Publications by authors named "Jan Belohlavek"

111 Publications

Post MI Ventricular Septal Defect Treated by Percutaneous Implantation of Figulla Flex ASD Occluder.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2021 Jul 7. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Radiology Department, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2021.04.045DOI Listing
July 2021

Efficacy of dapagliflozin in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction according to body mass index.

Eur J Heart Fail 2021 Jul 16. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Background: In heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), there is an "obesity paradox", where survival is better in patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) and weight loss is associated with worse outcomes. We examined the effect of a SGLT2 inhibitor according to baseline BMI in the Dapagliflozin And Prevention of Adverse-outcomes in Heart Failure trial (DAPA-HF).

Methods And Results: BMI was examined using standard categories i.e. underweight (<18.5 kg/m ); normal weight (18.5-24.9 Kg/m ); overweight (25.0-29.9 Kg/m ); obesity class I (30.0-34.9 Kg/m ); class II (35.0-39.9 Kg/m ) and class III (≥40 Kg/m ). The primary outcome in DAPA-HF was the composite of worsening heart failure or cardiovascular death. Overall, 1348 patients (28.4%) were under/normal-weight, 1722 (36.3%) overweight, 1013 (21.4%) obesity class I and 659 (13.9%) obesity class II/III. The unadjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) for the primary outcome with obesity category 1, the lowest risk group, as reference was: under-/normal-weight 1.41 (1.16-1.71), overweight 1.18 (0.97-1.42), obesity class II/III 1.37 (1.10-1.72). Patients with class I obesity were also at lowest risk of death. The effect of dapagliflozin on the primary outcome and other outcomes did not vary by baseline BMI e.g., HR for primary outcome: under-/normal-weight 0.74 (0.58-0.94), overweight 0.81 (0.65-1.02), obesity class I 0.68 (0.50-0.92), obesity class II/III 0.71 (0.51-1.00); P for interaction=0.79. The mean decrease in weight at 8 months with dapagliflozin was 0.9 (0.7-1.1) Kg (p<0.001).

Conclusion: We confirmed an "obesity survival paradox" in HFrEF. We showed that dapagliflozin was beneficial across the wide range of BMI studied.

Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT03036124 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03036124).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejhf.2308DOI Listing
July 2021

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for COVID-19 during first and second waves.

Lancet Respir Med 2021 Jun 16. Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Cardio‑Thoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands; Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(21)00262-9DOI Listing
June 2021

Hypothermia versus Normothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

N Engl J Med 2021 06;384(24):2283-2294

From the Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Sections of Cardiology (J. Dankiewicz, D.E.), Neurology (T. Cronberg, G.L.), and Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (H. Levin, O.B.), Skåne University Hospital Lund, Lund University and Clinical Studies Sweden - Forum South, Skåne University Hospital (S.U.), Lund; the Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Section of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Malmö, (J. Düring, S.S., H.F.); the Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Sections of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (M.A., N.N.) and Clinical Sciences Helsingborg (N.N.), Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg; the Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Section of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Lund, Hallands Hospital, Halmstad (J.U.); the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (C.R., A. Lundin); the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Center for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm (P.N., J. Hollenberg, A.A.); and the Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care, and Acute Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping (M.S.C.) - all in Sweden; Copenhagen Trial Unit, Center for Clinical Intervention Research, Copenhagen University Hospital (J.C.J.), and the Section of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (T.L.), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, the Department of Regional Health Research, the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (J.C.J.), the Research Center for Emergency Medicine, the Department of Clinical Medicine (H.K.), and the Department of Intensive Care (A.M.G., S.C.), Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus - all in Denmark; Adult Critical Care, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (M.P.W., M.P.G.M., J.M.C.), the Department of Intensive Care, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (M.T., J. Bewley, K.S.), Essex Cardiothoracic Centre, Basildon (T.R.K., G.V.K.), Anglia Ruskin University School of Medicine, Chelmsford, Essex (T.R.K., G.V.K.), and the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (P.M.) - all in the United Kingdom; Neuroscience Critical Care Research Group and Adult Intensive Care Medicine Service, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois-Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne (M. Oddo, S.A.-M.), the Departments of Intensive Care Medicine (M.H.) and Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Inselspital (A. Levis), Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, the Intensive Care Department, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen (C. Schrag, E.F.), the Institute of Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (M.M., P.D.W.G.), and the Cardiac Anesthesia and Intensive Care Department, Instituto Cardiocentro Ticino, Lugano (T. Cassina) - all in Switzerland; Descartes University of Paris and Cochin University Hospital, Paris (A.C., P.J.), Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Dupuytren Teaching Hospital, Limoges (P.V.) - all in France; the 2nd Department of Medicine (J. Bělohlávek, O.S.), and the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (M. Otáhal), General University Hospital and First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, the 1st Department of Internal Medicine-Cardioangiology, University Hospital Hradec Králové, and Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Hradec Králové (M. Solar) - all in the Czech Republic; the Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (J. Hovdenes), the Department of Anesthesiology, Sørlandet Hospital, Arendal (R.B.O.), the Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, St. Olav's University Hospital, and the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (H. Langeland) - all in Norway; the Division of Critical Care and Trauma, George Institute for Global Health, and Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney (M. Saxena), and the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (G.M.E., A.D.N.), and the Department of Intensive Care, Alfred Health (A.D.N.), Monash University, Melbourne - all in Australia; the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, Intensive Care Unit, Wellington Hospital, Wellington (P.J.Y., L.N.); the Departments of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics (P.P.) and Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, San Martino Policlinico Hospital, IRCCS for Oncology and Neuroscience (P.P., I.B.), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; the Department of Nephrology and Medical Intensive Care (C. Storm), and Klinik und Hochschulambulanz für Neurologie (C.L.), Charité Universitätzmedizin, Berlin, Germany; the Department of Intensive Care, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (F.S.T.); the Division of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria (M.J.); the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (C.C.); and University College Dublin Clinical Research Centre at St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland (A.D.N.).

Background: Targeted temperature management is recommended for patients after cardiac arrest, but the supporting evidence is of low certainty.

Methods: In an open-label trial with blinded assessment of outcomes, we randomly assigned 1900 adults with coma who had had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac or unknown cause to undergo targeted hypothermia at 33°C, followed by controlled rewarming, or targeted normothermia with early treatment of fever (body temperature, ≥37.8°C). The primary outcome was death from any cause at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included functional outcome at 6 months as assessed with the modified Rankin scale. Prespecified subgroups were defined according to sex, age, initial cardiac rhythm, time to return of spontaneous circulation, and presence or absence of shock on admission. Prespecified adverse events were pneumonia, sepsis, bleeding, arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise, and skin complications related to the temperature management device.

Results: A total of 1850 patients were evaluated for the primary outcome. At 6 months, 465 of 925 patients (50%) in the hypothermia group had died, as compared with 446 of 925 (48%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.14; P = 0.37). Of the 1747 patients in whom the functional outcome was assessed, 488 of 881 (55%) in the hypothermia group had moderately severe disability or worse (modified Rankin scale score ≥4), as compared with 479 of 866 (55%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.09). Outcomes were consistent in the prespecified subgroups. Arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise was more common in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group (24% vs. 17%, P<0.001). The incidence of other adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups.

Conclusions: In patients with coma after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, targeted hypothermia did not lead to a lower incidence of death by 6 months than targeted normothermia. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council and others; TTM2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02908308.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2100591DOI Listing
June 2021

The mechanical support of cardiogenic shock.

Curr Opin Crit Care 2021 08;27(4):440-446

2nd Department of Medicine - Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Purpose Of Review: Cardiogenic shock (CS) therapy involving catecholamines, inotropes, fluids and revascularization is often insufficient, and short-term mortality remains 50%. Different treatment algorithms and mechanical circulatory support devices (MCS) have been increasingly used in the treatment of CS. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a major challenge faced by intensive care medicine providers inevitably influencing also CS management.

Recent Findings: There is a lack of prospective data as well as international consensus regarding CS classification, patient risk stratification, and MCS use. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is considered the first line MCS in refractory CS and Impella the MCS of choice for the left ventricle unloading. Several ongoing randomized trials will provide much-needed evidence for MCS use in the coming years. COVID-19 infection is associated with several cardiovascular disorders complicated by CS and more data regarding the prevalence and mortality of CS during COVID-19 infection are needed.

Summary: This review summarizes current trends in the use of MCS in CS and discusses differences in CS management during the COVID-19 pandemic. Careful patient selection, early MCS initiation, and comprehensive intensive care by experienced team is key to successful outcome in patients with refractory CS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCC.0000000000000837DOI Listing
August 2021

Left ventricular unloading and the role of ECpella.

Eur Heart J Suppl 2021 Mar 27;23(Suppl A):A27-A34. Epub 2021 Mar 27.

Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The main reason for the emergency implantation of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) is the restoration of adequate systemic perfusion, while protecting the failing heart and promoting myocardial recovery are equally important goals. Following initial haemodynamic stabilization and often the urgent revascularization of the culprit lesion, the clinical focus is then directed towards the most efficient strategy for cardioprotection. Frequent echocardiography measurements may help to estimate the degree of unwanted left ventricular (LV) overloading during VA-ECMO. Additionally, the estimation of high LV filling pressures by Doppler echocardiography or their (in-)direct measurement using a dedicated surgical left atrial pressure line and conventional pulmonary artery catheter in a wedge position or a pigtail catheter in the left ventricle can be performed. Mechanical overload of the left ventricle is the major adverse effect and an obvious mechanistic and prognostic challenge of contemporary ECMO care. Many efforts are under way to overcome this phenomenon by LV unloading, which was effectively achieved by the current combined approach using an axial decompression device, while novel technical developments and approaches are tested and urgently anticipated. The aim of this report is to introduce in depth pathophysiological background, current concepts, and future perspectives in LV unloading strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/suab006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8005882PMC
March 2021

Increased Cardiopulmonary Fitness Is Associated with a Greater Reduction in Depression among People Who Underwent Bariatric Surgery.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 03 3;18(5). Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Human Performance and Sports Science Laboratory, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Murcia, 30720 Murcia, Spain.

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of changes in cardiopulmonary fitness on the mental health of patients with severe obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery (prior to and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery). Study participants were recruited from among patients of a regional hospital in Czechia who underwent gastric bypass surgery between April 2018 and October 2019. They were eligible if they (a) were between 18 and 65 years old, (b) provided written informed consent, and (c) were able to walk independently. Twenty-six patients (age 45.4 ± 9.0 years, body mass index 45.1 ± 7.4 kg·m, body fat 43.8 ± 4.8%) were included in the analysis. The key finding revealed that the greater the increase in cardiopulmonary fitness (i.e., longer distance walked in the six-minute walk test, 6MWT), the better the improvement in depression score among patients who underwent bariatric surgery. In particular, increments of 10 m in the 6MWT lead to the improvement of 0.5 points on the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire. As the main implication, these results suggest that patients should participate in exercise training programs to increase their fitness status for optimal physical and mental outcomes of bariatric surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052508DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967516PMC
March 2021

Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Postcardiotomy Shock-Analysis of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry.

Crit Care Med 2021 Jul;49(7):1107-1117

Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart and Vascular Centre, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Objectives: Refractory postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock complicating cardiac surgery yields nearly 100% mortality when untreated. Use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock has increased worldwide recently. The aim of the current analysis was to outline the trends in use, changing patient profiles, and in-hospital outcomes including complications in patients undergoing venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock.

Design: Analysis of extracorporeal life support organization registry from January 2010 to December 2018.

Setting: Multicenter worldwide registry.

Patients: Seven-thousand one-hundred eighty-five patients supported with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock.

Interventions: Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Measurements And Main Results: Hospital death, weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hospital complications. Mortality predictors were assessed by multivariable logistic regression. Propensity score matching was performed for comparison of peripheral and central cannulation for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A significant trend toward more extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in recent years (coefficient, 0.009; p < 0.001) was found. Mean age was 56.3 ± 14.9 years and significantly increased over time (coefficient, 0.513; p < 0.001). Most commonly, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was instituted after coronary artery bypass surgery (26.8%) and valvular surgery (25.6%), followed by heart transplantation (20.7%). Overall, successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation weaning was possible in 4,520 cases (56.4%), and survival to hospital discharge was achieved in 41.7% of cases. In-hospital mortality rates remained constant over time (coefficient, -8.775; p = 0.682), whereas complication rates were significantly reduced (coefficient, -0.009; p = 0.003). Higher mortality was observed after coronary artery bypass surgery (65.4%), combined coronary artery bypass surgery with valve (68.4%), and aortic (69.6%) procedures than other indications. Lower mortality rates were observed in heart transplantation recipients (46.0%). Age (p < 0.001), central cannulation (p < 0.001), and occurrence of complications while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were independently associated with poorer prognosis.

Conclusions: The analysis confirmed increased use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock. Mortality rates remained relatively constant over time despite a decrease in complications, in the setting of supporting older patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000004922DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8217275PMC
July 2021

Dual veno-arterial extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation support in a patient with refractory hyperdynamic septic shock: a case report.

Perfusion 2021 Feb 26:267659121998962. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Department of Anaesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

The hypodynamic septic shock appears to be a promising indication to veno-arterial membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support of a patient with insufficient cardiac output. With cardiac recovery most of those patients progress into a hyperdynamic septic shock with cardiac output, which may not match critically low systemic vascular resistance to maintain perfusion pressures. Such refractory distributive shock represents a challenging indication to VA-ECMO. We report a rare case of a 27-year old patient who developed severe refractory hypodynamic septic shock due to the bilateral staphylococcal pneumonia and had to be initially rescued by femoro-femoral VA-ECMO. Despite extensive measures, he remained in intractable hypotension and profound tissue hypoperfusion with imminent multiorgan failure. The commencement of a second jugulo-axillary VA ECMO secured a total blood flow of 14.3 L/min, which restored perfusion pressure and successfully bridged patient over the period of critical haemodynamic instability and ultimately may have facilitated recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659121998962DOI Listing
February 2021

Extracorporeal life support in COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome: A EuroELSO international survey.

Artif Organs 2021 May 28;45(5):495-505. Epub 2021 Mar 28.

Interdisciplinary COVID-19-Center, University Medical Centre, Saarland University, Homburg, Germany.

Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a means to support patients with acute respiratory failure. Initially, recommendations to treat severe cases of pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with ECLS have been restrained. In the meantime, ECLS has been shown to produce similar outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 compared to existing data on ARDS mortality. We performed an international email survey to assess how ECLS providers worldwide have previously used ECLS during the treatment of critically ill patients with COVID-19. A questionnaire with 45 questions (covering, e.g., indication, technical aspects, benefit, and reasons for treatment discontinuation), mostly multiple choice, was distributed by email to ECLS centers. The survey was approved by the European branch of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO); 276 ECMO professionals from 98 centers in 30 different countries on four continents reported that they employed ECMO for very severe COVID-19 cases, mostly in veno-venous configuration (87%). The most common reason to establish ECLS was isolated hypoxemic respiratory failure (50%), followed by a combination of hypoxemia and hypercapnia (39%). Only a small fraction of patients required veno-arterial cannulation due to heart failure (3%). Time on ECLS varied between less than 2 and more than 4 weeks. The main reason to discontinue ECLS treatment prior to patient's recovery was lack of clinical improvement (53%), followed by major bleeding, mostly intracranially (13%). Only 4% of respondents reported that triage situations, lack of staff or lack of oxygenators, were responsible for discontinuation of ECLS support. Most ECLS physicians (51%, IQR 30%) agreed that patients with COVID-19-induced ARDS (CARDS) benefitted from ECLS. Overall mortality of COVID-19 patients on ECLS was estimated to be about 55%. ECLS has been utilized successfully during the COVID-19 pandemic to stabilize CARDS patients in hypoxemic or hypercapnic lung failure. Age and multimorbidity limited the use of ECLS. Triage situations were rarely a concern. ECLS providers stated that patients with severe COVID-19 benefitted from ECLS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aor.13940DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8014805PMC
May 2021

ECMO for COVID-19 patients in Europe and Israel.

Intensive Care Med 2021 Mar 9;47(3):344-348. Epub 2021 Jan 9.

2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine General Teaching Hospital and 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, U Nemocnice 2, Praha 2, Prague, 128 00, Czech Republic.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-020-06272-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7796689PMC
March 2021

Dapagliflozin and the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: An Exploratory Analysis From DAPA-HF.

Diabetes Care 2021 Feb 18;44(2):586-594. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, U.K.

Objective: The sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor dapagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular mortality and worsening heart failure in the Dapagliflozin and Prevention of Adverse Outcomes in Heart Failure (DAPA-HF) trial. This report explores the effect of dapagliflozin on incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the cohort without diabetes enrolled in the trial.

Research Design And Methods: The subgroup of 2,605 patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), no prior history of diabetes, and an HbA of <6.5% at baseline was randomized to dapagliflozin 10 mg daily or placebo. In this exploratory analysis, surveillance for new-onset diabetes was accomplished through periodic HbA testing as part of the study protocol and comparison between the treatment groups assessed through a Cox proportional hazards model.

Results: At baseline, the mean HbA was 5.8%. At 8 months, there were minimal changes, with a placebo-adjusted change in the dapagliflozin group of -0.04%. Over a median follow-up of 18 months, diabetes developed in 93 of 1,307 patients (7.1%) in the placebo group and 64 of 1,298 (4.9%) in the dapagliflozin group. Dapagliflozin led to a 32% reduction in diabetes incidence (hazard ratio 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.94; = 0.019). More than 95% of the participants who developed T2D had prediabetes at baseline (HbA 5.7-6.4%). Participants who developed diabetes in DAPA-HF had a higher subsequent mortality than those who did not.

Conclusions: In this exploratory analysis among patients with HFrEF, treatment with dapagliflozin reduced the incidence of new diabetes. This potential benefit needs confirmation in trials of longer duration and in people without heart failure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc20-1675DOI Listing
February 2021

Effects of a Novel Nitroxyl Donor in Acute Heart Failure: The STAND-UP AHF Study.

JACC Heart Fail 2021 02 25;9(2):146-157. Epub 2020 Nov 25.

Bristol-Myers-Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey, USA.

Objectives: The primary objective was to identify well-tolerated doses of cimlanod in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Secondary objectives were to identify signals of efficacy, including biomarkers, symptoms, and clinical events.

Background: Nitroxyl (HNO) donors have vasodilator, inotropic and lusitropic effects. Bristol-Myers Squibb-986231 (cimlanod) is an HNO donor being developed for acute heart failure (AHF).

Methods: This was a phase IIb, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 48-h treatment with cimlanod compared with placebo in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40% hospitalized for AHF. In part I, patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to escalating doses of cimlanod or matching placebo. In part II, patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to either of the 2 highest tolerated doses of cimlanod from part I or placebo. The primary endpoint was the rate of clinically relevant hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg or patients became symptomatic).

Results: In part I (n = 100), clinically relevant hypotension was more common with cimlanod than placebo (20% vs. 8%; relative risk [RR]: 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83 to 14.53). In part II (n = 222), the incidence of clinically relevant hypotension was 18% for placebo, 21% for cimlanod 6 μg/kg/min (RR: 1.15; 95% CI: 0.58 to 2.43), and 35% for cimlanod 12 μg/kg/min (RR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.04 to 3.59). N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and bilirubin decreased during infusion of cimlanod treatment compared with placebo, but these differences did not persist after treatment discontinuation.

Conclusions: Cimlanod at a dose of 6 μg/kg/min was reasonably well-tolerated compared with placebo. Cimlanod reduced markers of congestion, but this did not persist beyond the treatment period. (Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of 48-Hour Infusions of HNO (Nitroxyl) Donor in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure [STANDUP AHF]; NCT03016325).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchf.2020.10.012DOI Listing
February 2021

Transaortic or Pulmonary Artery Drainage for Left Ventricular Unloading in Venoarterial Extracorporeal Life Support: A Porcine Cardiogenic Shock Model.

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2020 Nov 7. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

ECLS Centrum, Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Department, Heart & Vascular Centre, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (MUMC), Maastricht, The Netherlands; Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

The peripheral venoarterial extracorporeal life support (V-A ECLS) in cardiogenic shock (CS) may lead to LV overload. The transaortic suction device (Impella, ABIOMED Inc., Danvers, MA) was compared to the pulmonary artery (PA) drainage, for LV unloading efficacy during V-A ECLS in a porcine cardiogenic shock model. A dedicated CS model included 12 swine (21 ± 1.8-week-old and weighing 54.3 ± 4.6 kg) supported with V-A ECLS and randomized to Impella or PA-related LV drainage. LV unloading and end-organ perfusion were evaluated through the PA catheter and LV pressure/volume analysis. The LV end-diastolic volume sharply dropped with Impella (143.6 ± 67.4 vs 123 ± 75.7 mL) compared to a slight decrease in the PA cannula group (134.1 ± 39.9 vs 130.1 ± 34.7 mL), resulting in an overall stroke work and pressure-volume area reductions with both techniques. However, stroke work reduction was more significant in the Impella group (V-A ECLS 3998.8 ± 2027.6 vs V-A ECLS + Impella 1796.9 ± 1033.9 mm Hg × mL, P = 0.016), leading to a more consistent pressure-volume area reduction (Impella reduction 34.7% vs PA cannula reduction 9.7%) In terms of end organ perfusion, central and mixed O saturation improved with V-A ECLS, and subsequently, remaining unchanged with either Impella or PA cannula as unloading strategy (SVmO2: Impella 86.0 ± 5.8 vs 87.8 ± 5.8; PA cannula 82.5 ± 10.7 vs 82.5 ± 11.3 %). Transaortic suction and PA drainage provided effective LV unloading during V-A ECLS while maintaining adequate end-organ perfusion. Impella provides a greater LV unloading effect and reduces more effectively the total LV stroke work.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.semtcvs.2020.11.001DOI Listing
November 2020

Targeted hypothermia versus targeted normothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a statistical analysis plan.

Trials 2020 Oct 7;21(1):831. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Anesthesia & Intensive Care, Lund University, Helsingborg Hospital, Lund, Sweden.

Background: To date, targeted temperature management (TTM) is the only neuroprotective intervention after resuscitation from cardiac arrest that is recommended by guidelines. The evidence on the effects of TTM is unclear.

Methods/design: The Targeted Hypothermia Versus Targeted Normothermia After Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (TTM2) trial is an international, multicentre, parallel group, investigator-initiated, randomised, superiority trial in which TTM with a target temperature of 33 °C after cardiac arrest will be compared with a strategy to maintain normothermia and active treatment of fever (≥ 37.8 °C). Prognosticators, outcome assessors, the steering group, the trial coordinating team, and trial statisticians will be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome will be all-cause mortality at 180 days after randomisation. We estimate a 55% mortality in the targeted normothermia group. To detect an absolute risk reduction of 7.5% with an alpha of 0.05 and 90% power, 1900 participants will be enrolled. The secondary neurological outcome will be poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale 4-6) at 180 days after cardiac arrest. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis plan is presented, including a comprehensive description of the statistical analyses, handling of missing data, and assessments of underlying statistical assumptions. Final analyses will be conducted independently by two qualified statisticians following the present plan.

Discussion: This SAP, which was prepared before completion of enrolment, should increase the validity of the TTM trial by mitigation of analysis-bias.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-020-04654-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7542893PMC
October 2020

Why is the clinical response to cardiac resynchronization better in LBBB patients?

ESC Heart Fail 2020 Sep 18. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Department of Medical Biophysics, Charles University, Medical Faculty, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic.

Aims: The improved clinical response in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) over LBBB-free patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D) is commonly attributed to an LBBB abnormality. We aimed to find an alternative explanation.

Methods And Results: We analysed an immediate effect of selecting the LBBB group of patients in a cohort of 63 non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy (non-ICM) and 83 ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) patients treated with CRT-D; 75% of non-ICM and 51% of ICM patients had an LBBB abnormality on the electrocardiogram, with a significant difference (P = 0.0032 by χ ). As a result of this difference, the proportion of non-ICM patients increased from 43% in the primary cohort to 53% in LBBB selection and decreased to 28% in non-LBBB group. By nonparametric survival analysis, the hazard ratio in non-ICM patients in the LBBB selection decreased from 0.48 (P = 0.0488) to 0.36 (P = 0.0251) and increased in the non-LBBB group to 0.75 (P = 0.6496). Any comparison of LBBB and non-LBBB groups must compare sets with a significantly altered proportion of patients of different aetiologies. Most publications on LBBB patients are erroneous because they compare LBBB with non-LBBB groups, not taking into account that the groups have been substantially changed by the selection process.

Conclusions: The declared outcome of the LBBB groups reflects inevitably the survival outcome of their non-ICM patients and not the intended outcome of patients with LBBB. CRT-D in patients with different aetiologies of cardiomyopathy calls for separate evaluation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.12893DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7754895PMC
September 2020

The detrimental effect of COVID-19 nationwide quarantine on accelerometer-assessed physical activity of heart failure patients.

ESC Heart Fail 2020 10 22;7(5):2093-2097. Epub 2020 Jul 22.

2nd Department of Medicine-Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Aims: A reduction of habitual physical activity due to prolonged COVID-19 quarantine can have serious consequences for patients with cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure. This study aimed to explore the effect of COVID-19 nationwide quarantine on accelerometer-assessed physical activity of heart failure patients.

Methods And Results: We analysed the daily number of steps in 26 heart failure patients during a 6-week period that included 3 weeks immediately preceding the onset of the quarantine and the first 3 weeks of the quarantine. The daily number of steps was assessed using a wrist-worn accelerometer worn by the patients as part of an ongoing randomized controlled trial. Multilevel modelling was used to explore the effect of the quarantine on the daily step count adjusted for weather conditions. As compared with the 3 weeks before the onset of the quarantine, the step count was significantly lower during each of the first 3 weeks of the quarantine (P < 0.05). When the daily step count was averaged across the 3 weeks before and during the quarantine, the decrease amounted to 1134 (SE 189) steps per day (P < 0.001), which translated to a 16.2% decrease.

Conclusions: The introduction of the nationwide quarantine due to COVID-19 had a detrimental effect on the level of habitual physical activity in heart failure patients, leading to an abrupt decrease of daily step count that lasted for at least the 3-week study period. Staying active and maintaining sufficient levels of physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic are essential despite the unfavourable circumstances of quarantine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.12916DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7405478PMC
October 2020

Dapagliflozin and Diuretic Use in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction in DAPA-HF.

Circulation 2020 Sep 16;142(11):1040-1054. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, UK (A.M.J., P.D., K.F.D., P.S.J., J.J.V.M.).

Background: In the DAPA-HF trial (Dapagliflozin and Prevention of Adverse-Outcomes in Heart Failure), the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor dapagliflozin reduced the risk of worsening heart failure and death in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. We examined the efficacy and tolerability of dapagliflozin in relation to background diuretic treatment and change in diuretic therapy after randomization to dapagliflozin or placebo.

Methods: We examined the effects of study treatment in the following subgroups: no diuretic and diuretic dose equivalent to furosemide <40, 40, and >40 mg daily at baseline. We examined the primary composite end point of cardiovascular death or a worsening heart failure event and its components, all-cause death and symptoms.

Results: Of 4616 analyzable patients, 736 (15.9%) were on no diuretic, 1311 (28.4%) were on <40 mg, 1365 (29.6%) were on 40 mg, and 1204 (26.1%) were taking >40 mg. Compared with placebo, dapagliflozin reduced the risk of the primary end point across each of these subgroups: hazard ratios were 0.57 (95% CI, 0.36-0.92), 0.83 (95% CI, 0.63-1.10), 0.77 (95% CI, 0.60-0.99), and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.63-0.97), respectively ( for interaction=0.61). The hazard ratio in patients taking any diuretic was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.68-0.90). Improvements in symptoms and treatment toleration were consistent across the diuretic subgroups. Diuretic dose did not change in most patients during follow-up, and mean diuretic dose did not differ between the dapagliflozin and placebo groups after randomization.

Conclusions: The efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin were consistent across the diuretic subgroups examined in DAPA-HF. Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT03036124.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.047077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7664959PMC
September 2020

Giant cell myocarditis in an older patient - reassessing the threshold for endomyocardial biopsy.

ESC Heart Fail 2020 10 9;7(5):3165-3168. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

2nd Department of Medicine - Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Giant cell myocarditis is a rare form of autoimmune myocarditis with high morbidity and mortality that affects mainly middle-aged adults. We report a case study of a 70-year-old man on chronic immunosuppression who presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia and symptoms of acute systolic heart failure, both with poor response to standard measures. A decision to pursue endomyocardial biopsy established the diagnosis of GCM and lead to initiation of immunosuppressive therapy and a favourable outcome. Our case illustrates that a low threshold for endomyocardial biopsy in new onset heart failure can lead to actionable information even in patients of advanced age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.12756DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7524070PMC
October 2020

Advances in accelerometry for cardiovascular patients: a systematic review with practical recommendations.

ESC Heart Fail 2020 10 3;7(5):2021-2031. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

2nd Department of Medicine-Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Aims: Accelerometers are becoming increasingly commonplace for assessing physical activity; however, their use in patients with cardiovascular diseases is relatively substandard. We aimed to systematically review the methods used for collecting and processing accelerometer data in cardiology, using the example of heart failure, and to provide practical recommendations on how to improve objective physical activity assessment in patients with cardiovascular diseases by using accelerometers.

Methods And Results: Four electronic databases were searched up to September 2019 for observational, interventional, and validation studies using accelerometers to assess physical activity in patients with heart failure. Study and population characteristics, details of accelerometry data collection and processing, and description of physical activity metrics were extracted from the eligible studies and synthesized. To assess the quality and completeness of accelerometer reporting, the studies were scored using 12 items on data collection and processing, such as the placement of accelerometer, days of data collected, and criteria for non-wear of the accelerometer. In 60 eligible studies with 3500 patients (of those, 536 were heart failure with preserved ejection fraction patients), a wide variety of accelerometer brands (n = 27) and models (n = 46) were used, with Actigraph being the most frequent (n = 12), followed by Fitbit (n = 5). The accelerometer was usually worn on the hip (n = 32), and the most prevalent wear period was 7 days (n = 22). The median wear time required for a valid day was 600 min, and between two and five valid days was required for a patient to be included in the analysis. The most common measures of physical activity were steps (n = 20), activity counts (n = 15), and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (n = 14). Only three studies validated accelerometers in a heart failure population, showing that their accuracy deteriorates at slower speeds. Studies failed to report between one and six (median 4) of the 12 scored items, with non-wear time criteria and valid day definition being the most underreported items.

Conclusions: The use of accelerometers in cardiology lacks consistency and reporting on data collection, and processing methods need to be improved. Furthermore, calculating metrics based on raw acceleration and machine learning techniques is lacking, opening the opportunity for future exploration. Therefore, we encourage researchers and clinicians to improve the quality and transparency of data collection and processing by following our proposed practical recommendations for using accelerometers in patients with cardiovascular diseases, which are outlined in the article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.12781DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7524133PMC
October 2020

Efficacy and safety of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibition according to left ventricular ejection fraction in DAPA-HF.

Eur J Heart Fail 2020 07 15;22(7):1247-1258. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

Aims: The aim of this study was to examine whether left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) modified efficacy and safety of dapagliflozin 10 mg compared with placebo in the 4744 patients with LVEF ≤40% randomized in the Dapagliflozin And Prevention of Adverse-outcomes in Heart Failure trial (DAPA-HF).

Methods And Results: We examined whether LVEF, analysed categorically or continuously, modified the effect of dapagliflozin. The primary efficacy outcome was the composite of a worsening heart failure (HF) event (unplanned HF hospitalization/an urgent HF visit requiring intravenous therapy) or cardiovascular death. Mean LVEF was 31.1% and LVEF categories analysed were: <26% (n = 1143), 26-30% (n = 1018), 31-35% (n = 1187), and >35% (n = 1396). Each 5% decrease in LVEF was associated with a higher risk of the primary outcome [hazard ratio (HR) 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.24]. The benefit of dapagliflozin was consistent across the spectrum of LVEF: the dapagliflozin vs. placebo HR was 0.75 (95% CI 0.59-0.95) for LVEF <26%, 0.75 (0.57-0.98) for LVEF 26-30%, 0.67 (0.51-0.89) for LVEF 31-35%, and 0.83 (0.63-1.09) for LVEF >35% (P for interaction = 0.762). Similarly, the effect of dapagliflozin on the components of the primary endpoint was not modified by baseline LVEF (P for interaction for cardiovascular death = 0.974, and for worsening HF = 0.161). Safety of dapagliflozin was also consistent across the range of LVEF and neither efficacy nor safety were modified by diabetes status.

Conclusion: Left ventricular ejection fraction was a significant predictor of hospitalization and mortality in patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction but did not modify the beneficial effect of dapagliflozin, overall or separately, in patients with and without diabetes.

Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03036124.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejhf.1867DOI Listing
July 2020

Pressure and flow properties of dual-lumen cannulae for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Perfusion 2020 11 5;35(8):736-744. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Workgroup on Innovation and Technology in ECLS, EuroELSO, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Introduction: In the last decade, dual-lumen cannulae have been increasingly applied in patients undergoing extracorporeal life support. Well-performing vascular access is crucial for efficient extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support; thus, guidance for proper cannulae size is required. Pressure-flow charts provided by manufacturers are often based on tests performed using water, rarely blood. However, blood is a shear-thinning and viscoelastic fluid characterized by different flow properties than water.

Methods: We performed a study evaluating pressure-flow curves during standardized conditions using human whole blood in two commonly available dual-lumen cannulae used in neonates, pediatric, and adult patients. Results were merged and compared with the manufacturer's corresponding curves obtained from the public domain.

Results: The results showed that using blood as compared with water predominantly influenced drainage flow. A 10-80% higher pressure-drop was needed to obtain same drainage flow (hematocrit of 26%) compared with manufacturer's water charts in 13-31 Fr bi-caval dual-lumen cannulae. The same net difference was found in cavo-atrial cannulae (16-32 Fr), where a lower drainage pressure was required (Hct of 26%) compared with the manufacturer's test using blood with an Hct of 33%. Return pressure-flow data were similar, independent whether pumping blood or water, to the data reported by manufacturers.

Conclusion: Non-standardized testing of pressure-flow properties of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation dual-lumen cannulae prevents an adequate prediction of pressure-flow results when these cannulae are used in patients. Properties of dual-lumen cannulae may vary between sizes within same cannula family, in particular concerning the drainage flow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659120926009DOI Listing
November 2020

Mechanical circulatory support for Takotsubo syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Cardiol 2020 10 28;316:31-39. Epub 2020 May 28.

Cardiac Arrest Center, Advanced Heart Failure Unit, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Electronic address:

Background: Cardiogenic shock occurs in 10%-15% of patients with Takotsubo syndrome (TS). For several reasons catecholamines, and especially inotropes, should be avoided in TS. Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) appears attractive as bridge-to-recovery, but prospective studies are lacking. Here we analyze the available literature on MCS use in patients with TS.

Methods And Results: PubMed/Medline was systematically screened until December 2019. 18 studies reporting pooled data of 5629 TS patients, of whom 227 had received MCS, were considered for a qualitative synthesis. 81 articles from 2003 through 2019 reporting individual data of 93 MCS cases were included in a meta-analysis. Median age was 57 (IQR: 43-68) years, 83.9% were women, and a physical trigger could be identified in 74.1% of cases. Median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) before MCS was 20% (IQR: 15-25) and comparable between groups defined by MCS device. An apical TS type was present in 76.1% of cases. The overall number of publications on MCS for TS increased over time, as did those using veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-A ECMO) and Impella, while those using intra-aortic balloon pump declined. MCS-related complications were not regularly reported. Median time on MCS was 3 (IQR: 2-7) days, with an overall survival of 94.6%.

Conclusions: MCS for TS-related shock is increasingly reported, with a growing use of V-A ECMO and Impella. Currently available clinical data support this approach. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate safety and efficacy of different devices as well as timing of MCS in this special patient population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2020.05.033DOI Listing
October 2020

Perception of prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in Europe: an EuroELSO survey.

Perfusion 2020 05;35(1_suppl):81-85

ECMO Centre Karolinska, Department of Pediatric Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

The substantial increase in the number of patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation over the last decade has led to an evolution of indications and an expansion into wider patient groups. One of the unanticipated benefits of the increase in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been a change in the understanding of the natural history of many respiratory diseases. Development in technology and materials, reduced extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-specific complications, and improvement of critical care, in general, have facilitated longer extracorporeal membrane oxygenation runs, and the definition of prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was recently expanded to continuous support for more than 28 days. This survey aimed to describe European ECMO centers' perception and arbitrary definition of prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, patient management, and futility. Of 94 center responses, 37% regarded 14-21 days, 30% 21-28 days, and 28% >28 days as prolonged treatment. Bridge to recovery (64%) or to transplantation (20%) was the most common causes. Awake, and ambulation while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was reported from 34% of the centers. In case of perceived futility, decision to withdraw was taken in 65% of the centers in agreement between profession and family and in 30% by profession only. One-fourth of the centers did not discontinue support. Large differences prevail among European ECMO centers concerning local perception and patient management in prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659120909740DOI Listing
May 2020

Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pheochromocytoma-related shock: treat cause and consequence.

Perfusion 2020 05;35(1_suppl):18-19

2nd Department of Medicine - Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, U Nemocnice 2, 128 08, Praha 2, Czech Republic.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659120909770DOI Listing
May 2020

ECLS Training and Simulation - Evaluation of the 8th Educational Corner of the EuroELSO Congress 2019 Held in Barcelona.

Perfusion 2020 05;35(1_suppl):86-92

2nd Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, General University Hospital in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

Simulation-based learning and hands-on learning are popular in medicine, particularly in areas where life-saving manoeuvres and team skills are required. Simulations can be provided in different environments: directly in hospitals (in situ), in dedicated facilities (simulation rooms) or, on occasion, at scientific meetings, thus taking advantage of the delegates' motivation. Simulation-based learning in extracorporeal life support is also increasingly relevant due to the inherent features of the often difficult and emergent decision-making, approaches and management involved, as well as to the challenging multidisciplinary teamwork. Based on these premises and on the constant rise in interest in starting new extracorporeal life support programmes, the EuroELSO organization has, since the beginning of its scientific activities, established an 'ad hoc' space (Educational Corner) for training and hands-on sessions with a limited number of attendees per session during its annual congress. Experienced trainers deliver repeated dedicated sessions on fundamental aspects of extracorporeal life support management. After several years of sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and delivered to the attendees at the 8th annual congress in Barcelona. More than 90% of the responders indicated that they would recommend the workshop to their colleagues and that they received useful information during the workshops. Over 85% of the responders (85-97%) indicated that the workshops met the set educational goals and objectives and indicated that the simulation sessions would have a positive impact on their daily practice. The Educational Corner during the EuroELSO Congress has achieved great popularity, as shown by the number of attendees participating each year, and presumably improves many technical and behavioural skills among the attendees.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659120909001DOI Listing
May 2020

Perfusion and EuroELSO: A Revolution In Evolution - Indeed an ongoing evolvement - Online adaptation.

Perfusion 2020 05;35(1_suppl)

2nd Department of Medicine - Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659120910035DOI Listing
May 2020
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