Dr. James C.L. Mwansa, PhD - Lusaks Apex Medical University - Head of Department of Medical Microbiology.Senior Lecturer and Consultant Medical Microbiologist

Dr. James C.L. Mwansa

PhD

Lusaks Apex Medical University

Head of Department of Medical Microbiology.Senior Lecturer and Consultant Medical Microbiologist

Lusaka, Lusaka | Zambia

Main Specialties: Medical Microbiology

Additional Specialties: Diagnostic Medical Microbiology, Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, International Health Regulations, Integrated Disease Surveillance, Infection control, Antimicrobial Resistance


Top Author

Dr. James C.L. Mwansa, PhD - Lusaks Apex Medical University - Head of Department of Medical Microbiology.Senior Lecturer and Consultant Medical Microbiologist

Dr. James C.L. Mwansa

PhD

Introduction

• CURRENT POSITION: Consultant Medical Microbiologist, and Honorary Lecturer University Teaching Hospital and University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia

• Dr. James Mwansa PhD in Medical Microbiology (Manchester UK 1986), a long-time consultant Medical microbiologist,
• 1986-1989 Head of Laboratory Services at Tropical Diseases Research Centre, Ndola, Zambia.


• 1995-2009 Dr. Mwansa was the Head of the Zambia Country’s National Referal and reference Microbiology Laboratory at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka and advisor to the Government of Zambia

• 1995-2009 Has been a consultant at UTH in clinical diagnosis and management of opportunistic (HIV) infections and Chairman of Hospital Infection control committee.

• Honorary lecturer, research supervisor and Examiner and External Examiner for undergraduate, and post graduate Biomedical Science and Medical students, Doctors and researcher within the School of Medicine and the University teaching hospital, Zambia 1991-to date.

• Since 1995 Member of the National Epidemic Prevention and Control Committee- Zambia

• 2014 WHO consultant on enhancing NTD Laboratory support in the WHO African Region

• Since 1987- Has been consultant to the Ministry of Heath with vast experience in investigation , identification, and emergency response of epidemic infectious diseases (Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response- IDSR)

• Leading field teams in investigating outbreaks of Plague , Diarrhoeal disease ( cholera, typhoid, dysentery) , epidemic meningitis, and Anthrax in various parts of Zambia country .
• Trainer of Trainers in Intergrated Diseases Surveillance and Response in Zambia
• 2009 trained consultant on International Health Regulations (IHR) core Capacity Country Assessment.
• Has been a WHO Temporary advisor to assess Core capacities for IHR in Eritrea, Zimbabwe, Kenya,and Zambia

• 1989 to date Dr. Mwansa has worked on Neglected Tropical diseases and was Chairman instrumental in introducing the NTD control programme in Zambia in particular Mass drug administration (MDA) for Schistosomiasis and Soil transmitted helminths in conjunction with School Health and Nutrition Programme
• Since 2010 Dr. Mwansa has been a WHO Temporal advisor for developing Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) National Master Plans and Mapping of NTDs for Kenya, Malawi, Zimbabwe, and Zambia.

• 1996 to date working closely in collaboration with the School of Verterinary Medicine to define the epidemiology and biology of the epidemic infectious and zoonotic disease.

• 2010-2014 Dr. Mwansa Co investigator for an International Multi-Centre Prospective Project in the School of Medicine, in conjunction with Boston’s University’s Centre for Infectious Diseases and International Health in Zambia (CIDHZ). The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) Project is a rigorous International Multi-Centre Prospective Project case control study of hospitalized paediatric patients with severe lower respiratory illnesses to determine the etiology and risk factors associated with the syndrome.

• 2014 to date,Member of WHO (AFRO) Regional Programme Review Group for NTD

Senior Lecturer and Head of Department of Microbiology Lusaka Apex Medical University,Zambia since August 2016.

I have been a consultant Medical Microbiologist in clinical diagnosis and management of opportunistic (HIV) infections and Hospital Infection control specialist at UTH with special interest in Antimicrobial Resistance. He was the Head of the Country’s National Referral Microbiology Laboratory from 1990 – 2009 and advisor to the Government of Zambia and has vast experience in investigation, identification, and emergency response to epidemic infectious diseases. In 2009 was trained as a WHO consultant on International Health Regulations (IHR) Capacity Country Assessment and has been a WHO advisor to develop Core capacities for IHR in Eritrea, and Zambia. WHO Afro Regional Programme Review Group (RPRG) member for Neglected tropical Diseases (NTD) 2014 to present. I have been a WHO Temporary Advisor for Control of Neglected Tropical and Zoonotic Diseases including bilharzias, soil transmitted helminthes, filariasis, human African trypanosomiasis, trachoma, cystercercosis, plague, and anthrax. From 2010 to 2013 was a WHO consultant for developing Neglected Tropical Disease National Master Plans for Kenya, Malawi, Zimbabwe, and Zambia. Presently a co-investigator on two projects focused on pneumonia etiologies in pediatric patients and Sepsis in neonates and a consultant for UTH on a WHO surveillance project. Presently serving as a Mentor for PhD and MSc students.



Primary Affiliation: Lusaks Apex Medical University - Lusaka, Lusaka , Zambia

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. James C.L. Mwansa’s Resume / CV

Education

Feb 1987
WHO/GENEVA
Certificate in Immunology and Biotechnology of Infectious Diseases
Feb 1987
WHO/GENEVA
Certificate in Immunology and Biotechnology of Infectious Diseases
Feb 1987
WHO/GENEVA
Certificate in Immunology and Biotechnology of Infectious Diseases
Feb 1987
WHO/GENEVA
Certificate in Immunology and Biotechnology of Infectious Diseases
Sep 1986
Manchester University UK
PhD. Medical Microbiology
Jan 1976
University of Zambia
BSc.Human Biology

Experience

Aug 2016
•Head of Department of Medical Microbiology and Senior Lecturer
•Head of Department of Medical Microbiology and Senior Lecturer
Feb 2015
Member
WHO AFRO NTD Regional Programme Review Group
Aug 2013
PERCH study (a multi-country study of the etiology of severe pneumonia in children).
Laboratory Head
Oct 1990
•Medical Microbiologist and Head of Laboratories (1987- 1989) - Tropical Diseases Research Centre, Ndola, Zambia
•Medical Microbiologist and Head of Laboratories (1987- 1989) - Tropical Diseases Research Centre, Ndola, Zambia
Aug 1990
•Consultant Medical Microbiologist
•Consultant Medical Microbiologist (1990 –2016) University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia
Feb 1990
•Honorary Lecturer , Medical Microbiology
•Honorary Lecturer (1990 –2013) University of Zambia, School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia
Oct 1980
•Elective (1980-1981) - Warwick Pathology Laboratory-UK Medical Microbiology
•Elective (1980-1981) - Warwick Pathology Laboratory-UK Medical Microbiology
Oct 1978
•Laboratory scientist (1978-1980) - University Teaching Hospital and Chest Diseases Laboratory.
•Laboratory scientist (1978-1980) - University Teaching Hospital and Chest Diseases Laboratory.

Publications

18Publications

518Reads

2Profile Views

Preventing Bloodstream Infections and Death in Zambian Neonates: Impact of a Low-cost Infection Control Bundle.

2018 Dec 28. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy1114.

Clin. Infect Dis

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality in low-resource settings. As facility-based births become more common, the proportion of neonatal deaths due to hospital-onset sepsis has increased.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective cohort study in a neonatal intensive care unit in Zambia where we implemented a multi-faceted infection prevention and control (IPC) bundle consisting of IPC training, text message reminders, alcohol hand rub, enhanced environmental cleaning, and weekly bathing of babies ≥1.5 kg with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate. Hospital-associated sepsis, bloodstream infection (BSI), and mortality (>3 days after admission) outcome data were collected for 6 months prior to and 11 months after bundle implementation.

RESULTS:

Most enrolled neonates had a birthweight ≥1.5 kg (2131/2669, 79.8%). Hospital-associated mortality was lower during the intervention than baseline period (18.0% vs 23.6%). Total mortality was lower in the intervention than prior periods. Half of enrolled neonates (50.4%) had suspected sepsis; 40.8% of cultures were positive. Most positive blood cultures yielded a pathogen (409/549, 74.5%), predominantly Klebsiella pneumoniae (289/409, 70.1%). The monthly rate and incidence density rate of suspected sepsis were lower in the intervention period for all birthweight categories, except babies weighing <1.0 kg. The rate of BSI with pathogen was also lower in the intervention than baseline period.

CONCLUSIONS:

A simple IPC bundle can reduce sepsis and death in neonates hospitalized in high-risk, low-resource settings. Further research is needed to validate these findings in similar settings and to identify optimal implementation strategies for improvement and sustainability. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT02386592.

PMID:
 
30596901
 
DOI:
 
10.1093/cid/ciy1114

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December 2018
6 Reads

Incidence of Severe and Nonsevere Pertussis Among HIV-Exposed and -Unexposed Zambian Infants Through 14 Weeks of Age: Results From the Southern Africa Mother Infant Pertussis Study (SAMIPS), a Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study.

Clin Infect Dis 2016 Dec;63(suppl 4):S154-S164

Center for Global Health and Development.

Background: ?Maternal vaccination with tetanus, reduced-dose diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) could be an effective way of mitigating the high residual burden of infant morbidity and mortality caused by Bordetella pertussis To better inform such interventions, we conducted a burden-of-disease study to determine the incidence of severe and nonsevere pertussis among a population of Zambian infants.

Methods: ?Mother-infant pairs were enrolled at 1 week of life, and then seen at 2- to 3-week intervals through 14 weeks of age. At each visit, nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs were obtained from both, and symptoms were catalogued. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify cases, and a severity scoring system to triage these into severe/nonsevere, we calculated disease incidence using person-time at risk as the denominator.

Results: ?From a population of 1981 infants, we identified 10 with clinical pertussis, for an overall incidence of 2.4 cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-4.2) per 1000 infant-months and a cumulative incidence of 5.2 cases (95% CI, 2.6-9.0) per 1000 infants. Nine of 10 cases occurred within a 3-month window (May-July 2015), with highest incidence between birth and 6 weeks of age (3.5 cases per 1000 infant-months), concentrated among infants prior to vaccination or among those who had only received 1 dose of Diphtheria Tetanus whole cell Pertussis (DTwP). Maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) modestly increased the risk of infant pertussis (risk ratio, 1.8 [95% CI, .5-6.9]). Only 1 of 10 infant cases qualified as having severe pertussis. The rest presented with the mild and nonspecific symptoms of cough, coryza, and/or tachypnea. Notably, cough durations were long, exceeding 30 days in several cases, with PCRs repeatedly positive over time.

Conclusions: ?Pertussis is circulating freely among this population of Zambian infants but rarely presents with the classical symptoms of paroxysmal cough, whooping, apnea, and cyanosis. Maternal HIV appears to increase the risk, while lack of effective exposure to DTwP increased the risk.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciw526DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5106616PMC
December 2016
38 Reads
8.886 Impact Factor

Estimation of changes in the force of infection for intestinal and urogenital schistosomiasis in countries with schistosomiasis control initiative-assisted programmes.

Parasit Vectors 2015 Oct 24;8:558. Epub 2015 Oct 24.

Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.

Background: The last decade has seen an expansion of national schistosomiasis control programmes in Africa based on large-scale preventative chemotherapy. In many areas this has resulted in considerable reductions in infection and morbidity levels in treated individuals. In this paper, we quantify changes in the force of infection (FOI), defined here as the per (human) host parasite establishment rate, to ascertain the impact on transmission of some of these programmes under the umbrella of the Schistosomiasis Control Initiative (SCI).

Methods: A previous model for the transmission dynamics of Schistosoma mansoni was adapted here to S. haematobium. These models were fitted to longitudinal cohort (infection intensity) monitoring and evaluation data. Changes in the FOI following up to three annual rounds of praziquantel were estimated for Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) according to country, baseline endemicity and schistosome species. Since schistosomiasis transmission is known to be highly focal, changes in the FOI at a finer geographical scale (that of sentinel site) were also estimated for S. mansoni in Uganda.

Results: Substantial and statistically significant reductions in the FOI relative to baseline were recorded in the majority of, but not all, combinations of country, parasite species, and endemicity areas. At the finer geographical scale assessed within Uganda, marked heterogeneity in the magnitude and direction of the relative changes in FOI was observed that would not have been appreciated by a coarser-scale analysis.

Conclusions: Reductions in the rate at which humans acquire schistosomes have been achieved in many areas of SSA countries assisted by the SCI, while challenges in effectively reducing transmission persist in others. Understanding the underlying heterogeneity in the impact and performance of the control intervention at the level of the transmission site will become increasingly important for programmes transitioning from morbidity reduction to elimination of infection. Such analyses will require a fine-scale approach. The lack of association found between programmatic variables, such as therapeutic treatment coverage (recorded at district level) and changes in FOI (at sentinel site level) is discussed and recommendations are made.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-015-1138-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4619997PMC
October 2015
52 Reads
3.430 Impact Factor

High Schistosoma mansoni disease burden in a rural district of western Zambia.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2014 Nov 22;91(5):965-72. Epub 2014 Sep 22.

Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Zambia School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia; Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia; Department of Biochemistry, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Zambia School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13-0612DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4228894PMC
November 2014
53 Reads
2.700 Impact Factor

Mapping the geographical distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Zambia.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2014 Feb 20;8(2):e2714. Epub 2014 Feb 20.

Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002714DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3930513PMC
February 2014
16 Reads

Diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni without the stool: comparison of three diagnostic tests to detect Schistosoma [corrected] mansoni infection from filtered urine in Zambia.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2013 Jul 28;89(1):46-50. Epub 2013 May 28.

Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.13-0104DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3748486PMC
July 2013
71 Reads
2.700 Impact Factor

Extremely drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg infections in patients in Zambia.

J Clin Microbiol 2013 Jan 17;51(1):284-6. Epub 2012 Oct 17.

WHO Collaborating Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance in Food-Borne Pathogens and European Union Reference Laboratory for Antimicrobial Resistance, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02227-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3536257PMC
January 2013
28 Reads
3.993 Impact Factor

Human-animal anthrax outbreak in the Luangwa valley of Zambia in 2011.

Trop Doct 2012 Jul 3;42(3):136-9. Epub 2012 Apr 3.

University of Zambia, School of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 32379, Lusaka, Zambia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/td.2012.110454DOI Listing
July 2012
12 Reads
0.530 Impact Factor

Impact of iron supplementation on schistosomiasis control in Zambian school children in a highly endemic area.

Malawi Med J 2009 Mar;21(1):12-8

Tropical Diseases Research Centre, P.O. Box 71769, Ndola, Zambia.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3345721PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mmj.v21i1.10982DOI Listing
March 2009
21 Reads
0.191 Impact Factor

Susceptibility to intestinal infection and diarrhoea in Zambian adults in relation to HIV status and CD4 count.

BMC Gastroenterol 2009 Jan 22;9. Epub 2009 Jan 22.

Tropical Gastroenterology & Nutrition group, Department of Medicine, University of Zambia School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-9-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2640404PMC
January 2009
14 Reads
2.370 Impact Factor

Congenital trypanosomiasis.

J Trop Pediatr 2004 Dec;50(6):377-8

Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/50.6.377DOI Listing
December 2004
48 Reads
0.860 Impact Factor

Escherichia coli enterovirulent phenotypes in Zambians with AIDS-related diarrhoea.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2003 Sep-Oct;97(5):573-6

Department of Adult and Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0035-9203(03)80034-2DOI Listing
November 2004
12 Reads
1.931 Impact Factor

Responses of small intestinal architecture and function over time to environmental factors in a tropical population.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2004 Apr;70(4):412-9

Department of Medicine, University of Zambia School of Medicine, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

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April 2004
15 Reads
2.700 Impact Factor

Antimicrobial sensitivity in enterobacteria from AIDS patients, Zambia.

Emerg Infect Dis 2002 Jan;8(1):92-3

School of Medicine, University of Zambia, University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2730261PMC
January 2002
10 Reads
6.751 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Paul Kelly
Paul Kelly

University of Oxford

4
Isaac Zulu
Isaac Zulu

University of Zambia School of Medicine

3
Alan Fenwick
Alan Fenwick

Imperial College London

2
Henrik Hasman
Henrik Hasman

Technical University of Denmark

2
Max Katubulushi
Max Katubulushi

University of Zambia School of Medicine

2
Mable M Mutengo
Mable M Mutengo

Johns Hopkins University

2
Pimlapas Leekitcharoenphon
Pimlapas Leekitcharoenphon

Technical University of Denmark

2
Chileshe Lukwesa-Musyani
Chileshe Lukwesa-Musyani

University Teaching Hospital

2
Rene S Hendriksen
Rene S Hendriksen

National Food Institute

2
Ruth Nakazwe
Ruth Nakazwe

Technical University of Denmark

2