Dr Jane Desborough, RN, RM, MPH, PhD - Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health,, Australian National University - Senior Research Fellow

Dr Jane Desborough

RN, RM, MPH, PhD

Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health,, Australian National University

Senior Research Fellow

Canberra, ACT | Australia

Main Specialties: Family Practice, Nursing, Preventive Medicine

Additional Specialties: Patient and Public Involvement, Patient Enablement, Patient Satisfaction, Health Care Quality, Primary Care, Chronic Disease Management,

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1406-4593

Dr Jane Desborough, RN, RM, MPH, PhD - Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health,, Australian National University - Senior Research Fellow

Dr Jane Desborough

RN, RM, MPH, PhD

Introduction

Jane Desborough (DAppScNursing; GDipMid; MPH, PhD) is a Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University. Jane is a mixed methods researcher, who works closely with patients, clinicians and policy makers to conduct research that is not only responsive to their needs and preferences, but aims to target quality and outcomes improvement.

Jane leads the Health Experience Team for the ANU’s inaugural grand challenge project Our Health In Our Hands (OHIOH). This team is comprised of more than 20 researchers, more than half of whom are living with Multiple Sclerosis or Type 1 Diabetes. Its aim is to embed the experiences and perspectives of people living with MS and T1DM into the project from inception to implementation.

Jane is a registered nurse and midwife, and has worked clinically in a variety of settings for 25 years, including remote area nursing. Before moving to academia, Jane worked as a Senior Policy Officer at the ACT Health Directorate in the Office of the ACT Chief Nurse..

Primary Affiliation: Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health,, Australian National University - Canberra, ACT , Australia

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2012 - Jan 2015
Australian National University
PhD (Population Health)
Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute
Jan 2008 - Jan 2010
University of Sydney
Masters of Public Health
School of Public Health
Jan 1992 - Jan 1993
University of Technology Sydney
Graduate Diploma in Midwifery
Nursing and Midwifery
Jan 1988 - Jan 1990
University of Canberra Discipline of Nursing
Diploma Applied Science, Nursing
Nursing

Experience

Feb 2016
Australian National University
Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health

Publications

20Publications

102Reads

6Profile Views

12PubMed Central Citations

Nonverbal communication between registered nurses and patients during chronic disease management consultations: Observations from general practice.

J Clin Nurs 2020 Jul 13;29(13-14):2378-2387. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

School of Nursing, University of Wollongong, WOLLONGONG, NSW, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15249DOI Listing
July 2020
1.233 Impact Factor

'It struck at the heart of who I thought I was': A meta-synthesis of the qualitative literature examining the experiences of people with multiple sclerosis.

Health Expect 2020 Jun 24. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Australian National University Medical School, College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hex.13093DOI Listing
June 2020
3.410 Impact Factor

The importance of consistent advice during a pandemic: An analysis of Australian advice regarding personal protective equipment in healthcare settings during COVID-19.

Aust J Gen Pract 2020 06;49(6):369-372

AM, FRACGP, FAHMS, Principal Medical Advisor @ Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, ACT; Professor of Primary Care Reform, Australian National University, ACT; Adjunct Professor, Department of Family @ Community Medicine, University of Toronto, TO; Emeritus Director, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Family Medicine and Primary Care, ON; Professorial Fellow, Murdoch Children@s Research Institute, The Royal Children@s Hospital, Vic; Honorary Professor of Global Primary Care, Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity, Flinders University, SA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.31128/AJGP-04-20-5374DOI Listing
June 2020

Lifestyle risk factor communication by nurses in general practice: Understanding the interactional elements.

J Adv Nurs 2020 Jan 14;76(1):234-242. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Research School of Population Health, College of Medicine, Biology and the Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.14221DOI Listing
January 2020
1.685 Impact Factor

Barriers to pharmacist prescribing: a scoping review comparing the UK, New Zealand, Canadian and Australian experiences.

Int J Pharm Pract 2019 Dec 9;27(6):479-489. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

Independent Consultant/Accredited Australian Pharmacist Working in General Practice, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijpp.12557DOI Listing
December 2019

Strategies for using non-participatory video research methods in general practice.

Nurse Res 2019 Jun;27(2):32-37

University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nr.2019.e1667DOI Listing
June 2019

Variation in and factors associated with psychosocial interventions for hospitalised self-harm patients in New South Wales, Australia.

Gen Hosp Psychiatry 2018 Sep - Oct;54:1-4. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2018.06.003DOI Listing
March 2019
47 Reads
2.610 Impact Factor

Developing a positive patient experience with nurses in general practice: An integrated model of patient satisfaction and enablement.

J Adv Nurs 2018 Mar 25;74(3):564-578. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

National Institute for Mental Health Research, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.13461DOI Listing
March 2018
9 Reads
1.685 Impact Factor

The process of patient enablement in general practice nurse consultations: a grounded theory study.

J Adv Nurs 2017 May 30;73(5):1085-1096. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

School of Health & Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.13199DOI Listing
May 2017
1 Read
1.685 Impact Factor

Usability of patient experience surveys in Australian primary health care: a scoping review.

Aust J Prim Health 2016 ;22(2):93-99

Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute, 63 Eggleston Road, The Australian National University, Acton, ACT 2601, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY14179DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read
1 Citation
1.220 Impact Factor

The impact of general practice nursing care on patient satisfaction and enablement in Australia: A mixed methods study.

Int J Nurs Stud 2016 Dec 17;64:108-119. Epub 2016 Oct 17.

National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2016.10.004DOI Listing
December 2016
5 Reads
2.250 Impact Factor

Impact of nursing care in Australian generalpractice on the quality of care: A pilot ofthe Patient Enablement and SatisfactionSurvey (PESS)

Desborough, J., et al. Impact of nursing care in Australian general practice on the quality of care:

Collegian

Background: Nursing roles in general practice have undergone significant expansion, but as yet there are few tools to measure the quality of nursing care in general practice. This study piloted the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey (PESS) to evaluate two aspects of quality of care in this setting.Methods: Participants were patients attending nurse-led general and chronic-disease clinics in two general practices The survey was posted to 180 consecutive patients attending these clinics over one week (response rate, 28% for general clinic, 40% chronic diseases clinic; n = 57). Scores were calculated for enablement and satisfaction and free text comments were analysed.Comparisons were made between patients who had attended the general clinic for influenza vaccination and for other conditions, and those who attended the chronic diseases clinic. Findings: Overall results indicate high levels of satisfaction (M = 68.3/75 SD = 8.1) and moder-ate enablement (M = 4.7/8 SD = 3.2). Significant differences were observed between satisfactionscores for patients attending the chronic disease clinic and the general clinic for influenzavaccinations alone, and between those attending the general clinic for influenza vaccinationsversus treatment of other conditions. Patients attending the chronic disease clinic had higherenablement scores than patients receiving influenza vaccinations at the general clinic. Analysisof free-text comments in the survey supported these findings.Conclusion: All patients reported satisfaction with nursing care. Patients receiving chronic dis-ease management reported high levels of enablement. This pilot indicated that the PESS candistinguish between two aspects of the quality of nursing care that may impact on patient outcomes.

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October 2014
4 Reads

A tool to evaluate patients' experiences of nursing care in Australian general practice: development of the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey.

Aust J Prim Health 2014 ;20(2):209-15

Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute, Australian National University, Level 1 Ian Potter House, Gordon Street, Acton, ACT 0200, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY12121DOI Listing
July 2014
4 Reads
1 Citation
1.220 Impact Factor

Nurse satisfaction with working in a nurse led primary care walk-in centre: an Australian experience.

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING Volume 31 Number 1, pp11-19

Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing

Objective The aim of this study was to gain insight into the nursing staff’s experiences and satisfaction with working at the ACT nurse led Walk-in Centre. Design and Setting Interviews with nursing staff working at the ACT Walk-in Centre were informed by a phenomenological approach. Questions were developed within inter, extra and intra-personal variables of satisfaction, underpinned by the principles of role theory. Subjects Twelve nurses were interviewed; three nurse practitioners and nine advanced practice nurses. Their ages ranged from 31 to 63 years and they had a minimum of 15 years of nursing experience. Interviews ranged from 30 minutes to two hours duration. Results Walk-in Centre nurses’ satisfaction with a number of inter and extra-personal factors was associated with their previous education and experience (intra-personal factors). Role stressors included adapting to autonomy, role incongruity and lack of access to appropriate education, training and sources of collaboration and mentorship. Sources of satisfaction were the autonomous role, relationships with the team and the capacity to deliver quality nursing care. Conclusion Whilst autonomy is valued by nurses, this does not translate to isolation or independence. Autonomy is only a source of satisfaction when coupled with supportive and cohesive professional relationships with both nursing and medical colleagues. Organisations implementing advanced nursing roles must have a comprehensive understanding of the requirements of nursing autonomy to ensure effective role implementation and associated job satisfaction. These findings add impetus to the need for the development of nursing education programs tailored specifically to primary health care.

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September 2013
4 Reads

Development and implementation of a nurse-led walk-in centre: evidence lost in translation?

J Health Serv Res Policy 2013 Jul;18(3):174-8

Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute, Australian National University, Acton, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1355819613488574DOI Listing
July 2013
2 Reads
1 Citation

Stakeholder perceptions of a nurse led walk-in centre.

BMC Health Serv Res 2012 Nov 5;12:382. Epub 2012 Nov 5.

Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute, Australian National University, Level 1 Ian Potter House, Cnr Marcus Clarke and Gordon Sts, Acton, ACT, 0200, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-12-382DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3529673PMC
November 2012
17 Reads
3 Citations
1.660 Impact Factor

Nurse-led primary healthcare walk-in centres: an integrative literature review.

J Adv Nurs 2012 Feb 11;68(2):248-63. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

Nursing and Midwifery Office, ACT Health, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05798.xDOI Listing
February 2012
1 Read
4 Citations
1.685 Impact Factor

How nurse practitioners implement their roles.

Aust Health Rev 2012 Feb;36(1):22-6

ACT Health, Canberra City, ACT 2601, Australia.

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http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=AH11030
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH11030DOI Listing
February 2012
1 Read
2 Citations
1.000 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Michelle Banfield
Michelle Banfield

Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute

6
Christine Phillips
Christine Phillips

Australian National University

5
Jane Mills
Jane Mills

School of Nursing

4
Nasser Bagheri
Nasser Bagheri

University of Otago

3
Rhian Parker
Rhian Parker

Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute

3
Anne Parkinson
Anne Parkinson

The Ohio State University

3
Sharon James
Sharon James

School of Nursing

3
Susan McInnes
Susan McInnes

University of Western Sydney

3
Michael Kidd
Michael Kidd

Flinders University

2
Elizabeth Halcomb
Elizabeth Halcomb

School of Nursing

2