Publications by authors named "Jakob Fridriksson"

4 Publications

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An integrative genomic and epigenomic approach for the study of transcriptional regulation.

PLoS One 2008 Mar 26;3(3):e1882. Epub 2008 Mar 26.

Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America.

The molecular heterogeneity of acute leukemias and other tumors constitutes a major obstacle towards understanding disease pathogenesis and developing new targeted-therapies. Aberrant gene regulation is a hallmark of cancer and plays a central role in determining tumor phenotype. We predicted that integration of different genome-wide epigenetic regulatory marks along with gene expression levels would provide greater power in capturing biological differences between leukemia subtypes. Gene expression, cytosine methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) acetylation were measured using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) specimens. We found that DNA methylation and H3K9 acetylation distinguished these leukemias of distinct cell lineage, as expected, but that an integrative analysis combining the information from each platform revealed hundreds of additional differentially expressed genes that were missed by gene expression arrays alone. This integrated analysis also enhanced the detection and statistical significance of biological pathways dysregulated in AML and ALL. Integrative epigenomic studies are thus feasible using clinical samples and provide superior detection of aberrant transcriptional programming than single-platform microarray studies.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001882PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2266992PMC
March 2008

Glucose-induced lipogenesis in pancreatic beta-cells is dependent on SREBP-1.

Mol Cell Endocrinol 2005 Aug;240(1-2):94-106

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense.

High concentrations of glucose induce de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells and chronic exposure of elevated glucose and fatty acids synergize to induce accumulation of triglycerides, a phenomenon termed glucolipotoxicity. Here we investigate the role of sterol-regulatory element binding proteins in glucose-induced lipogenesis in the pancreatic beta-cell line INS-1E. We show that glucose induces SREBP-1c expression and SREBP-1 activity independent of insulin secretion and signaling. Using adenoviral expression of SREBP-1c and a SREBP-mutant we show that lipogenic gene expression, de novo fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation are induced primarily through sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) and not E-Boxes. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative SREBP compromises glucose induction of some lipogenic genes and significantly reduces glucose-induction of de novo fatty acid synthesis. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that SREBP activity is necessary for full glucose induction of de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mce.2005.05.005DOI Listing
August 2005

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) potentiates, whereas PPARgamma attenuates, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

Endocrinology 2005 Aug 5;146(8):3266-76. Epub 2005 May 5.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.

Fatty acids (FAs) are known to be important regulators of insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. FA-coenzyme A esters have been shown to directly stimulate the secretion process, whereas long-term exposure of beta-cells to FAs compromises glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by mechanisms unknown to date. It has been speculated that some of these long-term effects are mediated by members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family via an induction of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2). In this study we show that adenoviral coexpression of PPARalpha and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) in INS-1E beta-cells synergistically and in a dose- and ligand-dependent manner increases the expression of known PPARalpha target genes and enhances FA uptake and beta-oxidation. In contrast, ectopic expression of PPARgamma/RXRalpha increases FA uptake and deposition as triacylglycerides. Although the expression of PPARalpha/RXRalpha leads to the induction of UCP2 mRNA and protein, this is not accompanied by reduced hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, indicating that under these conditions, increased UCP2 expression is insufficient for dissipation of the mitochondrial proton gradient. Importantly, whereas expression of PPARgamma/RXRalpha attenuates GSIS, the expression of PPARalpha/RXRalpha potentiates GSIS in rat islets and INS-1E cells without affecting the mitochondrial membrane potential. These results show a strong subtype specificity of the two PPAR subtypes alpha and gamma on lipid partitioning and insulin secretion when systematically compared in a beta-cell context.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2004-1430DOI Listing
August 2005

SREBP-1 dimerization specificity maps to both the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains: use of a dominant negative.

J Biol Chem 2004 Mar 31;279(12):11863-74. Epub 2003 Dec 31.

Laboratory of Metabolism, NCI, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

The mammalian SREBP family contains two genes that code for B-HLH-ZIP proteins that bind sequence-specific DNA to regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. We have designed a dominant negative (DN), termed A-SREBP-1, that inhibits the DNA binding of either SREBP protein. A-SREBP-1 consists of the dimerization domain of B-SREBP-1 and a polyglutamic acid sequence that replaces the basic region. A-SREBP-1 heterodimerizes with either B-SREBP-1 or B-SREBP-2, and both heterodimers are more stable than B-SREBP-1 bound to DNA. Circular dichroism thermal denaturation studies show that the B-SREBP-1.A-SREBP-1 heterodimer is -9.8 kcal mol(-1) dimer(-1) more stable than the B-SREBP-1 homodimer. EMSA assays demonstrate that A-SREBP-1 can inhibit the DNA binding of either B-SREBP-1 or B-SREBP-2 in an equimolar competition but does not inhibit the DNA binding of the three B-HLH-ZIP proteins MAX, USF, or MITF, even at 100 molar eq. Chimeric proteins containing the HLH domain of SREBP-1 and the leucine zipper from either MAX, USF, or MITF indicate that both the HLH and leucine zipper regions of SREBP-1 contribute to its dimerization specificity. Transient co-transfection studies demonstrate that A-SREBP-1 can inhibit the transactivation of SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 but not USF. A-SREBP-1 may be useful in metabolic diseases where SREBP family members are overexpressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M308000200DOI Listing
March 2004