Mr. James I. J. Green - Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children - Maxillofacial and Dental Laboratory Manager

Mr. James I. J. Green

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children

Maxillofacial and Dental Laboratory Manager

London | United Kingdom

Additional Specialties: Maxillofacial and Dental Technology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-5750-7468

Mr. James I. J. Green - Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children - Maxillofacial and Dental Laboratory Manager

Mr. James I. J. Green

Introduction

James Ivan Jeremy Green was born at the British Hospital for Mothers and Babies in Woolwich, London in the United Kingdom on 20th January 1977 and grew up in neighbouring Eltham.

He trained as a dental technician at St Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry in conjunction with Lambeth College in London before qualifying in 2001. After a vocational training year at the then Barts and The London NHS Trust he spent the following two years at the Eastman Dental Hospital, part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, before transferring to Great Ormond Street in 2004.

James is now a maxillofacial and dental laboratory manager for Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust in London, Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust and the North Thames Cleft Centre in the United Kingdom. The North Thames Cleft Centre is a supra-regional network for patients with clefts of the lip and palate from North London, Essex and South and West Hertfordshire which is run from both hospitals.

He has written or co-written articles for peer-reviewed journals including The Angle Orthodontist, Annals of Plastic Surgery, the British Dental Journal, The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal and the Primary Dental Journal.

James is an invited speaker both nationally and internationally. He has lectured at conferences held in the UK, Germany, Italy and Poland. He has also served as a lecturer at Lambeth College.

He has co-written papers that have been presented at meetings including the 11th International Congress on Cleft Plate and Related Craniofacial Anomalies, the 2nd Congress of the International Society for Auricular Reconstruction, the 10th European Craniofacial Congress and the 67th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association which were held in Brazil, China, Sweden and the United States respectively.

James has been the recipient of awards including the Quintessence Book Prize for the best student from a London teaching hospital, the British Orthodontic Society Technicians Award and the Fellowship of the Orthodontic Technicians Association.

He is a council member and immediate past president of the Dental Technologists Association, the professional body that representing dental technicians in the United Kingdom and a council member for the Orthodontic Technicians Association, the UK based organisation for dental technicians with a special interest in orthodontics.

Primary Affiliation: Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children - London , United Kingdom

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Experience

Sep 2003 - Aug 2005
Lambeth College
Lecturer
Dental Technology
Sep 2002 - Aug 2004
University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Orthodontic Technician
Orthodontic Department, Eastman Dental Hospital
Sep 1998 - Aug 2002
Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry
Student Dental Technician
Dental Institute
Jun 2004
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust
Maxillofacial and Dental Laboratory Manager
Maxillofacial and Dental Department

Publications

15Publications

101Reads

27Profile Views

24PubMed Central Citations

Splinting After Ear Reconstruction: A Stepwise and Inexpensive Workflow Protocol.

Ann Plast Surg 2018 Apr;80(4):356-358

Background: Long-term postoperative splinting plays a role in the prevention of contracture of the grafted skin after a second-stage ear reconstruction. The scar retraction could lead to an unfavorable aesthetic outcome. Splinting could play a role to overcome or prevent the loss of projection and the obliteration of the sulcus.

Material And Methods: We have defined the characteristics of an ideal long-term splint and present a stepwise clinical protocol for the fabrication of an ethylene-vinyl acetate splint. The splint was applied to all patients included in a prospective study on the postoperative splinting regime. Ethylene-vinyl acetate has proved its safety and longevity in dental prosthetics.

Conclusions: Patient compliance was optimal, and no allergic reactions, pressure sores, or skin necrosis were reported. The splint is self-retaining and light weight. Because of its transparent color, it can be easily camouflaged. A stepwise clinical protocol for the fabrication of a low-cost patient-specific ear splint is presented.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SAP.0000000000001212DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads
1.536 Impact Factor

The Role of Mouthguards in Preventing and Reducing Sports-related Trauma.

Authors:
James Ij Green

Prim Dent J 2017 May;6(2):27-34

A mouthguard, also known as a gumshield, mouth protector or sports guard is an appliance that covers the teeth and surrounding mucosa with the aim of preventing or reducing trauma to the teeth, gingival tissue, lips and jaws. The device is usually worn on the maxillary arch and works by separating the maxillary and mandibular dentition, protecting the teeth from the surrounding soft tissue, absorbing or redistributing shock and/or stabilising the mandible during traumatic jaw closure. They may also play a role in preventing and reducing concussion by absorbing impact forces that would otherwise be transmitted through the base of the skull to the brain, although the evidence for this is less conclusive. A mouthguard will usually fall into one of three categories: stock mouthguards (which are made ready to use and are believed to give the least protection), the mouth-formed or 'boil and bite' type (which are heated in hot water, placed in the mouth and moulded to the teeth) and custom-made mouthguards (which are usually made on a stone model of the maxillary teeth and surrounding tissue and are thought to give the most protection). These devices can be made from various materials but ethylene-vinyl acetate is by far the most popular material, probably because of the ease with which it can be used for the production of custom-made mouthguards. This paper gives a review of the role of mouthguards in preventing and reducing sports-related trauma and examines the materials that are used to fabricate them.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1308/205016817821281738DOI Listing
May 2017
13 Reads
1 Citation
0.270 Impact Factor

An Overview of the Peer Assessment Rating (par) Index for Primary Dental Care Practitioners.

Authors:
James Ij Green

Prim Dent J 2016 Nov;5(4):28-37

The Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index is a valid and reliable measure of orthodontic treatment outcome and is the most widely accepted such index. Assessing outcomes with the PAR index requires the examination of pre-treatment and post-treatment orthodontic study models. Beginning with the pre-treatment models, a score is given to each feature that deviates from an ideal occlusion (all anatomical contact points adjacent, good interdigitation between posterior teeth and non-excessive overjet/overbite), the scores are then added together to give a total that represents the severity of the malocclusion. The process is then repeated with the post-treatment models. The difference between the pre-treatment and the post-treatment scores reflects the improvement that has taken place during treatment. A score of zero represents an ideal occlusion and in general the higher the score, the more extensive the malocclusion. It is currently a condition of the NHS orthodontic contract for providers to monitor a proportion of their cases using the PAR index. This paper aims to provide primary dental care practitioners with an overview of the PAR index and should provide a useful guide for those wishing to seek calibration in the use of the index.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1308/205016816820209460DOI Listing
November 2016
2 Reads
3 Citations
0.270 Impact Factor

Prevention and Management of Tooth Wear: The Role of Dental Technology.

Authors:
James Ij Green

Prim Dent J 2016 Aug;5(3):30-33

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK.

Tooth wear is a multifactorial condition and the term is used to describe all types of non-carious tooth substance loss: abrasion (produced by interaction between the teeth and other substances), attrition (produced during tooth-to-tooth contact), erosion (produced by a chemical process) and abfraction (produced through abnormal occlusal loading that predisposes tooth substance to mechanical and chemical wear). Dental technology has an important role in preventing, managing and monitoring tooth wear in a variety of ways. Hard poly(methyl methacrylate) or soft ethylene-vinyl acetate splints can be prescribed to alleviate bruxism, the most common cause of attrition. Thermoformed appliances can be used for the application of products that reduce dental erosion such as fluoride gel. Patients with significant tooth surface loss may require laboratory-made restorations, as well as removable appliances with bite planes that generate inter-occlusal space to facilitate restorations, or surgical templates to provide guidance in preparing restorations for those requiring surgical crown lengthening. Dental study models and digitised models can also prove valuable in terms of monitoring the condition. This paper presents a review of the role that dental technology plays in tooth wear prevention, management and monitoring.

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August 2016
40 Reads
5 Citations
0.270 Impact Factor

The effect of changes in primary attending doctor coverage frequency on orthodontic treatment time and results.

Angle Orthod 2015 Nov 11;85(6):1051-6. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

e  Maxillofacial and Dental Laboratory Manager, Maxillofacial and Dental Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, United Kingdom.

Objective: To determine whether changes in primary attending (PA) doctor coverage frequency caused an increase in orthodontic treatment time or a decrease in the quality of treatment results in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. The effect of T1 Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores on PA doctor coverage frequency, treatment times, and results was also evaluated.

Materials And Methods: A sample of 191 postorthodontic subjects was divided into three groups based on PA doctor coverage (high, medium, or low). Treatment times, treatment results, and other variables were compared between the three PA coverage groups. Additionally, the sample was divided into three groups based on T1 PAR scores. Attending coverage frequency, treatment times, and results were compared between the T1 PAR groups.

Results: No statistically significant differences were found in treatment time (P ?=? .128) or results (P ?=? .052). There were no statistically significant differences in the mean scores for T1 PAR (P ?=? .056), T2 PAR (P ?=? .602), patient age at T1 (P ?=? .747), total appointments (P ?=? .128), missed appointments (P ?=? .177), or cancelled appointments (P ?=? .183). Statistically significant differences were found between the low T1 PAR group and the medium and high T1 PAR groups (attending coverage, P ?=? .008; results, P < .001; treatment time, P ?=? .001).

Conclusions: Under the conditions of this study, variations in PA doctor coverage frequency did not lengthen orthodontic treatment or reduce the quality of treatment results. Low T1 PAR scores were associated with less PA coverage, less change in PAR, and shorter treatment times.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2319/120214-866.1DOI Listing
November 2015
5 Reads
4 Citations
1.277 Impact Factor

Feature: The IOC: past, present and future.

Authors:
J I J Green

Br Dent J 2015 Sep;219(5):196-7

No. It isn’t the International Olympic Committee. London has already had that opportunity. In September, London will host the International Orthodontic Congress for a third time and will be the only city in the world yet to do so. The event dates back nearly 90 years and was the first international meeting of a dental specialty but so far it has only been held in four countries: the United States, the United Kingdom, France and Australia. James Green examines the history of the congress and gives a glimpse of what we can expect from the eighth International Orthodontic Congress.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2015.690DOI Listing
September 2015
6 Reads
1.082 Impact Factor

Early effect of vomerine flap closure of the hard palate at the time of lip repair on the alveolar gap and other maxillary dimensions.

Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2014 Jan 7;51(1):43-8. Epub 2013 May 7.

Objective: Comparison of the effects of vomerine flap (VF) closure of the hard palate at the time of lip repair with non-closure of the hard palate in subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP).

Design: Retrospective, single-blinded, cohort study.

Setting: Study model sets of 40 consecutive, non-syndromic, infants with complete UCLP operated on between 1988 and 1998.

Patients: All subjects were operated on by a single consultant plastic surgeon immediately before and after the unit's change of protocol (1993), when VF closure of the hard palate was incorporated at the time of lip repair. Subjects were divided into two groups: VF ( n = 18) and non-VF (n = 22), which acted as a control group. Each subject had maxillary impressions taken before lip repair at 3 months (VF mean age = 11.7 weeks; non-VF mean age = 13.4 weeks) and before palate repair at 6 months (VF mean age = 22.8 weeks; non-VF mean age = 24.0 weeks).

Main Outcome Measures: Seven predetermined landmarks and four maxillary dimensions were computed following single-blinded analysis using a reflex microscope.

Results: Repeatability tests showed good measurement precision. The operator measurement errors were 0.00018 mm in a horizontal plane (X and Y) and 0.00028 in the vertical plane (Z). The VF group showed significant changes in the alveolar cleft width. There were no statistically significant changes in any arch-form variable between the VF and non-VF groups.

Conclusion: The decrease of alveolar arch gap width at palate repair (6 months) in the VF group was significantly more than the decrease observed in the non-VF group, and there was no significant decrease in the, anterior and posterior arch width or anteroposterior length of the hard palate in the VF group compared with the non-VF group.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1597/11-297DOI Listing
January 2014
29 Reads
4 Citations
1.238 Impact Factor

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