Publications by authors named "Jalal Shayegh"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of a combination of Mass and Dutch variant as an inactivated vaccine against variant 2 avian infectious bronchitis virus challenge.

Microb Pathog 2021 Jul 5;156:104937. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.

The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of inactivated vaccines combining Mass and Dutch variants as vaccine boosters after H120 priming on inhibiting variant 2 viral load in the kidneys (as the target organ) and reducing fecal shedding. Ciliostasis score and antibody response were investigated as well. A total of 150 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicken were divided into six groups. All groups were vaccinated with a single dose of attenuated H120 vaccine except for two (no vaccine groups). Then, three groups received booster vaccines with inactivated polyvalent vaccines. At the 42 day of age, all groups were challenged with variant 2 viruses except for one (no vaccine group). Next, antibody response and infectious bronchitis virus viral load in kidneys and fecal shedding were evaluated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Then the ciliostasis score was investigated. In general, a vaccination program including a mass serotype attenuated vaccine (H120) as priming and polyvalent vaccines can significantly protect chickens against variant 2 infection through reducing viral load in kidneys and fecal shedding. Furthermore, the vaccination program can decrease ciliostasis in the epithelial ciliary tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2021.104937DOI Listing
July 2021

Prevalence of Brucella spp. in raw milk and artisanal cheese tested via real-time qPCR and culture assay.

Int J Food Microbiol 2021 Jun 31;347:109192. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Veterinary Medicine, Shabestar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shabestar, Iran.

Brucellosis is one of the most prevalent zoonotic diseases with worldwide distribution. Although the incidence of brucellosis varies widely in different regions, it is a major concern for public health around the world. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and quantity of Brucella spp. in sheep and goat raw milk, as well as artisanal cheeses produced in the North-west of Iran. To evaluate the intrinsic parameters that may affect the survival of Brucella spp., some of the cheese properties (e.g., pH, salt, moisture, and storage time before selling) were also assessed. A total of 572 samples consisting in 214 sheep raw milk, 92 goat raw milk, and 266 local artisanal cheese samples were collected. The artisanal cheeses were manufactured from a mixture of raw sheep and goat milk. According to the results, using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), 17.29%, 15.22%, and 22.93% of the sheep raw milk, goat raw milk, and artisanal cheese samples were found positive for Brucella spp., respectively. In comparison with culture assay, qPCR was 3.5 to 5 times (p < 0.05) more sensitive in the detection of Brucella spp. The results also revealed that the mean values of Brucella spp. load in sheep and goat raw milk and artisanal cheeses were 1.22, 1.55, and 1.43 log cell/ml or g, respectively. A positive correlation was found between Brucella load and successful detection of Brucella spp. by culture assay. Data also suggested a correlation (p < 0.01) between the load of Brucella spp. estimated by qPCR and pH value, salt content, and storage period of the cheese samples. However, Brucella spp. load did not correlate significantly with the moisture content. Based on the results, in any of the cheese samples with a pH value less than 4.5 and a storage period more than five months, no contamination with Brucella spp. was detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2021.109192DOI Listing
June 2021

Identification of mutations in and genes associated with prolificacy of Markhoz goats.

Arch Anim Breed 2019 14;62(2):565-570. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

School of Advanced Medical Sciences, Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

The Markhoz is a local goat breed in the Kurdistan region of Iran. The mohair obtained from these animals plays an important cultural role and is used for making local clothes in the Kurdistan region. This breed is a low-fecundity local goat, and searching for genes associated with fertility of these goats is important for their breeding. Moreover, this research is complementary to prior studies of candidate genes associated with fertility. The growth differentiation factor 9 () and bone morphogenetic protein 15 () are attractive candidates expressed by the oocyte and are associated with increased ovulation rate in sheep. However, there are no reports on single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with fertility of Markhoz goats. Hence, we studied these candidate genes and found two novel mutations (g.233C A and g.755T G) in exon I and in exon II, respectively. Furthermore, we investigated their association with prolificacy. These nucleotide changes are detectable with the PCR-RFLP method and can be used in the screening for highly fecund goats. Both of the mutations significantly increased litter size in heterozygote form for and homozygote form for in this goat breed. Homozygote females for the mutation were not identified in the Markhoz breed, which is similar to the situation found in Belclare sheep, small-tailed Han sheep, and Jining Grey goats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/aab-62-565-2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6853135PMC
October 2019

Pharmacological and therapeutic effects of Peganum harmala and its main alkaloids.

Pharmacogn Rev 2013 Jul;7(14):199-212

Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary, Shabestar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shabestar, Iran.

Wild Syrian rue (Peganum harmala L. family Zygophyllaceae) is well-known in Iran and various parts of this plant including, its seeds, bark, and root have been used as folk medicine. Recent years of research has demonstrated different pharmacological and therapeutic effects of P. harmala and its active alkaloids, especially harmine and harmaline. Analytical studies on the chemical composition of the plant show that the most important constituents of this plant are beta-carboline alkaloids such as harmalol, harmaline, and harmine. Harmine is the most studied among these naturally occurring alkaloids. In addition to P. harmala (Syrian rue), these beta-carbolines are present in many other plants such as Banisteria caapi and are used for the treatment of different diseases. This article reviews the traditional uses and pharmacological effects of total extract and individual active alkaloids of P. harmala (Syrian rue).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-7847.120524DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3841998PMC
July 2013

Quantitative real-time PCR and culture examination of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at farm level.

Vet Microbiol 2013 Feb 5;162(1):160-5. Epub 2012 Sep 5.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture Science, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran.

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease in ruminants and may contribute to Crohn's disease in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence and quantity of MAP in cattle feces and milk in the Iranian context. In addition, we evaluated the effect of cattle age as well as farming system as risk factors contributing to MAP load. For this, a total sample of 373 consisting of 150 cattle feces (CF), 150 individual cow's milk (ICM), as well as 73 bulk-tank milk (BTM) was collected randomly and regardless of the cattle health status. The samples were assayed using F57 quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and culture method. According to the results of qPCR which was found ≈ 10 times more sensitive than culture assay, MAP was detected in 68.66% (103/150) of the CF, 12% (18/150) of the ICM and 52.05% (38/73) of the BTM samples. In contrast to the previous reports, the quantity of MAP in the BTM (2.03-5.97 log cfu/50 ml) was statistically (p<0.01) higher than the ICM (0.90-1.97 log cfu/50 ml). Data suggested a direct relation (p<0.01) between the cattle age and the quantity of MAP in the CF samples, while the relation was not statistically significant (p>0.05) for the ICM. In addition, MAP load in the BTM samples obtained from traditional farms was significantly (p<0.01) higher than that of the industrial ones, while the differences in CF and ICM was not significant (p>0.05).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2012.08.026DOI Listing
February 2013

Effect of in ovo ghrelin administration on serum malondialdehyde level in newly-hatched chickens.

Asian Pac J Trop Biomed 2012 Jan;2(1):47-9

Department of Animal Science, Shabestar Branch, Islamic Azad University, 53815-159 Shabestar, Iran.

Objective: To investigate effects of in ovo ghrelin administration on serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level in newly-hatched chickens.

Methods: Fertilized eggs were divided into 7 groups: group T1 as control (without injection), group T2 (in ovo injected with 50 ng/egg ghrelin on day 5), group T3 (in ovo injected with 100 ng/egg ghrelin on day 5), group T4 (in ovo injected with 50 ng/egg ghrelin on day 10), group T5 (in ovo injected with 100 ng/egg ghrelin on day 10), group T6 (in ovo injected with solvent: 1% acetic acid, without ghrelin on day 5) and group T7 (in ovo injected with solvent without ghrelin on day 10). After hatching, serum MDA concentrations were determined.

Results: Ghrelin administrated groups (T2, T3, T4 and T5) had lower serum MDA level in comparison with control group (T1) or solvent injected groups (T6 and T7). T2 and T3 (ghrelin injection on day 5) had significantly lower MDA concentrations (4.10 and 4.60 nmol/mL, respectively) in comparison with other groups. In T4 and T5, MDA levels were lower than T1, T6 and T7 (non-ghrelin administrated groups) (9.53 and 9.50 in comparison with 10.73, 10.03 and 10.13 nmol/mL) and were higher than T2 and T3.

Conclusions: It can be concluded that in ovo administration of ghrelin can have anti-oxidative protection and reduce serum MDA level. Ghrelin administration on day 5 of incubation is more efficient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(11)60188-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3609205PMC
January 2012

Rapid virulence typing of Pasteurella multocida by multiplex PCR.

Res Vet Sci 2009 Dec 2;87(3):355-7. Epub 2009 May 2.

Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University (Medical Sciences), Tabriz, Iran.

The gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida constitutes a heterogeneous species associated with wide range of disease in many animals. Isolates are classified into five groups based on capsular antigen (capA, B, D, E and F). Recently, a new valuable PCR-based method was introduced to determine the epidemiological correlation between P. multocida infection and existence of virulence genes including tbpA, pfhA, toxA and hgbB. However, this method is tedious and laborious. Thus, in the current study, we designed a reliable multiplex PCR method for rapid detection of virulence genes in P. multocida. Eighty seven strains of P. multocida isolated from various clinically healthy and infected hosts were examined by uniplex PCR method for each virulence associated genes. Based on our improved and simplified multiplex PCR method, rapid detection of four virulence genes was accomplished. It is proposed that its implementation may benefit the epidemiological investigations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rvsc.2009.04.004DOI Listing
December 2009