Publications by authors named "Jan J Pomorski"

3 Publications

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Development of microsatellite loci and optimization of a multiplex assay for Latibulus argiolus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), the specialized parasitoid of paper wasps.

Sci Rep 2020 09 30;10(1):16068. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Museum and Institute of Zoology Polish Academy of Sciences, Wilcza 64, 00-679, Warsaw, Poland.

Microsatellite loci are commonly used markers in population genetic studies. In this study, we present 40 novel and polymorphic microsatellite loci elaborated for the ichneumonid parasitoid Latibulus argiolus (Rossi, 1790). Reaction condition optimisation procedures allowed 14 of these loci to be co-amplified in two PCRs and loaded in two multiplex panels onto a genetic analyser. The assay was tested on 197 individuals of L. argiolus originating from ten natural populations obtained from the host nests of paper wasps. The validated loci were polymorphic with high allele numbers ranging from eight to 27 (average 17.6 alleles per locus). Both observed and expected heterozygosity values were high, ranging between 0.75 and 0.92 for H (mean 0.83) and from 0.70 to 0.90 for H (mean 0.85). The optimized assay showed low genotyping error rate and negligible null allele frequency. The designed multiplex panels could be successfully applied in relatedness analyses and genetic variability studies of L. argiolus populations, which would be particularly interesting considering the coevolutionary context of this species with its social host.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-72923-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7527953PMC
September 2020

Sequencing and Analysis of the Complete Organellar Genomes of .

Front Plant Sci 2020 1;11:1296. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Microbiology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

Of the genus, has the highest clinical significance in humans. However, neither nuclear nor organellar genomes of this species were sequenced until now. The hitherto determined and analyzed mitochondrial and plastid genomes of the alleged species belong in fact to another species, recently named e. This study provides a first insight into the organellar genomes of a true (type strain ATCC 16529). The mitochondrion had a 53.8-kb genome, which was considerably larger than that of (formerly gen. 1) and (formerly gen. 2), yet similarly functional, with the differences in size attributable to a higher number of introns and the presence of extra unique putative genes. The 48-kb plastid genome of , compared to autotrophic Trebouxiophyceae, was highly reduced due to the elimination of the photosynthesis-related genes. The gene content of the plastid genome of was, however, very similar to other colorless species. Plastid genome-based phylogeny reinforced the polyphyly of the genus , with and branching within clades of species. Phylogenetic reconstruction also confirmed the close relationship of and , which is reflected in the synteny of their organellar genomes. Interestingly, the entire set of genes was lost in plastid genome while being preserved in .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2020.01296DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7492744PMC
September 2020

Cytochrome gene () sequence diversity in a population from Bialowieza Primeval Forest.

Acta Theriol (Warsz) 2013 Apr 5;58(2):119-126. Epub 2012 Sep 5.

Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wilcza 64, 00-679 Warsaw, Poland.

Based on published information about the glacial, postglacial, and recent distribution of the root vole, , we hypothesized that a population inhabiting the pristine wetland in eastern Poland (Bialowieza Primeval Forest) might comprise a high diversity of haplotypes. The support for this hypothesis was provided by an analysis of partial gene sequences from 149 voles sampled within a two-hectare plot during a nine-year study. In this population, we identified eight haplotypes (PLB1-PLB8), four of which were new to the root vole. These haplotypes were characterized by low nucleotide diversity ( = 0.0054, SE = 0.0019), the absence of transversional differences between sequences, and no changes in the encoded amino acid sequence: features suggesting a lack of immigration from the distant populations. The haplotype number and their frequency distribution in males and females did not differ significantly. An assessment of the persistence of matrilines in the local population throughout the study period revealed that the haplotype composition was relatively stable for only about 3 years. A more complete haplotype network for root voles in Europe was constructed by combining the newly identified haplotypes with the 45 previously described haplotypes. Two of the haplotypes detected in this study occupy key positions in this network: PLB5, as the closest link to the North European group, and PLB8, as an ancestor to many other Central European haplotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13364-012-0096-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3606515PMC
April 2013