Publications by authors named "Jaime Silangcruz"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Aptamer-containing surfaces for selective capture of CD4 expressing cells.

Langmuir 2012 Aug 14;28(34):12544-9. Epub 2012 Aug 14.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616, United States.

Aptamers have recently emerged as an excellent alternative to antibodies because of their inherent stability and ease of modification. In this paper, we describe the development of an aptamer-based surface for capture of cells expressing CD4 antigen. The glass or silicon surfaces were modified with amine-terminated silanes and then modified with thiolated RNA aptamer against CD4. Modification of the surface was first characterized by ellipsometry to demonstrate assembly of biointerface components and to show specific capture of recombinant CD4 protein. Subsequently, surfaces were challenged with model lymphocytes (cell lines) that were either positive or negative for CD4 antigen. Our experiments show that aptamer-functionalized surfaces have similar capture efficiency to substrates containing anti-CD4 antibody. To mimick capture of specific T-cells from a complex cell mixture, aptamer-modified surfaces were exposed to binary mixtures containing Molt-3 cells (CD4+) spiked into Daudi B cells (CD4-). 94% purity of CD4 cells was observed on aptamer-containing surfaces from an initial fraction of 15% of CD4. Given the importance of CD4 cell enumeration in HIV/AIDS diagnosis and monitoring, aptamer-based devices may offer an opportunity for novel cell detection strategies and may yield more robust and less expensive blood analysis devices in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la2050338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3538135PMC
August 2012

Characterization and Quantification of Nanoparticle-Antibody Conjugates on Cells Using C(60) ToF SIMS in the Event-By-Event Bombardment/Detection Mode.

Int J Mass Spectrom 2011 Jun;303(2-3):97-102

Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.

Cluster C(60) ToF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) operated in the event-by-event bombardment-detection method has been applied to: a) quantify the binding density of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs)-antiCD4 conjugates on the cell surface; b) identify the binding sites between AuNPs and antibody. Briefly, our method consists of recording the secondary ions, SIs, individually emitted from a single C(60) (1,2+) impact. From the cumulative mass spectral data we selected events where a specific SI was detected. The selected records revealed the SIs co-ejected from the nanovolume impacted by an individual C(60) with an emission area of ~ 10nm in diameter as an emission depth of 5-10 nm. The fractional coverage is obtained as the ratio of the effective number of projectile impacts on a specified sampling area (N(e)) to the total number of impacts (N(0)). In the negative ion mass spectrum, the palmitate (C(16)H(31)O(2) (-)) and oletate (C(18)H(33)O(2) (-)) fatty acid ions present signals from lipid membrane of the cells. The signals at m/z 197 (Au(-)) and 223 (AuCN(-)) originate from the AuNPs labeled antibodies (antiCD4) bound to the cell surface antigens. The characteristic amino acid ions validate the presence of antiCD4. A coincidence mass spectrum extracted with ion at m/z 223 (AuCN(-)) reveals the presence of cysteine at m/z 120, documenting the closeness of cysteine and the AuNP. Their proximity suggests that the binding site for AuNP on the antibody is the sulfur-terminal cysteine. The fractional coverage of membrane lipid was determined to be ~23% of the cell surfaces while the AuNPs was found to be ~21%. The novel method can be implemented on smaller size NPs, it should thus be applicable for studies on size dependent binding of NP-antibody conjugates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijms.2011.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3117593PMC
June 2011

Lensfree holographic imaging of antibody microarrays for high-throughput detection of leukocyte numbers and function.

Anal Chem 2010 May;82(9):3736-44

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Characterization of leukocytes is an integral part of blood analysis and blood-based diagnostics. In the present paper, we combine lensless holographic imaging with antibody microarrays for rapid and multiparametric analysis of leukocytes from human blood. Monoclonal antibodies (Abs) specific for leukocyte surface antigens (CD4 and CD8) and cytokines (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-2) were printed in an array so as to juxtapose cell capture and cytokine detection antibody (Ab) spots. Integration of Ab microarrays into a microfluidic flow chamber (4 muL volume) followed by incubation with human blood resulted in capture of CD4 and CD8 T-cells on specific Ab spots. On-chip mitogenic activation of these cells induced release of cytokine molecules that were subsequently captured on neighboring anticytokine Ab spots. The binding of IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma molecules on their respective Ab spots was detected using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anticytokine Abs and a visible color reagent. Lensfree holographic imaging was then used to rapidly ( approximately 4 s) enumerate CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes captured on Ab spots and to quantify the cytokine signal emanating from IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma spots on the same chip. To demonstrate the utility of our approach for infectious disease monitoring, blood samples of healthy volunteers and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients were analyzed to determine the CD4/CD8 ratio, an important HIV/AIDS diagnostic marker. The ratio obtained by lensfree on-chip imaging of CD4 and CD8 T-cells captured on Ab spots was in close agreement with conventional microscopy-based cell counting. The present paper, describing tandem use of Ab microarrays and lensfree holographic imaging, paves the way for future development of miniature cytometry devices for multiparametric blood analysis at the point of care or in a resource-limited setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac100142aDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2864520PMC
May 2010

Micropatterning of proteins and mammalian cells on indium tin oxide.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2009 Nov;1(11):2592-601

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA.

This paper describes a novel surface engineering approach that combines oxygen plasma treatment and electrochemical activation to create micropatterned cocultures on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. In this approach, photoresist was patterned onto an ITO substrate modified with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) silane. The photoresist served as a stencil during exposure of the surface to oxygen plasma. Upon incubation with collagen (I) solution and removal of the photoresist, the ITO substrate contained collagen regions surrounded by nonfouling PEG silane. Chemical analysis carried out with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) at different stages in micropatterned construction verified removal of PEG-silane during oxygen plasma and presence of collagen and PEG molecules on the same surface. Imaging ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to further investigate micropatterned ITO surfaces. Biological application of this micropatterning strategy was demonstrated through selective attachment of mammalian cells on the ITO substrate. Importantly, after seeding the first cell type, the ITO surfaces could be activated by applying negative voltage (-1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl). This resulted in removal of nonfouling PEG layer and allowed to attach another cell type onto the same surface and to create micropatterned cocultures. Micropatterned cocultures of primary hepatocytes and fibroblasts created by this strategy remained functional after 9 days as verified by analysis of hepatic albumin. The novel surface engineering strategy described here may be used to pattern multiple cell types on an optically transparent and conductive substrate and is envisioned to have applications in tissue engineering and biosensing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/am900508mDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2901501PMC
November 2009

Detecting cytokine release from single T-cells.

Anal Chem 2009 Oct;81(19):8150-6

Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, USA.

The cytokine production by leukocytes correlates with body's ability to mount an immune response and therefore has high diagnostic value. In the present study we employed microfabricated surfaces to capture T-cells from minimally processed human blood, arrange these cells into a single cell array, and then detect interferon (IFN)-gamma released from individual cells. The fabrication of cell capture surfaces started with coating a silane-modified glass slide with a uniform layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel. The hydrogel-coated slide was lyophilized and then incubated with a mixture of monoclonal anti-IFN-gamma and anti-CD4 antibodies (Abs). To define sites for single cell attachment, PEG hydrogel microwells (20 microm diameter) were photolithographically patterned on top of the Ab-containing hydrogel layer. This micropatterning process resulted in fabrication of PEG hydrogel microwells with Ab-decorated bottom and nonfouling walls. To minimize the blood volume requirement and to precisely define shear stress conditions, the engineered surface was enclosed inside a PDMS-based microfluidic device. Introduction of red blood cell (RBC) depleted whole human blood followed by controlled washing led to the isolation of individual CD4 T-cells within PEG microwells. Mitogenic activation and immunofluorescent staining performed inside the microfluidic chamber revealed IFN-gamma cytokine signal colocalized with specific T-cells. The device and process presented here will be expanded in the future to enable multiparametric functional analysis of immune cells organized into high density single cell arrays.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac901390jDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2755614PMC
October 2009