W. James Chon

Dr. W. James Chon

MD, FACP, FASN, FAST, FNKF

University of Missouri-Kansas City

Associate Professor, Medicine (Nephrology)

Kansas City, MO | United States

Specialties: Nephrology

W. James Chon

Dr. W. James Chon

MD, FACP, FASN, FAST, FNKF
Introduction

Dr. Chon is an associate professor of medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and serves as the Medical Director of the Renal Transplant Program at Saint Luke's Health System. He is an experienced transplant nephrologist and is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology. His research interests include ethics in transplantation, BK virus nephropathy, and vaccinations in transplant patients. He has served as Chairman for the American Society of Transplanation (AST) Trainee and Young Faculty Community of Practice.

Primary Affiliation: University of Missouri-Kansas City - Kansas City, MO , United States

Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. W. James Chon’s Resume / CV
Metrics

28

Publications

663

Profile Views

73

Reads

75

PubMed Central Citations

Education
Jun 2012
University of Chicago
Fellowship
Jun 2003
Harvard Medical School/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Fellowship
Jun 2002
Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital
Fellowship
Jun 1999
University of Rochester
Residency
May 1996
New York University School of Medicine
M.D.
May 1992
Cornell University
B.A.
Experience
Mar 2018
Top Doctors
Mar 2017
Top Doctors
Mar 2016
Top Doctors
May 2015
Fellow of the American Society of Transplantation
Mar 2015
Top Doctors
Mar 2014
Top Doctors
Mar 2005
Fellow of the American College of Physicians
Mar 2004
Fellow of the American Society of Nephrology
Top co-authors
Michelle A Josephson
Michelle A Josephson

University of Chicago

10
Anthony Chang
Anthony Chang

University of Chicago

5
Shane M Meehan
Shane M Meehan

University of Chicago

3
Pradeep V Kadambi
Pradeep V Kadambi

University of Arizona

3
Yolanda T Becker
Yolanda T Becker

University of Wisconsin

2
Christopher S Lee
Christopher S Lee

School of Nursing

2
Mark B Lockwood
Mark B Lockwood

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing

2
Roger Sciammas
Roger Sciammas

University of Chicago

2
Milda R Saunders
Milda R Saunders

Section of Hospital Medicine

2
Anita S Chong
Anita S Chong

The University of Chicago

2

Publications

28Publications

73Reads

75PubMed Central Citations

Bowman capsulitis predicts poor kidney allograft outcome in T cell-mediated rejection.

Hum Pathol 2018 Jun 6;76:47-51. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

Department of Pathology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

View Article
June 2018
2 Reads
2.77 Impact Factor

Patient-Reported Barriers to the Prekidney Transplant Evaluation in an At-Risk Population in the United States.

Prog Transplant 2017 Jun 27;27(2):131-138. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

6 Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing.

View Article
June 2017
7 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
0.69 Impact Factor

Renal allograft granulomatous interstitial nephritis: observations of an uncommon injury pattern in 22 transplant recipients.

Clin Kidney J 2017 04 1;10(2):240-248. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA; Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA.

View Article
April 2017
3 Reads

Miscommunicating NOTA Can Be Costly to Living Donors.

Am J Transplant 2017 Feb 3;17(2):578-580. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.

View Article
February 2017
3 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
5.68 Impact Factor

Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation: Post-operative care of renal transplant recipient

ISBN 978-1-4939-6377-5

Anesthesia and Perioperative Care for Organ Transplantation (Springer)

View Article
October 2016
3 Reads

Outcomes of Pancreatic Islet Allotransplantation Using the Edmonton Protocol at the University of Chicago

2: e105; doi: 10.1097/TXD.0000000000000609

Transplantation Direct

Objective. The aim of this study was to assess short-term and long-term results of the pancreatic islet transplantation using the Edmonton protocol at the University of Chicago. Materials and Methods. Nine patients underwent pancreatic islet cell trans- plantation using the Edmonton Protocol; they were followed up for 10 years after initial islet transplant with up to 3 separate islet infusions. They were given induction treatment using an IL-2R antibody and their maintenance immunosuppression regimen consisted of sirolimus and tacrolimus. Results. Nine patients received a total of 18 islet infusions. Five patients dropped out in the early phase of the study. Greater than 50% drop-out and noncompliance rate resulted from both poor islet function and recur- rent side effects of immunosuppression. The remaining 4 (44%) patients stayed insulin free with intervals for at least over 5 years (cumulative time) after the first transplant. Each of them received 3 infusions, on average 445 000 islet equivalent per transplant. Immunosuppression regimen required multiple adjustments in all patients due to recurrent side effects. In the long-term follow up, kidney function remained stable, and diabetic retinopathy and polyneuropathy did not progress in any of the patients. Patients' panel reactive antibodies remained zero and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibody did not rise after the transplant. Results of metabolic tests including hemoglobin A1c, arginine stimulation, and mixed meal tolerance test were correlated with clinical islet function. Conclusions. Pancreatic islet transplantation initiated according to Edmonton protocol offered durable long-term insulin-free glycemic control in only highly selected brittle diabetics providing stable control of diabetic neuropathy and retinopathy and without increased sensitization or impaired renal function. Immunosuppression adjustments and close follow-up were critical for patient retention and ultimate success.

View Article
September 2016
3 Reads

High-level viruria as a screening tool for BK virus nephropathy in renal transplant recipients

Kidney Res Clin Pract. 2016 Sep; 35(3): 176–181

Kidney Research and Clinical Practice

Background: Although early monitoring of BK virus infection in renal transplant patients has led to improved outcomes over the past decade, it remains unclear whether monitoring for viremia is the best screening tool for BK virus nephropathy (BKVN). Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 368 renal transplant recipients who had a minimum of 18 months of posttransplantation follow-up. The relationship between the presence of BK viruria and a composite end point of BK viremia/BKVN was established, and the predictive value of high-grade BK viruria for development of viremia/BKVN was determined. Results: High grade of BK viruria was present in 110 (30.1%) of the renal transplant recipients. BK viremia/BKVN was present in 64 (17.4%) patients and was 50 times more likely to be present in patients with high-grade BK viruria. The risk of developing BK viremia/BKVN was 3 times higher in high-grade viruria patients, and viruria preceded viremia by nearly 7 weeks. Conclusion: The presence of high-grade viruria is an early marker for developing BK viremia/BKVN. Detection of high-grade viruria should prompt early allograft biopsy and/or preemptive reduction in immunosuppression.

View Article
September 2016
3 Reads

Midodrine Dependence: Transplantation Barrier or Opportunity?

Transplantation 2016 05;100(5):977-8

1 Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

View Article
May 2016
2 Reads
3.83 Impact Factor

Impact of maintenance steroids versus rapid steroid withdrawal in African-American kidney transplant recipients: comparison of two urban centers

Int J Clin Med, 2016; 7 (3):204-216

International Journal of Clinical Medicine

Background: Rapid steroid withdrawal (RSW) is used increasingly in kidney transplantation but long-term outcomes in African-American (AA) recipients are not well known. We compared 1 and 5 year transplant outcomes in a large cohort of AA patients who were maintained on continued steroid therapy (CST) to those who underwent RSW. Methods: Post-transplant courses of A as receiving kidney allografts from 2003-2011 at two urban transplant centers in Chicago were followed. Prior to outcome analysis, we used Inverse Probability of Treatment Weights (IPTW) to match the two groups on a set of baseline risk factors. Graft and patient survival, GFR at 1 and 5 years, incidence and type of rejection, incidence of post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), delayed graft function, CMV and BK viremia were compared. Results: There were 150 AA recipients in the CST analytic group and 157 in the RSW analytic group. Graft and patient survival was similar between the two groups. Rates of CMV viremia were higher in the RSW compared to the CST analytic group at 1 year. Biopsy-proven acute rejection and PTDM were similar between the RSW and CST groups. Conclusions: In AA recipients, RSW has similar long-term outcomes to CST.

View Article
March 2016
2 Reads

Clinical and pathological features of kidney transplant patients with concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy and rejection-associated endarteritis.

World J Transplant 2015 Dec;5(4):292-9

Stephanie M McGregor, Anthony Chang, Department of Pathology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL 60637, United States.

View Article
December 2015
6 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)

Differing tales of two patients after receiving a kidney transplant from a donor with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

Case Rep Transplant 2014 30;2014:754256. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 5100, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

View Article
July 2014
3 Reads

Impact of immunosuppression on recall immune responses to influenza vaccination in stable renal transplant recipients.

Transplantation 2014 Apr;97(8):846-53

1 Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 2 Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 3 Department of Pathology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 4 Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. 5 Atlanta Research and Education Foundation, Atlanta, GA. 6 Address correspondence to: Anita S. Chong, Ph.D., The University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637.

View Article
April 2014
4 Reads
3 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.83 Impact Factor

Kidney transplant and the digital divide: is information and communication technology a barrier or a bridge to transplant for African Americans?

Prog Transplant 2013 Dec;23(4):302-9

Oregon Health and Science, University School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon.

View Article
December 2013
4 Reads
4 PubMed Central Citations(source)
0.69 Impact Factor

Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

In: UpToDate, Rose, BD (Ed)

UpToDate

Updated Annually

View Article
June 2013
2 Reads

Opportunities for shared decision making in kidney transplantation

Am J Transplant, 2013 May; 13: 1149-1158

Am J Transplant

Health researchers and policy-makers increasingly urge both patient and clinician engagement in shared decision making (SDM) to promote patient-centered care. Although SDM has been examined in numerous clinical settings, it has received little attention in solid organ transplantation. This paper describes the application of SDM to the kidney transplantation context. Several distinctive features of kidney transplantation present challenges to SDM including fragmented patient-provider relationships, the time-sensitive and unpredictable nature of deceased organ offers, decision-making processes by transplant providers serving as both organ guardians (given the organ scarcity) versus advocates for specific patients seeking transplantation, variable clinical practices and policies among transplant centers, and patients' potentially compromised cognitive status and literacy levels. We describe potential barriers to and opportunities for SDM, and posit that SDM is feasible, warranting encouragement in kidney transplantation. We propose strategies to promote and overcome obstacles to SDM in kidney transplantation. We contend that engagement in SDM can be facilitated by re-organization of clinical care, communication and education of providers and patients.

View Article
May 2013
2 Reads

Plasma cell densities and glomerular filtration rates predict renal allograft outcomes following acute rejection.

Transpl Int 2012 Oct 17;25(10):1050-8. Epub 2012 Jul 17.

Departments of Pathology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

View Article
October 2012
3 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
2.60 Impact Factor

Reuse of a previously transplanted kidney: does success come with a price?

Clin Kidney J. 2012 Oct; 5(5):434-437

Clinical Kidney Journal

Longer wait times for deceased donor kidney transplant have prompted newer initiatives to expedite the process. Reuse of a previously transplanted kidney might be appropriate in certain circumstances. However, one must also consider the unique issues that may arise after such transplants. We describe our experience in one such case where the donor kidney had lesions of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and signs of alloreactivity (positive C4d staining) prior to transplantation and the recipient developed ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, which was perhaps transmitted from the donor. Despite the challenges, the allograft function remained stable 5 years after reuse.

View Article
October 2012
2 Reads

Leflunomide in renal transplantation.

Expert Rev Clin Immunol 2011 May;7(3):273-81

Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5100, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

View Article
May 2011
3 Reads
5 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.34 Impact Factor

Changing attitudes toward influenza vaccination in U.S. Kidney transplant programs over the past decade.

Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2010 Sep 1;5(9):1637-41. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

View Article
September 2010
4 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
4.61 Impact Factor

Smoking-does it "burn" the kidney transplant?

Am J Kidney Dis 2010 May;55(5):817-9

View Article
May 2010
2 Reads
5.90 Impact Factor

On the intraoperative molecular status of renal allografts after vascular reperfusion and clinical outcomes.

J Am Soc Nephrol 2005 Jun 11;16(6):1542-8. Epub 2005 May 11.

Department of Medicine Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA.

View Article
June 2005
5 Reads
9 PubMed Central Citations(source)
9.34 Impact Factor

Rapamycin is an effective inhibitor of human renal cancer metastasis.

Kidney Int 2003 Mar;63(3):917-26

Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York-Presbyterian Hospital New York, New York, USA.

View Article
March 2003
3 Reads
41 PubMed Central Citations(source)
8.56 Impact Factor
Top co-authors
Michelle A Josephson
Michelle A Josephson

University of Chicago

10
Anthony Chang
Anthony Chang

University of Chicago

5
Shane M Meehan
Shane M Meehan

University of Chicago

3
Pradeep V Kadambi
Pradeep V Kadambi

University of Arizona

3
Yolanda T Becker
Yolanda T Becker

University of Wisconsin

2
Christopher S Lee
Christopher S Lee

School of Nursing

2
Mark B Lockwood
Mark B Lockwood

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing

2
Roger Sciammas
Roger Sciammas

University of Chicago

2
Milda R Saunders
Milda R Saunders

Section of Hospital Medicine

2
Anita S Chong
Anita S Chong

The University of Chicago

2