Mr James Osei-Yeboah, .MPhil - University of Health and Allied Sciences - Lecturer

Mr James Osei-Yeboah

.MPhil

University of Health and Allied Sciences

Lecturer

Ho, Volta | Ghana

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7982-5707

Mr James Osei-Yeboah, .MPhil - University of Health and Allied Sciences - Lecturer

Mr James Osei-Yeboah

.MPhil

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Health and Allied Sciences - Ho, Volta , Ghana

Education

Aug 2006 - Nov 2010
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
Mphil
Molecular Medicine

Experience

Aug 2014
University of Health and Allied Sciences
Lecturer
Medical Laboratory Sciences

Publications

21Publications

366Reads

5Profile Views

24PubMed Central Citations

Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Healthcare Workers: A Cross-Sectional Study at the Sefwi-Wiawso Municipal Hospital, Ghana.

Biomed Res Int 2018 23;2018:8904548. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/8904548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5937588PMC
October 2018
26 Reads

Determinants of Crystalluria among Type 2 Diabetes Patients; A Case-Control Study of the Agona West Municipality, Ghana.

Niger Med J 2017 May-Jun;58(3):114-118

Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/nmj.NMJ_121_16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6009140PMC
July 2018
15 Reads

Comparative Performance Evaluation of Routine Malaria Diagnosis at Ho Municipal Hospital.

J Parasitol Res 2016 25;2016:5837890. Epub 2016 Sep 25.

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5837890DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5055952PMC
September 2016
15 Reads
1 Citation

An Analysis of Anthropometric Indicators and Modifiable Lifestyle Parameters Associated with Hypertensive Nephropathy.

Int J Hypertens 2016 27;2016:6598921. Epub 2016 Sep 27.

Department of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6598921DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5059654PMC
September 2016
39 Reads
1 Citation

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among HIV-infected patients in Ghana: A cross-sectional study.

Niger Med J 2016 Mar-Apr;57(2):86-90

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0300-1652.182082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4872497PMC
May 2016
60 Reads
2 Citations

Anaemia and Iron Homeostasis in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in Ghana.

AIDS Res Treat 2016 22;2016:1623094. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1623094DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820609PMC
April 2016
11 Reads
3 Citations

An Assessment of Female Prisoners’ Perception of the Accessibility of Quality Healthcare: A Survey in the Kumasi Central Prisons, Ghana

Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research 2015 May 5,3

Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research

Accessibility of quality healthcare across the globe has generated a lot of attention among public health practitioners. This study explored the background characteristics of female prisoners and how it influences their assessment of the quality of accessible healthcare in the Kumasi Female Prison. This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted at the Female section of the Kumasi Central Prisons from June to December 2011. We used pretested questionnaires to obtain quantitative data from all 39 inmates of the female Prisons. An in-depth interview was used to obtain qualitative data from the prison healthcare giver. Data were analyzed with Epi Info Version 3.5.1, (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Excel, and Graph Pad Prism version 5.00 for Windows (Graph Pad software, San Diego California USA, www.graphpad.com). Using a 12-point scale inventory questionnaire, inmates with no formal education gave the highest mean health provision assessment score (6.0) whereas those with tertiary education gave the lowest (4.5). Females serving prison sentences gave the highest mean health assessment score whereas remand prisoners gave the lowest. Single females' mean health assessment score was 5.7 whereas that of married inmates was 4.9. Unemployed inmates scored 5.8, informal 5.4 while civil servants scored 5.0. Access to quality healthcare was poor and demographic characteristics, marital status, educational background, and occupation influenced inmates' perceptions of accessibility to quality healthcare. Inmates should be encouraged to be proactive in seeking healthcare irrespective of their background characteristics.

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May 2015
4 Reads

The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its predominant components among pre-and postmenopausal Ghanaian women.

BMC Res Notes 2013 Nov 8;6:446. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1756-0500-6-446DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843598PMC
November 2013
9 Reads
10 Citations

See all › Add supplementary resources Download Share Asymptomatic bacteriuria among type 2 diabetics in the Sekondi-Takoradi Metropolis, South-West Ghana

J.Med.Sci, 13(4):290-295,2013

Journal of Medical Sciences

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with several overt and covert complications. The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria (ASB), Antimicrobial Sensitivity pattern of the bacterial isolates and associated confounding factors leading to ASB in tire Sekondi-takoradi metropolis. A cross-sectional, non-probability sampling technique was used to recruit 102 confirmed Type 2 diabetes mellitus and 23 healthy controls. Fasting blood samples were collected from both study and control participants for blood sugar analysis, midstream urine for microscopy, culture and Antibiotic Sensitivity Testing (AST). Total prevalence of ASB in this study was 26.4 with 41.9% of the total prevalence found in participants with 6-10 years of diabetic history yielding a comparative significant difference in ASB in patients with longer diabetic duration. E. coli was the most prevalent bacterial isolate (15.6%) and the most resistant (62.5-100%). Tetracycline and cotrimoxazole were the least effective drugs (0%) whilst nitrofurantoin, nalidixic and gentamicin were more effective. The peak incidence of ASB in T2DM occurs within age group 50-59 years and more frequently in female diabetics. T2DM patients significantly have abnormal Body Mass Index (BMI) (p = 0.0022). Age, sex and BMI predispose T2DM patients to prevalence of ASB with highly resistant isolates in the Sekondi-Takoradi metropolis. These must be factored in the treatment of T2DM complications.

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May 2013
22 Reads

Prediction of metabolic syndrome among postmenopausal Ghanaian women using obesity and atherogenic markers.

Lipids Health Dis 2012 Aug 10;11:101. Epub 2012 Aug 10.

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-11-101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3479426PMC
August 2012
25 Reads
7 Citations
2.220 Impact Factor

Residual Risk of Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus through Blood Transfusion in Ghana: Evaluation of the performance of Rapid Immunochromatographic Assay with Enzyme Linked Immuno- sorbent Assay

Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences (2012) 1(2): 17 - 28

Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences

Blood transfusion necessitates screening of transmissible infectious pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) to curtail post transfusion risk of infection. The study re-examined this approach by evaluating the efficiency of solely testing for hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) marker for blood transfusion, the efficacy of the various immunochromatographic assays in the screening process and the residual risk of hepatitis B viral transmission through transfusion in Ghana. A convenient purposive sampling technique was used in selecting ten hospitals, from each of the 10 regions. A total of 480 aliquots of blood were collected anonymously, from blood already tested for HbsAg with immunochromatographic assay in the blood banks of the chosen facilities and declared nega-tive. Plasma from the blood was obtained through centrifugation, separated into well labeled micro-tubes and transported in cold boxes to the Molecular Medicine Department-KNUST. The samples were then re-examined for all six hepatitis B virus (HBV) (HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HBe, anti-HBc and IgM anti-HBc) serological markers using ELISA assay. When a total of 480 plasma samples from the blood banks of the ten chosen facilities were re-examined with the ELISA assay, 39(8.13%) samples reacted positive for HBsAg, 60(12.5%) reacted for Anti-HBs, 13(2.71%) reacted for HBeAg, 51(10.63%) for Anti-HBe and 329(68.54%) reacted positively for Anti-HBc. None of the samples reacted positive for IgM anti-HBc. The estimated sero-prevalence for all HBV serological markers is 76.67% whereas the estimated residual risk of HBV infection through blood transfusion caused by the use of immunochromatographic methods in the screening of blood for transfusion was 8.47%(5.98% -10.94% at 95% CI). An additional risk of 3.10%(1.54% -4.62% at 95% CI) of HBV infection through transfusion was also estimated for the non-testing of other HBV infectious sero-logical markers. The total residual risk for transfusion transmitted HBV was 11.16%(8.34% -13.95% at 95% CI). The study revealed that neither the kits in use nor the testing strategy in place now is adequate to prevent transmission of hepatitis B virus through transfusion in Ghana due to the high residual risk of transmission of HBV. There is therefore an urgent need for a sustainable quality control system on the screening of HBsAg in blood for donation in Ghana. Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences (2012) 1(2), 17-28

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April 2012
8 Reads

Method validation and proficiency testing of liver function test at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital

Ghana Journal of Allied Health Sciences

Background: Understanding by laboratories worldwide of the importance of reliable serum bilirubin, AST and ALT measurements in liver function estimation and of factors that may affect these parameters is critical to ongoing global public health efforts to enhance the diagnosis and treatment of patients with liver problems. Objective:This study aim at estimating how well the values generated by the ATAC 8000 autoanalyzer used at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) agrees with manual methods for liver function test. Methods: The study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) were used for a 20 day replication study (bilirubin, AST and ALT), commercially prepared standard of total bilirubin (TBIL) and direct bilirubin (DBIL) and 50 patients samples were run using the autoanalyzer and manual methods. In the phase section, commercially prepared lyophilized serum (TruCal U, DuaSys) was used for the 20 day replication study and 100 patient's samples were assayed for only bilirubin using the ATAC autoanalyzer and manual methods. Results: High degrees of variations were observed in all fractions of bilirubin and enzymes estimated with the Autoanalyzer in both control sera and patient's sera. The autoanalyzer consistently generated results that were higher than that of the WHO reference methods and the commercially prepared standards values. The precision and accuracy of the ATAC 8000 autoanalyzer was generally poor, but improved slightly when it was compared with the Malloy and Evelyn procedure for direct bilirubin in the second section of the study. Conclusion: Values for bilirubin and enzymes obtained by the ATAC 8000 automated method are inaccurate and unreliable.The automated values were consistently too high and deviated strongly from theoretical values and WHO reference manual methods.

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April 2007
9 Reads

Top co-authors

Sylvester Yao Lokpo
Sylvester Yao Lokpo

University of Health and Allied Sciences

7
Gameli Kwame Norgbe
Gameli Kwame Norgbe

School of Allied Health Sciences

4
Emmanuel Alote Allotey
Emmanuel Alote Allotey

School of Allied Health Sciences

3
Tibemponi Ntoni
Tibemponi Ntoni

School of Allied Health Sciences

3
Christian Obirikorang
Christian Obirikorang

School of Medical Sciences

3
Francis Abeku Ussher
Francis Abeku Ussher

Koforidua Technical University

3