We used Cox proportional hazards model to test the association between each pharmacogenomics phenotype and the risk of the outcomes.

Results: During the follow-up period (median [in years] = 7.3), 13% (n=1354) and 8% (n=813) of the subjects experienced hospitalization and ED visits, respectively. Compared to subjects who did not experience hospitalization, hospitalized patients were older (median age [in years]: 67 vs 65), poorer self-rated health (15% vs 4.7% for fair/poor), and higher disease burden (median number of chronic conditions: 7 vs 4) at baseline. There was no association of hospitalization with any of the pharmacogenomics phenotypes. The pharmacogenomics phenotypes were not associated with disease burden, a well-established risk factor for hospital utilization outcomes. Similar findings were observed for patients with ED visits during the follow-up period.

Conclusion: We found no association of 10 well-established pharmacogenomics phenotypes with either hospitalization or ED visits in this relatively large biobank population and outside the context of specific drug use related to these genes. Traditional risk factors for hospitalization like age and self-rated health were much more likely to predict hospitalization and/or ED visits than this pharmacogenomics information.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PGPM.S281645DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7886254PMC
February 2021

A case-only study to identify genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Nat Commun 2021 02 17;12(1):1078. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.

Breast cancer (BC) risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers varies by genetic and familial factors. About 50 common variants have been shown to modify BC risk for mutation carriers. All but three, were identified in general population studies. Other mutation carrier-specific susceptibility variants may exist but studies of mutation carriers have so far been underpowered. We conduct a novel case-only genome-wide association study comparing genotype frequencies between 60,212 general population BC cases and 13,007 cases with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We identify robust novel associations for 2 variants with BC for BRCA1 and 3 for BRCA2 mutation carriers, P < 10, at 5 loci, which are not associated with risk in the general population. They include rs60882887 at 11p11.2 where MADD, SP11 and EIF1, genes previously implicated in BC biology, are predicted as potential targets. These findings will contribute towards customising BC polygenic risk scores for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20496-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7890067PMC
February 2021

Genetic Variations and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL): A Genome-Wide Study Approach.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Feb 10;13(4). Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important prognostic patient-reported outcome in oncology. Because prior studies suggest that HRQOL is, in part, heritable, we performed a GWAS to elucidate genetic factors associated with HRQOL in breast cancer survivors. Physical and mental HRQOL were measured via paper surveys that included the PROMIS-10 physical and mental health domain scales in 1442 breast cancer survivors participating in the Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry (MCBDR). In multivariable regression analyses, age and financial concerns were significantly associated with global physical health (age: = 1.6 × 10; financial concerns: = 4.8 × 10) and mental health (age: = 3.5 × 10; financial concerns: = 2.0 × 10. Chemotherapy was associated with worse global mental health ( = 0.01). In the GWAS, none of the SNPs reached the genome-wide association significance threshold of 5 × 10 for associations with either global physical or global mental health, however, a cluster of SNPs in , particularly rs112718371, appeared to be linked to worse global physical health ( = 5.21 × 10). Additionally, SNPs in and were also moderately associated with worse physical and mental health ( < 10). These biologically plausible candidate SNPs warrant further study as possible predictors of HRQOL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13040716DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7916362PMC
February 2021

CYP3A7*1C allele: linking premenopausal oestrone and progesterone levels with risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers.

Br J Cancer 2021 02 26;124(4):842-854. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Molecular Epidemiology Group, C080, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence for a role of endogenous sex hormones in the aetiology of breast cancer. The aim of this analysis was to identify genetic variants that are associated with urinary sex-hormone levels and breast cancer risk.

Methods: We carried out a genome-wide association study of urinary oestrone-3-glucuronide and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide levels in 560 premenopausal women, with additional analysis of progesterone levels in 298 premenopausal women. To test for the association with breast cancer risk, we carried out follow-up genotyping in 90,916 cases and 89,893 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. All women were of European ancestry.

Results: For pregnanediol-3-glucuronide, there were no genome-wide significant associations; for oestrone-3-glucuronide, we identified a single peak mapping to the CYP3A locus, annotated by rs45446698. The minor rs45446698-C allele was associated with lower oestrone-3-glucuronide (-49.2%, 95% CI -56.1% to -41.1%, P = 3.1 × 10); in follow-up analyses, rs45446698-C was also associated with lower progesterone (-26.7%, 95% CI -39.4% to -11.6%, P = 0.001) and reduced risk of oestrogen and progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer (OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.82-0.91, P = 6.9 × 10).

Conclusions: The CYP3A7*1C allele is associated with reduced risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer possibly mediated via an effect on the metabolism of endogenous sex hormones in premenopausal women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-020-01185-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884683PMC
February 2021

Real-World Experiences With Yoga on Cancer-Related Symptoms in Women With Breast Cancer.

Glob Adv Health Med 2021 8;10:2164956120984140. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Department of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Purpose: Integrative therapies such as yoga are potential treatments for many psychological and physical symptoms that occur during and/or after treatment for cancer. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the patient-perceived benefit of yoga for symptoms commonly experienced by breast cancer survivors.

Methods: 1,049 breast cancer survivors who had self-reported use of yoga on a follow up survey, in an ongoing prospective Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry (MCBDR), received an additional mailed yoga-focused survey asking about the impact of yoga on a variety of symptoms. Differences between pre- and post- scores were assessed using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test.

Results: 802/1,049 (76%) of women who were approached to participate, consented and returned the survey. 507/802 (63%) reported use of yoga during and/or after their cancer diagnosis. The vast majority of respondents (89.4%) reported some symptomatic benefit from yoga. The most common symptoms that prompted the use of yoga were breast/chest wall pain, lymphedema, and anxiety. Only 9% of patients reported that they had been referred to yoga by a medical professional. While the greatest symptom improvement was reported with breast/chest wall pain and anxiety, significant improvement was also perceived in joint pain, muscle pain, fatigue, headache, quality of life, hot flashes, nausea/vomiting, depression, insomnia, lymphedema, and peripheral neuropathy, (all p-values <0.004).

Conclusion: Data supporting the use of yoga for symptom management after cancer are limited and typically focus on mental health. In this study, users of yoga often reported physical benefits as well as mental health benefits. Further prospective studies investigating the efficacy of yoga in survivorship are warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2164956120984140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7797571PMC
January 2021

A Population-Based Study of Genes Previously Implicated in Breast Cancer.

N Engl J Med 2021 02 20;384(5):440-451. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

From Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (C. Hu, S.N.H., R.G., K.Y.L., J.N., J.L., S. Yadav, N.J.B., T.L., J.E.O., C.S., C.M.V., E.C.P., F.J.C.); Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health (H.H., C.G., D.J.H., P.K.), Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University (K.A.B., J.R.P., L.R.), and Brigham and Women's Hospital (H.E.) - all in Boston; Qiagen, Hilden, Germany (R.S., J.K.); Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo (C.B.A., S. Yao), and Weill Cornell Medicine, New York (R.T.) - both in New York; the University of California, Irvine (H.A.-C., A.Z.), Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte (L.B., H.M., S.N., J.N.W.), Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (C. Haiman), and Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (E.M.J., A.W.K.) - all in California; the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, Milwaukee (P.A.), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison (E.S.B., I.M.O., A.T.-D.); the Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick (E.V.B.); the Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta (B.D.C., S.M.G., M.G., J.M.H., E.J.J., A.V.P.); the University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom (D.J.H.); the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (C.K., P.A.N.) and the Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington (S.L.) - both in Seattle; the Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu (L.L.M.); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC (K.M.O., D.P.S., J.A.T., C.W.); Vanderbilt University, Nashville (T.P., S.R.); the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (D.E.G.); and the Department of Medicine and the Basser Center for BRCA, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (S.M.D., K.L.N.).

Background: Population-based estimates of the risk of breast cancer associated with germline pathogenic variants in cancer-predisposition genes are critically needed for risk assessment and management in women with inherited pathogenic variants.

Methods: In a population-based case-control study, we performed sequencing using a custom multigene amplicon-based panel to identify germline pathogenic variants in 28 cancer-predisposition genes among 32,247 women with breast cancer (case patients) and 32,544 unaffected women (controls) from population-based studies in the Cancer Risk Estimates Related to Susceptibility (CARRIERS) consortium. Associations between pathogenic variants in each gene and the risk of breast cancer were assessed.

Results: Pathogenic variants in 12 established breast cancer-predisposition genes were detected in 5.03% of case patients and in 1.63% of controls. Pathogenic variants in and were associated with a high risk of breast cancer, with odds ratios of 7.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.33 to 11.27) and 5.23 (95% CI, 4.09 to 6.77), respectively. Pathogenic variants in were associated with a moderate risk (odds ratio, 3.83; 95% CI, 2.68 to 5.63). Pathogenic variants in , , and were associated with increased risks of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer and triple-negative breast cancer, whereas pathogenic variants in , , and were associated with an increased risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Pathogenic variants in 16 candidate breast cancer-predisposition genes, including the c.657_661del5 founder pathogenic variant in , were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

Conclusions: This study provides estimates of the prevalence and risk of breast cancer associated with pathogenic variants in known breast cancer-predisposition genes in the U.S. population. These estimates can inform cancer testing and screening and improve clinical management strategies for women in the general population with inherited pathogenic variants in these genes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2005936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8127622PMC
February 2021

Ascertainment of delirium status using natural language processing from electronic health records.

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2020 Oct 30. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Background: Delirium is underdiagnosed in clinical practice, and is not routinely coded for billing. Manual chart review can be used to identify the occurrence of delirium, however, it is labor-intensive and impractical for large-scale studies. Natural language processing (NLP) has the capability to process raw text in electronic health records (EHRs) and determine the meaning of the information. We developed and validated NLP algorithms to automatically identify the occurrence of delirium from EHRs.

Methods: This study used a randomly selected cohort from the population-based Mayo Clinic Biobank (n=300, age>=65). We adopted the standardized evidence-based framework confusion assessment method (CAM) to develop and evaluate NLP algorithms to identify the occurrence of delirium using clinical notes in EHRs. Two NLP algorithms were developed based on CAM criteria; one based on the original CAM (NLP-CAM; delirium vs. no delirium) and another based on our modified CAM (NLP-mCAM; definite, possible, and no delirium). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were used for concordance in delirium status between NLP algorithms and manual chart review as the gold standard. The prevalence of delirium cases was examined using ICD-9, NLP-CAM, and NLP-mCAM.

Results: NLP-CAM demonstrated a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.919, 1.000 and 0.967, respectively. NLP-mCAM demonstrated sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.827, 0.913 and 0.827, respectively. The prevalence analysis of delirium showed that the NLP-CAM algorithm identified 12,651 (9.4%) delirium patients, the NLP-mCAM algorithm identified 20,611 (15.3%) definite delirium cases and 10,762 (8.0%) possible cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa275DOI Listing
October 2020

Breast Cancer Polygenic Risk Score and Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 11 5;107(5):837-848. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry, Hong Kong; Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Department of Pathology, Happy Valley, Hong Kong.

Previous research has shown that polygenic risk scores (PRSs) can be used to stratify women according to their risk of developing primary invasive breast cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the association between a recently validated PRS of 313 germline variants (PRS) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk. We included 56,068 women of European ancestry diagnosed with first invasive breast cancer from 1990 onward with follow-up from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Metachronous CBC risk (N = 1,027) according to the distribution of PRS was quantified using Cox regression analyses. We assessed PRS interaction with age at first diagnosis, family history, morphology, ER status, PR status, and HER2 status, and (neo)adjuvant therapy. In studies of Asian women, with limited follow-up, CBC risk associated with PRS was assessed using logistic regression for 340 women with CBC compared with 12,133 women with unilateral breast cancer. Higher PRS was associated with increased CBC risk: hazard ratio per standard deviation (SD) = 1.25 (95%CI = 1.18-1.33) for Europeans, and an OR per SD = 1.15 (95%CI = 1.02-1.29) for Asians. The absolute lifetime risks of CBC, accounting for death as competing risk, were 12.4% for European women at the 10 percentile and 20.5% at the 90 percentile of PRS. We found no evidence of confounding by or interaction with individual characteristics, characteristics of the primary tumor, or treatment. The C-index for the PRS alone was 0.563 (95%CI = 0.547-0.586). In conclusion, PRS is an independent factor associated with CBC risk and can be incorporated into CBC risk prediction models to help improve stratification and optimize surveillance and treatment strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7675034PMC
November 2020

Association of Genetic Variants at With Chemotherapy-Related Heart Failure.

Front Cardiovasc Med 2020 13;7:142. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, United States.

Our previous GWAS identified genetic variants at six novel loci that were associated with a decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), < 1 × 10 in 1,191 early breast cancer patients from the N9831 clinical trial of chemotherapy plus trastuzumab. In this study we sought replication of these loci. We tested the top loci from the GWAS for association with chemotherapy-related heart failure (CRHF) using 26 CRHF cases from N9831 and 984 patients from the Mayo Clinic Biobank which included CRHF cases ( = 12) and control groups of patients treated with anthracycline +/- trastuzumab without HF ( = 282) and patients with HF that were never treated with anthracycline or trastuzumab ( = 690). We further examined associated loci in the context of gene expression and rare coding variants using a TWAS approach in heart left ventricle and Sanger sequencing, respectively. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and cardiomyopathy was modeled in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells and a mouse model, respectively, that were pre-treated with GsMTx-4, an inhibitor of TRPC6. ' flanking variant rs57242572-T was significantly more frequent in cases compared to controls, = 0.031, and rs61918162-T showed a trend for association, = 0.065. The rs61918162 T-allele was associated with higher expression in the heart left ventricle. We identified a single rare missense variant (rs767086724, N338S, prevalence 0.0025% in GnomAD) in one of 38 patients (2.6%) with CRHF. Pre-treatment of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells with GsMTx4 significantly reduced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Similarly, mice treated with GsMTx4 had significantly improved doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction. Genetic variants that are associated with increased expression in the heart and rare missense variants may be clinically useful as risk factors for CRHF. GsMTx-4 may be a cardioprotective agent in patients with risk variants. Replication of the genetic associations in larger well-characterized samples and functional studies are required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2020.00142DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7438395PMC
August 2020

Mini-Review of Laboratory Operations in Biobanking: Building Biobanking Resources for Translational Research.

Front Public Health 2020 28;8:362. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.

Biobanks have become integral to improving population health. We are in a new era in medicine as patients, health professionals, and researchers increasingly collaborate to gain new knowledge and explore new paradigms for diagnosing and treating disease. Many large-scale biobanking efforts are underway worldwide at the institutional, national, and even international level. When linked with subject data from questionnaires and medical records, biobanks serve as valuable resources in translational research. A biobank must have high quality samples that meet researcher's needs. Biobank laboratory operations require an enormous amount of support-from lab and storage space, information technology expertise, and a laboratory management information system to logistics for sample movement, quality management systems, and appropriate facilities. A paramount metric of success for a biobank is the concept of every biospecimen coming to the repository belongs to a participant who has something to contribute to research for a healthier future. This article will discuss the importance of biorepository operations, specific to the collection and storage of participants materials. Specific focus will be given to maintaining the quality of samples, along with the various levels of support biorepositories need to fulfill their purpose and ensure the integrity of each specimen is maintained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2020.00362DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7399165PMC
May 2021

Impact of Diverse Data Sources on Computational Phenotyping.

Front Genet 2020 3;11:556. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Division of Digital Health Sciences, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States.

Electronic health records (EHRs) are widely adopted with a great potential to serve as a rich, integrated source of phenotype information. Computational phenotyping, which extracts phenotypes from EHR data automatically, can accelerate the adoption and utilization of phenotype-driven efforts to advance scientific discovery and improve healthcare delivery. A list of computational phenotyping algorithms has been published but data fragmentation, i.e., incomplete data within one single data source, has been raised as an inherent limitation of computational phenotyping. In this study, we investigated the impact of diverse data sources on two published computational phenotyping algorithms, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using Mayo EHRs and Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) which links medical records from multiple health care systems. Results showed that both RA (less prevalent) and T2DM (more prevalent) case selections were markedly impacted by data fragmentation, with positive predictive value (PPV) of 91.4 and 92.4%, false-negative rate (FNR) of 26.6 and 14% in Mayo data, respectively, PPV of 97.2 and 98.3%, FNR of 5.2 and 3.3% in REP. T2DM controls also contain biases, with PPV of 91.2% and FNR of 1.2% for Mayo. We further elaborated underlying reasons impacting the performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2020.00556DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7283539PMC
June 2020

Germline HOXB13 mutations p.G84E and p.R217C do not confer an increased breast cancer risk.

Sci Rep 2020 06 16;10(1):9688. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

In breast cancer, high levels of homeobox protein Hox-B13 (HOXB13) have been associated with disease progression of ER-positive breast cancer patients and resistance to tamoxifen treatment. Since HOXB13 p.G84E is a prostate cancer risk allele, we evaluated the association between HOXB13 germline mutations and breast cancer risk in a previous study consisting of 3,270 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 2,327 controls from the Netherlands. Although both recurrent HOXB13 mutations p.G84E and p.R217C were not associated with breast cancer risk, the risk estimation for p.R217C was not very precise. To provide more conclusive evidence regarding the role of HOXB13 in breast cancer susceptibility, we here evaluated the association between HOXB13 mutations and increased breast cancer risk within 81 studies of the international Breast Cancer Association Consortium containing 68,521 invasive breast cancer patients and 54,865 controls. Both HOXB13 p.G84E and p.R217C did not associate with the development of breast cancer in European women, neither in the overall analysis (OR = 1.035, 95% CI = 0.859-1.246, P = 0.718 and OR = 0.798, 95% CI = 0.482-1.322, P = 0.381 respectively), nor in specific high-risk subgroups or breast cancer subtypes. Thus, although involved in breast cancer progression, HOXB13 is not a material breast cancer susceptibility gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-65665-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7297796PMC
June 2020

Inferring multimodal latent topics from electronic health records.

Nat Commun 2020 05 21;11(1):2536. Epub 2020 May 21.

Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA.

Electronic health records (EHR) are rich heterogeneous collections of patient health information, whose broad adoption provides clinicians and researchers unprecedented opportunities for health informatics, disease-risk prediction, actionable clinical recommendations, and precision medicine. However, EHRs present several modeling challenges, including highly sparse data matrices, noisy irregular clinical notes, arbitrary biases in billing code assignment, diagnosis-driven lab tests, and heterogeneous data types. To address these challenges, we present MixEHR, a multi-view Bayesian topic model. We demonstrate MixEHR on MIMIC-III, Mayo Clinic Bipolar Disorder, and Quebec Congenital Heart Disease EHR datasets. Qualitatively, MixEHR disease topics reveal meaningful combinations of clinical features across heterogeneous data types. Quantitatively, we observe superior prediction accuracy of diagnostic codes and lab test imputations compared to the state-of-art methods. We leverage the inferred patient topic mixtures to classify target diseases and predict mortality of patients in critical conditions. In all comparison, MixEHR confers competitive performance and reveals meaningful disease-related topics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16378-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7242436PMC
May 2020

Combined Associations of a Polygenic Risk Score and Classical Risk Factors With Breast Cancer Risk.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2021 03;113(3):329-337

Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

We evaluated the joint associations between a new 313-variant PRS (PRS313) and questionnaire-based breast cancer risk factors for women of European ancestry, using 72 284 cases and 80 354 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Interactions were evaluated using standard logistic regression and a newly developed case-only method for breast cancer risk overall and by estrogen receptor status. After accounting for multiple testing, we did not find evidence that per-standard deviation PRS313 odds ratio differed across strata defined by individual risk factors. Goodness-of-fit tests did not reject the assumption of a multiplicative model between PRS313 and each risk factor. Variation in projected absolute lifetime risk of breast cancer associated with classical risk factors was greater for women with higher genetic risk (PRS313 and family history) and, on average, 17.5% higher in the highest vs lowest deciles of genetic risk. These findings have implications for risk prevention for women at increased risk of breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djaa056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7936056PMC
March 2021

Assessing the stability of biobank donor preferences regarding sample use: evidence supporting the value of dynamic consent.

Eur J Hum Genet 2020 09 23;28(9):1168-1177. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Biomedical Ethics Research Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Dynamic consent has been proposed as a strategy for addressing the limitations of traditional, broad consent for biobank participation. Although the argument for dynamic consent has been made on theoretical grounds, empirical studies evaluating the potential utility of dynamic consent are needed to enhance deliberations about the merits of dynamic consent. Few studies have assessed such considerations as whether donor preferences may change over time or if participants would use a dynamic consent mechanism to modify preferences when they change. We administered a 66-item survey to participants in a large DNA biobank. The survey sought to gauge the stability of donor preferences specified at the time of biobank enrollment, specifically the stability of donors' preference regarding posthumous availability of biospecimens to next-of-kin. We received 1164 completed surveys for a response rate of 72%. Forty percent of respondents indicated a preference regarding sample availability on the survey (T2) that was inconsistent with the preference they had expressed when they enrolled in the biobank (T1). Most (94%) individuals with inconsistent preferences regarding sample availability had initially restricted sample availability at T1 but were comfortable with broader availability when asked at the time of the survey (T2). Our findings demonstrate that preferences regarding sample use expressed at the time of enrollment in a DNA biobank may not be reliable indicators of donor preferences over time. These findings lend empirical support to the case for a dynamic consent model in which biobank participants are approached over time to clarify their views regarding sample use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-020-0625-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7608348PMC
September 2020

An assessment of patient perspectives on pharmacogenomics educational materials.

Pharmacogenomics 2020 04 15;21(5):347-358. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Pharmacogenomics (PGx) holds potential to improve patient treatment; yet, effective patient educational materials are limited. Using a 'think aloud' technique, we sought to understand comprehension and perceptions of a multimedia PGx results packet including a cover letter with QR code to an educational video, brochure and prototype report in the context of PGx case vignettes. The cover letter and video components were viewed less favorably due to excess detail, complex jargon and technology challenges. Recommendations were to enhance comprehension and utility and to customize materials to each patient's medications or disease conditions. Educational materials were revised to improve comprehension and usability, and diminish concerns to better prepare patients to understand the importance of discussing test results with their provider.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/pgs-2019-0175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7197106PMC
April 2020

Real-world experiences with acupuncture among breast cancer survivors: a cross-sectional survey study.

Support Care Cancer 2020 Dec 6;28(12):5833-5838. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate acupuncture use among breast cancer survivors, including perceived symptom improvements and referral patterns.

Methods: Breast cancer survivors who had used acupuncture for cancer- or treatment-related symptoms were identified using an ongoing prospective Mayo Clinic Breast Disease Registry (MCBDR). Additionally, Mayo Clinic electronic health records (MCEHR) were queried to identify eligible participants. All received a mailed consent form and survey including acupuncture-related questions about acupuncture referrals, delivery, and costs. Respondents were also asked to recall symptom severity before and after acupuncture treatment and time to benefit on Likert scales.

Results: Acupuncture use was reported among 415 participants (12.3%) of the MCBDR. Among MCBDR and MCEHR eligible participants, 241 women returned surveys. A total of 193 (82.1%) participants reported a symptomatic benefit from acupuncture, and 57 (24.1% of participants) reported a "substantial benefit" or "totally resolved my symptoms" (corresponding to 4 and 5 on the 5-point Likert scale). The mean symptom severity decreased by at least 1 point of the 5-point scale for each symptom; the percentage of patients who reported an improvement in symptoms ranged from 56% (lymphedema) to 79% (headache). The majority of patients reported time to benefit as "immediate" (34%) or "after a few treatments" (40.4%). Over half of the participants self-referred for treatment; 24.1% were referred by their oncologist. Acupuncture delivery was more frequent in private offices (61.0%) than in hospital or medical settings (42.3%). Twelve participants (5.1%) reported negative side effects, such as discomfort.

Conclusions: Acupuncture is commonly utilized by patients for a variety of breast cancer-related symptoms. However, patients frequently self-refer for acupuncture treatments, and most acupuncture care is completed at private offices, rather than medical clinic or hospital settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-020-05442-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7541443PMC
December 2020
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