Publications by authors named "Jan Bellows"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

First, Do Good!

Authors:
Jan Bellows

J Vet Dent 2021 Oct 7:8987564211046293. Epub 2021 Oct 7.

President, Foundation for Veterinary Dentistry.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/08987564211046293DOI Listing
October 2021

2019 AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2019 Mar/Apr;55(2):49-69

From All Pets Dental, Weston, Florida (J.B.); Beyond the Crown Veterinary Education, Lawrence, Kansas (M.L.B.); Stratham-Newfields Veterinary Hospital, Newfields, New Hampshire (S.D.); Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee (R.H.); Main Street Veterinary Dental Hospital, Flower Mount, Texas (H.B.L.); Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (C.J.S.); Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (A.E.S.S.); and Advanced Pet Dentistry, LLC, Corvallis, Oregon (A.G.VdW.).

The 2019 AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats outline a comprehensive approach to support companion animal practices in improving the oral health and often, the quality of life of their canine and feline patients. The guidelines are an update of the 2013 AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats. A photographically illustrated, 12-step protocol describes the essential steps in an oral health assessment, dental cleaning, and periodontal therapy. Recommendations are given for general anesthesia, pain management, facilities, and equipment necessary for safe and effective delivery of care. To promote the wellbeing of dogs and cats through decreasing the adverse effects and pain of periodontal disease, these guidelines emphasize the critical role of client education and effective, preventive oral healthcare.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5326/JAAHA-MS-6933DOI Listing
August 2019

Evaluating aging in cats: How to determine what is healthy and what is disease.

J Feline Med Surg 2016 07;18(7):551-70

The Iams Company, Mars Pet Care, 6574 State Route 503 North, Lewisburg, OH, USA AK Shoveller's current address is: Department of Animal BioSciences, University of Guelph, ON, Canada.

Practical Relevance: Many of the changes that occur with aging are not considered pathologic and do not negatively affect overall wellness or quality of life. Ruling out disease is essential, however, when attempting to determine whether an aged cat can be considered 'healthy'. A clear understanding of the normal and abnormal changes that are associated with aging in cats can help practitioners make decisions regarding medical management, feeding interventions and additional testing procedures for their aged patients.

Clinical Challenges: It can be difficult to determine if a cat is displaying changes that are appropriate for age. For example, healthy aged cats may have hematologic or serum biochemistry changes that differ from those of the general feline population. Assessment of behavioral health and cognitive changes, as well as auditory, olfactory and visual changes, can also be challenging in the aged patient.

Goals: This is the second of two review articles in a Special Issue devoted to feline healthy aging. The goals of the project culminating in these publications included developing a working definition for healthy aging in feline patients and identifying clinical methods that can be used to accurately classify healthy aged cats. This second review proposes criteria for assessing 'healthy aged cats'.

Evidence Base: There is a paucity of research in feline aging. The authors draw on expert opinion and available data in both the cat and other species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X16649525DOI Listing
July 2016

Aging in cats: Common physical and functional changes.

J Feline Med Surg 2016 07;18(7):533-50

The Iams Company, Mars Pet Care, 6574 State Route 503 North, Lewisburg, OH, USA AK Shoveller's current address is: Department of Animal BioSciences, University of Guelph, ON, Canada.

Practical Relevance: Aged pets comprise a significant proportion of the small animal veterinarian's patient population; in the USA, for example, it was estimated that over 20% of pet cats were 11 years of age or older in 2011. Certain changes associated with aging are neither positive nor negative, but others are less desirable, associated with illness, changes in mobility or the development of unwanted behaviors. These changes can greatly affect the health and wellbeing of the cat and have a tremendous impact on the owner.

Clinical Challenges: Regular veterinary examinations are essential for evaluating the health of older patients and for providing owners with guidance regarding optimal care. With the exception of overt disease, however, it is difficult to definitively determine if a cat is displaying changes that are appropriate for age or if they reflect an abnormal process or condition.

Goals: This is the first of two review articles in a Special Issue devoted to feline healthy aging. The goals of the project culminating in these publications included developing a working definition for healthy aging in feline patients and identifying clinical methods that can be used to accurately classify healthy aged cats. This first review provides a thorough, systems-based overview of common health-related changes observed in cats as they age.

Evidence Base: There is a paucity of research in feline aging. The authors have drawn on expert opinion and available data in both the cat and other species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X16649523DOI Listing
July 2016

Laser and radiosurgery in veterinary dentistry.

Authors:
Jan Bellows

Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2013 May;43(3):651-668

All Pets Dental, 17100 Royal Palm Boulevard, Weston, FL 33326, USA. Electronic address:

Lasers and radiosurgery frequently used in human dentistry are rapidly entering veterinary dental use. The carbon dioxide, diode, and low-level therapy lasers have features including hemostasis control, access to difficult to reach areas, and decreased pain, that make them useful for oral surgery. Periodontal pocket surgery, gingivectomy, gingivoplasty, gingival hyperplasia, operculectomy, tongue surgery, oropharyngeal inflammation therapy, oral mass surgery, crown, and frenectomy laser surgeries are described, including images.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cvsm.2013.02.012DOI Listing
May 2013

2013 AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2013 Mar-Apr;49(2):75-82

Animal Dental Clinic, San Carlos, CA, USA.

Veterinary dentistry is constantly progressing. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and optimize quality of life. Untreated diseases of the oral cavity are painful and can contribute to local and systemic diseases. This article includes guidelines for preventive oral health care, client communication, evaluation, dental cleaning, and treatment. In addition, materials and equipment necessary to perform a medically appropriate procedure are described.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5326/JAAHA-MS-4013DOI Listing
May 2013

Efficacy of a barrier gel for reducing the development of plaque, calculus, and gingivitis in cats.

J Vet Dent 2012 ;29(2):89-94

All Pets Dental, Weston, FL 33326, USA.

This study was performed to assess the field efficacy of a professional and home-care barrier gel against the development of plaque, calculus, gingival bleeding, and gingivitis in client-owned cats over a 56-day period compared with negative controls. In a randomized, negative-controlled, outcome evaluator-blinded, client-owned animal clinical field study, 31 cats were evaluated to assess if the barrier gel dental product was effective in cats. Following an enrollment-qualification assessment and enrollment of each cat, all cats received a professional dental cleaning, including polishing and irrigation. Following cleaning, a post-cleaning assessment was performed by the evaluator. Then, using a pre-developed randomization schedule, cats were assigned to the treated or control group. The professional version of the barrier gel was applied to the treated group on day 0. The negative-control group patients did not receive any applications of the barrier gel following dental cleaning. Treated-group cats were brought back to the clinic for subsequent applications of the home-care version of the barrier gel, applied by a non-blinded trained assistant. The home-care version product applications began on day 14 and then were applied weekly (days, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49 and 56) through day 56. All cats enrolled in the study underwent full oral examinations and assessments by the blinded evaluator on or about their respective days 28 and 56. At these evaluations, the evaluator performed standardized assessments for plaque, calculus, gingivitis, and gingival bleeding. Numeric scores were assigned for each assessment using predetermined target teeth to ensure consistency. Using these assessment scores, statistical analyses were performed to determine the efficacies against plaque and calculus deposition; additionally, measurements of gingivitis and gingival bleeding were assessed. Change in plaque score from baseline, for all teeth assessed (all 4 canine teeth, and all 4 [corrected] premolar teeth), was significantly (P < 0.05) lower for treated cats than for control cats for both left side average and right side average on day 56. No statistical differences were seen for calculus, gingivitis, or gingival bleeding in this study. In cats with a history of developing plaque, application of the barrier gel dental product following dental cleaning reduced plaque deposition (P < 0.05) compared with control cats.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/089875641202900204DOI Listing
October 2012

Should veterinary technicians be allowed to perform dental extractions?

Authors:
Jan Bellows

J Vet Dent 2012 ;29(1):6-7

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2012

Additional information on dental chew treats.

Authors:
Jan Bellows

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2008 Jun;232(12):1797

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2008

AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2005 Sep-Oct;41(5):277-83

Animal Dental Clinic, San Carlos, California 94070, USA.

The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and quality of life. Diseases of the oral cavity, if left untreated, are often painful and can contribute to other local or systemic diseases. This paper includes guidelines for materials and equipment, dental cleaning and evaluation, client communication, and pet home care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5326/0410277DOI Listing
August 2007

Laser use in veterinary dentistry.

Authors:
Jan Bellows

Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2002 May;32(3):673-92, viii

Hometown Animal Hospital and Dental Clinic, Weston, FL 33326, USA.

Lasers have been used in human dentistry since the 1960's. Lasers can provide a veterinary dentist access to difficult to reach areas with a relatively bloodless surgical field. Due to vaporization of nerve endings, human patients undergoing laser dental treatment reveal less pain compared to scalpel driven procedures. Dental applications for the commonly used lasers are discussed, as are special safety precautions. Many dental procedures enhanced by a carbon dioxide laser are covered. Future applications for the laser in veterinary dentistry are also discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0195-5616(02)00010-4DOI Listing
May 2002
-->