Publications by authors named "Jan Oltmer"

3 Publications

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Detection of Cerebral Microbleeds With Venous Connection at 7 Tesla MRI.

Neurology 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Neurology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany.

Objective: Cerebral microbleeds (MBs) are a common finding in cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and Alzheimer's disease patients as well as in healthy elderly people, but their pathophysiology remains unclear. To investigate a possible role of veins in the development of MBs, we performed an exploratory study, assessing in vivo presence of MBs with a direct connection to a vein.

Methods: 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI was conducted and MBs were counted on Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). A submillimeter resolution QSM-based venogram allowed identification of MBs with a direct spatial connection to a vein.

Results: 51 subjects (mean age [SD] 70.5[8.6] years, 37% females) participated in the study: 20 were patients with CSVD (cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) with strictly lobar MBs (n=8), hypertensive arteriopathy (HA) with strictly deep MBs (n=5), and mixed lobar and deep MBs (n=7), 72.4 [6.1] years, 30% females) and 31 were healthy controls (69.4 [9.9] years, 42% females). In our cohort, we counted a total of 96 MBs with a venous connection, representing 14% of all detected MBs on 7T QSM. Most venous MBs (86%, n = 83) were observed in lobar locations and all of these were cortical. CAA subjects showed the highest ratio of venous to total MBs (19%) (HA=9%, mixed=18%, controls=5%) CONCLUSIONS: Our findings establish a link between cerebral MBs and the venous vasculature, pointing towards a possible contribution of veins to CSVD in general and to CAA in particular. Pathological studies are needed to confirm our observations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000011790DOI Listing
March 2021

Hippocampal vascular reserve associated with cognitive performance and hippocampal volume.

Brain 2020 02;143(2):622-634

Institute of Cognitive Neurology and Dementia Research, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany.

Medial temporal lobe dependent cognitive functions are highly vulnerable to hypoxia in the hippocampal region, yet little is known about the relationship between the richness of hippocampal vascular supply and cognition. Hippocampal vascularization patterns have been categorized into a mixed supply from both the posterior cerebral artery and the anterior choroidal artery or a single supply by the posterior cerebral artery only. Hippocampal arteries are small and affected by pathological changes when cerebral small vessel disease is present. We hypothesized, that hippocampal vascularization patterns may be important trait markers for vascular reserve and modulate (i) cognitive performance; (ii) structural hippocampal integrity; and (iii) the effect of cerebral small vessel disease on cognition. Using high-resolution 7 T time-of-flight angiography we manually classified hippocampal vascularization patterns in older adults with and without cerebral small vessel disease in vivo. The presence of a mixed supplied hippocampus was an advantage in several cognitive domains, including verbal list learning and global cognition. A mixed supplied hippocampus also was an advantage for verbal memory performance in cerebral small vessel disease. Voxel-based morphometry showed higher anterior hippocampal grey matter volume in mixed, compared to single supply. We discuss that a mixed hippocampal supply, as opposed to a single one, may increase the reliability of hippocampal blood supply and thereby provide a hippocampal vascular reserve that protects against cognitive impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awz383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7009470PMC
February 2020

Social targets improve body-based and environment-based strategies during spatial navigation.

Exp Brain Res 2018 03 11;236(3):755-764. Epub 2018 Jan 11.

Aging and Cognition Research Group, DZNE, 39120, Magdeburg, Germany.

Encoding the position of another person in space is vital for everyday life. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific navigational strategies associated with encoding the position of another person in the wider spatial environment. We asked two groups of participants to learn the location of a target (person or object) during active navigation, while optic flow information, a landmark, or both optic flow information and a landmark were available in a virtual environment. Whereas optic flow information is used for body-based encoding, such as the simulation of motor movements, landmarks are used to form an abstract, disembodied representation of the environment. During testing, we passively moved participants through virtual space, and compared their abilities to correctly decide whether the non-visible target was before or behind them. Using psychometric functions and the Bayes Theorem, we show that both groups assigned similar weights to body-based and environment-based cues in the condition, where both cue types were available. However, the group who was provided with a person as target showed generally reduced position errors compared to the group who was provided with an object as target. We replicated this effect in a second study with novel participants. This indicates a social advantage in spatial encoding, with facilitated processing of both body-based and environment-based cues during spatial navigation when the position of a person is encoded. This may underlie our critical ability to make accurate distance judgments during social interactions, for example, during fight or flight responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5169-7DOI Listing
March 2018