Publications by authors named "Jamie E Phillips"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assay Integrity of a PCR Influenza Point-of-Care Test Remains Following Artificial System Contamination.

J Appl Lab Med 2019 11 1;4(3):422-426. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Roche Diagnostics Corporation, Indianapolis, IN.

Background: Healthcare providers who have access to tests at the point of care (POC) are increasingly requesting the same performance from the POC test as they expect from the laboratory. With the introduction of the cobas Liat instrument, highly sensitive molecular diagnostic testing can be performed closer to the patient in CLIA-waived, POC settings. As more sensitive tests become available, there is concern regarding contamination of instrumentation owing to improper handling, mistakes made when processing, or environmental contamination. Recent concerns were raised when a nurse performed environmental surveillance for flu A/B by inserting a dry swab into the cobas Liat instrument and then ran it as a sample on the instrument, generating a positive result. This finding stimulated questions about the possibility of system contamination contributing to false-positive results, ultimately leading to the possibility of providing incorrect treatment to patients.

Methods: To assess the likelihood of system contamination contributing to the generation of false-positive results, in this study we contaminated a cobas Liat System with flu A/B-positive control material. The system contamination was then assessed by swabbing exposed surfaces. Following confirmed system contamination, negative control samples were processed to determine whether system contamination had an impact on the expected negative results.

Results: Instrument contamination was confirmed, and no detectable flu A/B signal was observed for any of the negative control tubes run immediately following confirmation of system contamination.

Conclusion: Environmental contamination of the Liat instrument does not have an impact on the integrity of the result.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/jalm.2018.028639DOI Listing
November 2019

GENETIC RELATEDNESS OF EPIZOOTIC HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE VIRUS SEROTYPE 2 FROM 2012 OUTBREAK IN THE USA.

J Wildl Dis 2019 04 4;55(2):363-374. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

1 Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, 589 D. W. Brooks Dr., Athens, Georgia 30602, USA.

During summer and early fall of 2012, the US experienced the largest outbreak of hemorrhagic disease (HD) on record; deer (both Odocoileus virginianus and Odocoileus hemionus) in 35 states were affected, including many northern states where HD typically does not occur. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) was the predominant virus isolated, with serotype 2 (EHDV-2) representing 66% (135/205) of all isolated viruses. Viruses within the EHDV serogroup are genetically similar, but we hypothesized that subtle genetic distinctions between viruses would exist across the geographic range of the outbreak if multiple EHDV-2 strains were responsible. We examined viral relatedness and molecular epidemiology of the outbreak by sequencing the mammalian binding protein (VP2) gene and the insect vector binding protein (VP7) gene of 34 EHDV-2 isolates from 2012 across 21 states. Nucleotide sequences of VP2 had 99.0% pairwise identity; VP7 nucleotide sequences had 99.1% pairwise identity. Very few changes were observed in either protein at the amino acid level. Despite the high genetic similarity between isolates, subtle nucleotide differences existed. Both VP2 and VP7 gene sequences separated into two distinct clades based on patterns of single-nucleotide polymorphisms after phylogenetic analysis. The clades were divided geographically into eastern and western clades, although those divisions were not identical between VP2 and VP7. There was also an association between percent sequence identity and geographic distance between isolates. We concluded that multiple EHDV-2 strains contributed to this outbreak.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/2017-05-125DOI Listing
April 2019

The First 10 Years (2006-15) of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 6 in the USA.

J Wildl Dis 2017 10 28;53(4):901-905. Epub 2017 Jun 28.

1 Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, 589 D. W. Brooks Dr., Athens, Georgia 30602, USA.

Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is a Culicoides biting midge-transmitted orbivirus (family Reoviridae) of wild and domestic ruminants and is an important pathogen of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Historically, only two serotypes, EHDV-1 and EHDV-2, have been known to be endemic in the US. However, in 2006, an exotic serotype (EHDV-6) was first detected in the US by a long-term passive surveillance system for EHDV and bluetongue viruses. Here we report EHDV-6 detections made through these passive surveillance efforts by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study (University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA) and the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (US Department of Agriculture, Ames, Iowa, USA) over a 10-yr period (2006-15). The results demonstrated that EHDV-6 was detected from ruminants every year since 2006 and was widespread in the central and eastern US, providing evidence that EHDV-6 is likely now established in the US.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/2016-12-284DOI Listing
October 2017

Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States.

PLoS One 2015 21;10(4):e0122644. Epub 2015 Apr 21.

Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Department of Population Health, 589 D.W. Brooks Drive, Wildlife Health Building, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America.

Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122644PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4405500PMC
April 2016

Apparent increase of reported hemorrhagic disease in the midwestern and northeastern USA.

J Wildl Dis 2015 Apr 14;51(2):348-61. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

1  Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, 589 D. W. Brooks Drive, Wildlife Health Building, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-4393, USA.

We investigated temporal and spatial trends in reporting of hemorrhagic disease (HD) in the midwestern and northeastern US using a 33-yr (1980-2012) questionnaire-based data set. This data set was supported by an additional 19 yr (1994-2012) of bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) isolation results from clinically affected white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in these regions. Both the number of counties that were reported positive for HD and the northern latitudinal range of reported HD increased with time. A similar increase was observed with both the number of states annually reporting HD and the number of counties where HD was reported. Large-scale outbreaks occurred in 1988, 1996, 2007, and 2012, and the scale of these individual outbreaks also increased with time. The predominant virus isolated from these regions was EHDV-2, but the prevalence of EHDV-6, which was first detected in 2006, appears to be increasing. Temporally, the extent of regional HD reporting was correlated with regional drought conditions. The significance of increases in reported HD and the incursions and establishment of new BTV and EHDV in the US currently are unknown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/2013-12-330DOI Listing
April 2015