Publications by authors named "Jae Hak Sohn"

58 Publications

Fucosterol of Marine Macroalgae: Bioactivity, Safety and Toxicity on Organism.

Mar Drugs 2021 Sep 27;19(10). Epub 2021 Sep 27.

Seafood Research Center, Industry Academy Cooperation Foundation (IACF), Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

Fucosterol (24-ethylidene cholesterol) is a bioactive compound belonging to the sterol group that can be isolated from marine algae. Fucosterol of marine algae exhibits various biological activities including anti-osteoarthritic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-photoaging, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, anti-neurological, antioxidant, algicidal, anti-obesity, and antimicrobial. Numerous studies on fucosterol, mainly focusing on the quantification and characterization of the chemical structure, bioactivities, and health benefits of fucosterol, have been published. However, there is no comprehensive review on safety and toxicity levels of fucosterol of marine algae. This review aims to discuss the bioactivities, safety, and toxicity of fucosterol comprehensively, which is important for the application and development of fucosterol as a bioactive compound in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. We used four online databases to search for literature on fucosterol published between 2002 and 2020. We identified, screened, selected, and analyzed the literature using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses method and identified 43 studies for review. Despite the potential applications of fucosterol, we identified the need to fill certain related research gaps. Fucosterol exhibited low toxicity in animal cell lines, human cell lines, and animals. However, studies on the safety and toxicity of fucosterol at the clinical stage, which are required before fucosterol is developed for the industry, are lacking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md19100545DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8539623PMC
September 2021

PTP1B Inhibitory Secondary Metabolites from an Antarctic Fungal Strain sp. SF-7394.

Molecules 2021 Sep 10;26(18). Epub 2021 Sep 10.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Korea.

Chemical investigation of the Antarctic lichen-derived fungal strain sp. SF-7394 yielded a new amphilectane-type diterpene, acrepseudoterin (), and a new acorane-type sesquiterpene glycoside, isocordycepoloside A (). In addition, three known fungal metabolites, (-)-ternatin (), [D-Leu]-ternatin (), and pseurotin A (), were isolated from the EtOAc extract of the fungal strain. Their structures were mainly elucidated by analyzing their NMR and MS data. The absolute configuration of was proposed by electronic circular dichroism calculations, and the absolute configuration of the sugar unit in was determined by a chemical method. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were evaluated by enzymatic assays; results indicated that acrepseudoterin () and [D-Leu]-ternatin () dose-dependently inhibited the enzyme activity with IC values of 22.8 ± 1.1 μM and 14.8 ± 0.3 μM, respectively. Moreover, compound was identified as a competitive inhibitor of PTP1B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26185505DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8468024PMC
September 2021

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Metabolites from Antarctic Fungal Strain sp. SF-7343 in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Sep 7;22(18). Epub 2021 Sep 7.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Korea.

Chemical investigation of the Antarctic fungi sp. SF-7343 revealed four known secondary fungal metabolites: alternate C (), altenusin (), alternariol (), and altenuene (). The compound structures were identified primarily by NMR and MS analyses. Atopic dermatitis, an inflammatory disease, is driven by the abnormal activation of T helper (Th) 2 cells and barrier dysfunction. We attempted to identify the anti-inflammatory components of SF-7343. Initial screening showed that compounds and inhibited the secretion of interleukin-8 and -6 in tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ-treated HaCaT cells, and these compounds also showed inhibitory effects on CCL5 and CCL22. Compounds and also downregulated the protein expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and upregulated the expression of filaggrin and involcurin. The mechanism study results showed that compounds and inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B p65 and the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3. Compound , but not compound , significantly promoted the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. The effects of compound were partly reversed by co-treatment with a HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential value of Antarctic fungal strain SF-7343 isolates as a bioresource for bioactive compounds to prevent skin inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22189674DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8468741PMC
September 2021

Effects of Vacuum Frying on the Preparation of Ready-to-Heat Batter-Fried and Sauced Chub Mackerel ().

Foods 2021 Aug 23;10(8). Epub 2021 Aug 23.

Seafood Research Center, IACF, Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

Chub mackerel (CM) is a commercial fish in Korea, owing to its availability and nutritional values. This study aimed to develop a ready-to-heat (RTH) Korean preparation of CM, known as We utilized vacuum frying technology to fry the CM and evaluated its quality. Conventional frying with a deep fryer was performed in parallel to assess the superiority of the vacuum fryer. We optimized the frying conditions of vacuum frying (VBF) and deep frying (DBF) using response surface methodology. At optimum conditions of 95 °C for 7 min 42 s, VBF produced better sensory, chemical, and microbial properties than DBF at 190 °C for 5 min 30 s. The nutritional values, including amino acid and fatty acid contents, were investigated and found to be higher in VBF than in DBF. Sensory properties also showed better scores on VBF than DBF, especially in appearance, aroma, taste, and overall acceptability. The VBF produced lower volatile basic nitrogen (VBN), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and total bacterial count (TBC) than DBF. The findings confirmed that vacuum frying is a better option to produce RTH , since it provides less oxidation and maintains the product quality. Using the Arrhenius approach, the product was concluded to preserve both quality and safety for 9 months of storage at -18 °C.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10081962DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8393352PMC
August 2021

: Pharmacological and Nutritional Properties.

Foods 2021 Jul 19;10(7). Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Seafood Research Center, Industry Academy Cooperation Foundation (IACF), Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

The brown seaweed (syn. ), commonly known as "Hijiki", has been utilized in traditional cuisine and medicine in East Asian countries for several centuries. has attracted much attention owing to its rich nutritional and pharmacological properties. However, there has been no comprehensive review of the nutritional and pharmacological properties of . The aim of this systematic review was to provide detailed information from the published literature on the nutritional and pharmacological properties of . A comprehensive online search of the literature was conducted by accessing databases, such as PubMed, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar, for published studies on the nutritional and pharmacological properties of between 2010 and 2021. A total of 916 articles were screened from all the databases using the method. Screening based on the setdown criteria resulted in 59 articles, which were used for this review. In this review, we found that there has been an increase in the number of publications on the pharmacological and nutritional properties of over the last 10 years. In the last 10 years, studies have focused on the proximate, mineral, polysaccharide, and bioactive compound composition, and pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anticancer, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, photoprotective, neuroprotective, antidiabetic, immunomodulatory, osteoprotective, and gastroprotective properties of extracts. Overall, further studies and strategies are required to develop as a promising resource for the nutrition and pharmacological industries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10071660DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8306711PMC
July 2021

Development of a Home Meal Replacement Product Containing Braised Mackerel () with Radish ().

Foods 2021 May 19;10(5). Epub 2021 May 19.

Seafood Research Center, IACF, Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

The coronavirus disease pandemic has contributed to increasing convenience in food preferences. Home meal replacement (HMR) products are ready-to-eat, -cook, or -heat foods, providing convenience for consumers. We developed a HMR product containing mackerel as a protein- and lipid-rich source using various food-processing technologies to maintain its nutritional content and prolong shelf life. The HMR product contained mackerel, radish, and sauce in a ratio of 5:1:4. Raw frozen mackerels were thawed by using a high-frequency defroster before being braised using a superheated steam roaster. Response surface methodology was employed to obtain the optimal heating conditions of 181 °C for 9 min. The final test HMR product was packed in a polypropylene plastic bowl prior to freezing at -35 °C for 1 h using a quick freezing system. The HMR product developed using these technologies exhibited stable microbiological and chemical properties for 90 days of storage. Sensory scores gradually decreased with increasing storage temperature and time. Protein content in the HMR product was 13%, 40% of which comprised essential amino acids; lipid content was 13.4%, 18% of which was composed of docosahexaenoic acid. The HMR product can preserve its quality and is considered safe for consumption for up to 40 months of storage at -18 °C.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10051135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8161259PMC
May 2021

Antifungal and Larvicidal Activities of Phlorotannins from Brown Seaweeds.

Mar Drugs 2021 Apr 16;19(4). Epub 2021 Apr 16.

Seafood Research Center, Industry-Academic Cooperation Foundation, Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

Phlorotannins are secondary metabolites produced by brown seaweeds with antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and larvicidal activities. Phlorotannins' structures are formed by dibenzodioxin, ether and phenyl, ether, or phenyl linkages. The polymerization of phlorotannins is used to classify and characterize. The structural diversity of phlorotannins grows as polymerization increases. They have been characterized extensively with respect to chemical properties and functionality. However, review papers of the biological activities of phlorotannins have focused on their antibacterial and antiviral effects, and reviews of their broad antifungal and larvicidal effects are lacking. Accordingly, evidence for the effectiveness of phlorotannins as antifungal and larvicidal agents is discussed in this review. Online databases (ScienceDirect, PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Science) were used to identify relevant articles. In total, 11 articles were retrieved after duplicates were removed and exclusion criteria were applied. Phlorotannins from brown seaweeds show antifungal activity against dermal and plant fungi, and larvicidal activity against mosquitos and marine invertebrate larvae. However, further studies of the biological activity of phlorotannins against fungal and parasitic infections in aquaculture fish, livestock, and companion animals are needed for systematic analyses of their effectiveness. The research described in this review emphasizes the potential applications of phlorotannins as pharmaceutical, functional food, pesticide, and antifouling agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md19040223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8073715PMC
April 2021

Effects of Phlorotannins on Organisms: Focus on the Safety, Toxicity, and Availability of Phlorotannins.

Foods 2021 Feb 19;10(2). Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Seafood Research Center, IACF, Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

Phlorotannins are polyphenolic compounds produced via polymerization of phloroglucinol, and these compounds have varying molecular weights (up to 650 kDa). Brown seaweeds are rich in phlorotannins compounds possessing various biological activities, including algicidal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and anticancer activities. Many review papers on the chemical characterization and quantification of phlorotannins and their functionality have been published to date. However, although studies on the safety and toxicity of these phlorotannins have been conducted, there have been no articles reviewing this topic. In this review, the safety and toxicity of phlorotannins in different organisms are discussed. Online databases (Science Direct, PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Science) were searched, yielding 106 results. Following removal of duplicates and application of the exclusion criteria, 34 articles were reviewed. Phlorotannins from brown seaweeds showed low toxicity in cell lines, invertebrates, microalgae, seaweeds, plants, animals (fish, mice, rats, and dogs), and humans. However, the safety and toxicity of phlorotannins in aquaculture fish, livestock, and companion animals are limited. Further studies in these organisms are necessary to carry out a systematic analysis of the safety and toxicity of phlorotannins and to further identify the potential of phlorotannins as functional foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10020452DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7922789PMC
February 2021

Improvement of Sensorial, Physicochemical, Microbiological, Nutritional and Fatty Acid Attributes and Shelf Life Extension of Hot Smoked Half-Dried Pacific Saury ().

Foods 2020 Jul 27;9(8). Epub 2020 Jul 27.

Seafood Research Center, Silla University, #605, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Korea.

Half-dried Pacific saury of (HDPS) is a fatty fish of high nutritional value with remarkable consumer interest in the Asia Pacific region, however, it undergoes various deteriorative changes associated with browning, bacterial contamination, oxidation, and decreased sensory attributes while marketed in various processed forms. To withstand these complications, research aimed to investigate the hot smoking technology to improve physicochemical, microbiological, and sensory attributes of HDPS with prolonged shelf life in storage conditions. The HDPS fillets were processed with hot smoking (70 °C) using various sawdust materials of Apple, Chestnut, Oak, Cherry, and Walnut, wherein the smoke time was set at different time points of 0, 20, 25, and 30 min. The results indicated that 25 min of smoking time with the selective Oak sawdust showed better sensorial characteristics, physicochemical properties, and microbiological qualities. Moreover, HDPS possessed higher nutritional value and valuable functional fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, having a storage ability of up to 30 days at 10 °C. The processed HDPS offered a reduced level of Trimethylamine-N-oxide and Benzo[a]pyrene contents, indicating the acceptable and safe for human consumption. Therefore, HDPS with hot smoking could likely be a promising technique for preserving the premium quality of the product by providing desired characteristics of health and nutrition to end-point consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods9081009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7466296PMC
July 2020

Effect of hot smoking treatment in improving Sensory and Physicochemical Properties of processed Japanese Spanish Mackerel .

Food Sci Nutr 2020 Jul 11;8(7):3957-3968. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Seafood Research Center IACF Silla University Busan Korea.

Japanese Spanish Mackerel (JSM) (Cuvier 1832) is an important commercial fish species in South Korea. The postharvest handling, preservation, and storage of JSM have not been clearly understood, and therefore, it is very often oxidized to produce off-flavor while marketed as the raw or frozen state. To overcome these problems, the present study was designed to adapt the hot smoke processing technique for improving the sensorial, physicochemical, and microbial qualities of JSM with extended shelf life. The hot smoking (70°C) with different sawdusts at the different smoke times (0, 20, 25, and 30 min) was applied to process JSM fillet. The smoked JSM obtained higher sensory attributes (appearance, odor, taste, color, texture, and overall preferences) and suppressed bacterial growth, pH, volatile base nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species, and trimethylamine N-oxide at an optimum smoking time of 25 min using oak sawdust. Moreover, it possessed higher nutritional value and beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 4.19 g/100 g, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 1.82 g/100 g. The smoked JSM product extended shelf life up to 42 days at 10°C storage temperature. The overall findings indicate that the hot smoking technology with JSM could be effective in achieving good sensorial, nutritional, and functional attributes to the consumer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.1715DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7382142PMC
July 2020

Terrein suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation through inhibition of NF-κB pathway by activating Nrf2/HO-1 signaling in BV2 and primary microglial cells.

J Pharmacol Sci 2020 Jul 27;143(3):209-218. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan, 54538, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

In the course of our continuous investigation on the bioactive marine-derived fungal metabolites, terrein was isolated from marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-7181. Terrein inhibited the overproduction of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE), as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 and primary microglial cells. This compound also repressed the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. These inhibitory effects of terrein were associated with the inactivation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway through suppression of the translocation of p65/p50 heterodimer into the nucleus, the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor kappa B (IκB)-α and the DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit. In addition, terrein induced the protein expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 through the activation of nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) in BV2 and primary microglial cells. The anti-inflammatory effect of terrein was blocked by pre-treatment with a selective HO-1 inhibitor, suggesting that its anti-neuroinflammatory effect is mediated by HO-1 induction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jphs.2020.01.011DOI Listing
July 2020

Anti-Inflammatory and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Metabolites from the Antarctic Marine-Derived Fungal Strain SF-7123.

Mar Drugs 2020 May 9;18(5). Epub 2020 May 9.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Korea.

A chemical investigation of the marine-derived fungal strain (SF-7123) revealed a new citromycetin (polyketide) derivative () and four known secondary fungal metabolites, i.e, neuchromenin (), asterric acid (), myxotrichin C (), and deoxyfunicone (). The structures of these metabolites were identified primarily by extensive analysis of their spectroscopic data, including NMR and MS data. Results from the initial screening of anti-inflammatory effects showed that , , and possessed inhibitory activity against the excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells, with IC values of 2.7 µM, 28.1 µM, and 10.6 µM, respectively. Compounds , , and also inhibited the excessive production of NO, with IC values of 4.7 µM, 41.5 µM, and 40.1 µM, respectively, in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. In addition, these compounds inhibited LPS-induced overproduction of prostaglandin E in both cellular models. Further investigation of the most active compound () revealed that these anti-inflammatory effects were associated with a suppressive effect on the over-expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2. Finally, we showed that the anti-inflammatory effects of compound were mediated via the downregulation of inflammation-related pathways such as those dependent on nuclear factor kappa B and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in LPS-stimulated BV2 and RAW264.7 cells. In the evaluation of the inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on protein tyrosine phosphate 1B (PTP1B) activity, compound was identified as a noncompetitive inhibitor of PTP1B, with an IC value of 19.2 µM, and compound was shown to inhibit the activity of PTP1B, with an IC value of 24.3 µM, by binding to the active site of the enzyme. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential value of marine-derived fungal isolates as a bioresource for bioactive compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md18050247DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7281349PMC
May 2020

Identification and characterization of novel antioxidant peptides from mackerel (Scomber japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysates.

Food Chem 2020 Apr 15;323:126809. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Seafood Research Center, IACF, Silla University, 606, Advanced Seafood Processing Complex, Wonyang-ro, Amnam-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 49277, Republic of Korea; Department of Food Biotechnology, Division of Bioindustry, College of Medical and Life Sciences, Silla University, 140, Baegyang-daero 700 beon-gil, Sasang-gu, Busan 46958, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Antioxidant peptides are commonly used as functional ingredient in the pharmaceutical industries. Here, we characterized the antioxidant peptides from mackerel muscle protein hydrolysates (MPHs). MPHs showing higher bioactivities were separated into seven groups by FPLC. MPH-3 which exhibited significantly higher (p < 0.05) DPPH scavenging activity (32.12 ± 3.01%) was fractionated using RP-HPLC to obtain purified fractions A and B, which were further subjected to MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS for mass fingerprinting. Fraction A exhibited the highest (p < 0.05) DPPH scavenging activity (34.11 ± 1.52%), and it contained 21 peptides characterized by LC-MS/MS-. Ten peptides were synthesized, and their antioxidant activities were evaluated; one of the peptides, ALSTWTLQLGSTSFSASPM, showed the highest (p < 0.05) DPPH scavenging activity (36.34 ± 4.64%) and another peptide, LGTLLFIAIPI, exhibited the highest (p < 0.05) SOD-like activity (28.94 ± 4.19%). The results of this study indicate that MPHs could serve as a suitable source of antioxidant peptides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.126809DOI Listing
April 2020

Anti-inflammatory effect of 3,7-dimethyl-1,8-hydroxy-6-methoxyisochroman via nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells.

Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol 2019 Apr 6;41(2):337-348. Epub 2019 May 6.

a College of Pharmacy , Wonkwang University , Iksan , Republic of Korea.

The isochroman-type fungal metabolite 3,7-dimethyl-1,8-hydroxy-6-methoxyisochroman (DMHM) was isolated from the extracts of a marine-derived fungal strain of sp. SF-6013. In this study, we investigated the effect of DMHM on inflammatory response. Anti-inflammatory effects of DMHM were examined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells. We observed their anti-inflammatory effects by ELISA, qRT-PCR, and western blot analysis. DMHM revealed that it suppressed the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE), nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and BV2 cells. Furthermore, DMHM decreased the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Therefore, DMHM was further investigated to elucidate the mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory properties; the results indicated that its effect was mediated by the suppression of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK pathways. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory activity of DMHM correlated with its induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 expression via activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that DMHM inhibited several inflammatory pathways including the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, and induced Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression, demonstrating its potential usefulness for treating inflammatory and neuroinflammatory diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08923973.2019.1608559DOI Listing
April 2019

New preaustinoids from a marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-5497 and their inhibitory effects against PTP1B activity.

J Antibiot (Tokyo) 2019 08 24;72(8):629-633. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan, 54538, Republic of Korea.

Chemical investigation of the marine-derived fungal isolate Penicillium sp. SF-5497 resulted in the isolation of two new preaustinoid-related meroterpenoids, named preaustinoid A6 (1) and preaustinoid A7 (2), along with three known metabolites (3-5). Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses, such as 1D and 2D NMR and MS data. Among these, compounds 1 and 3 inhibited PTP1B activity in a dose-dependent manner, with IC values of 17.6 and 58.4 µM, respectively. Furthermore, kinetic analyses indicated that compound 1 inhibited PTP1B in a noncompetitive manner, with the K value of 17.0 µM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41429-019-0187-7DOI Listing
August 2019

antioxidant activity of mackerel () muscle protein hydrolysate.

PeerJ 2018 21;6:e6181. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Seafood Research Center, IACF, Silla University, Busan, Republic of Korea.

Pacific chub mackerel () is an important fish throughout the world, especially in East Asian countries, including Korea, China, and Japan. Protein hydrolysates from marine sources are commonly used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in the food, beverage, and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants isolated from fish are relatively easy to prepare, are cost effective, and have no reported side effects. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the antioxidant activities of mackerel muscle protein hydrolysate (MMPH) prepared using Protamex. The bioactivities of MMPH were investigated in alcoholic fatty liver mice (C57BL/6). Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were comparable in test and control mice, whereas serum triglyceride and lipid peroxidation levels significantly ( < 0.05;  < 0.001) decreased after administration of MMPH (100-500 mg kg), especially at a concentration of 100 mg kg. A significant ( < 0.05) reduction in xanthine oxidase activity was observed in all groups treated with MMPH (100-500 mg kg), as compared with the control group. Significantly ( < 0.05) higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity/protein expression and regulated catalase (CAT) activity/protein expression levels were observed in groups administered MMPH (100-500 mg kg), especially at a concentration of 100 mg kg. These results show that the abundant amino acids of play an important role in the cytosol of the liver cells by directly participating in the expression of xanthine oxidase and the detoxifying SOD and CAT proteins, thereby enhancing antioxidant ability and ultimately, inhibiting lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrated that muscle protein hydrolysate from has strong antioxidant activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.6181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6305115PMC
December 2018

Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from a marine-derived fungal strain sp. SF-5929.

Nat Prod Res 2020 Mar 16;34(5):675-682. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Republic of Korea.

In the course of our continuing investigation of bioactive secondary metabolites from marine-derived fungal strains, a racemate of a novel diphenolic derivative named (±)-tylopilusin D () along with ten previously known secondary metabolites () were isolated from a marine-derived fungal strain sp. SF-5929. Their structures were elucidated mainly by analysis of NMR and MS data. In addition, the inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity were evaluated, and compounds , , and inhibited PTP1B activity with IC values ranging from 3.3 to 8.1 µM. Kinetics studies suggested that compounds , , and had noncompetitive inhibitory effects against PTP1B.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2018.1499629DOI Listing
March 2020

Effect of superheated steam roasting with hot smoking treatment on improving physicochemical properties of the adductor muscle of pen shell ().

Food Sci Nutr 2018 Jul 24;6(5):1317-1327. Epub 2018 May 24.

Seafood Research Center IACF Silla University Seo-gu Busan Korea.

The adductor muscle of the pen shell (AMPS) is a popular protein-enriched food item in Asian Pacific countries, and has only been marketed in the frozen condition, as a result browning and decreased sensory attributes occur. To overcome these problems, superheated steam roasting (at 270°C for 4 min) combined with the hot smoke (10 min) using a selective Oak sawdust was employed to develop a new AMPS product yielding high physicochemical properties during storage periods (0-13 days) especially at 10°C. The processed AMPS showed high sensory preferences because of good odor, color, and textural properties. It also significantly inhibited bacterial growth, volatile basic nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species, and pH changes, and eventually possessed higher nutritional composition with low trimethylamine N-oxide level. Results indicate that saturated steam allows AMPS at good physicochemical conditions, whereas hot smoke-derived aroma compounds prolong its shelf life through antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.674DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060899PMC
July 2018

Furanoaustinol and 7-acetoxydehydroaustinol: new meroterpenoids from a marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-5497.

J Antibiot (Tokyo) 2018 06 20;71(6):557-563. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan, 54538, Republic of Korea.

Two new meroterpenoid-type fungal metabolites, furanoaustinol (1) and 7-acetoxydehydroaustinol (2), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of a marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-5497, along with eight (3-10) known meroterpenoids. Their structures were elucidated mainly based on the analysis of their NMR (1D and 2D) and MS data. Particularly, the novel meroterpenoid, furanoaustinol (1), belonging to the austin group, was identified to possess an unprecedented hexacyclic ring system. Biological evaluation of these compounds revealed that furanoaustinol (1) weakly inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in a dose-dependent manner with an IC value of 77.2 μM. In addition, 7-acetoxydehydroaustinol (2) and four other known meroterpenoids (5, 7, 9, and 10) weakly suppressed the overproduction of nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide-challenged BV2 microglial cells with IC values of 61.0, 30.1, 58.3, 37.6, and 40.2 μM, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41429-018-0034-2DOI Listing
June 2018

Anti-neuroinflammatory effect of 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin, a metabolite from a marine-derived fungal strain Aspergillus sp., via upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

Neurochem Int 2018 02 22;113:8-22. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

In the course of searching for anti-neuroinflammatory metabolites from marine-derived fungi, three fungal metabolites, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin, 6,8-di-O-methylaverufin, and 5-methoxysterigmatocystin were isolated from a marine-derived fungal strain Aspergillus sp. SF-6796. Among these, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 protein in BV2 microglial cells. The induction of HO-1 protein was mediated by the activation of nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), and was regulated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathways. Furthermore, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin suppressed the overproduction of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide, prostaglandin E, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. These anti-neuroinflammatory effects were mediated through the negative regulation of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway, repressing the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor kappa B-α, translocation into the nucleus of p65/p50 heterodimer, and DNA-binding activity of p65 subunit. The anti-neuroinflammatory effect of 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin was partially blocked by a selective HO-1 inhibitor, suggesting that its anti-neuroinflammatory effect is at least partly mediated by HO-1 induction. In this study, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin also induced HO-1 protein expression in primary microglial cells, and this correlated with anti-neuroinflammatory effects observed in LPS-stimulated primary microglial cells. In conclusion, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methylaverantin represents a potential candidate for use in the development of therapeutic agents for the regulation of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuint.2017.11.010DOI Listing
February 2018

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Curvularin-Type Metabolites from a Marine-Derived Fungal Strain Penicillium sp. SF-5859 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced RAW264.7 Macrophages.

Mar Drugs 2017 Sep 2;15(9). Epub 2017 Sep 2.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Korea.

Chemical study on the extract of a marine-derived fungal strain sp. SF-5859 yielded a new curvularin derivative (), along with eight known curvularin-type polyketides (-). The structures of these metabolites (-) were established by comprehensive spectroscopic analyses, including 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). In vitro anti-inflammatory effects of these metabolites were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Among these metabolites, - were shown to strongly inhibit LPS-induced overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) with IC values ranging from 1.9 μM to 18.1 μM, and from 2.8 μM to 18.7 μM, respectively. In the further evaluation of signal pathways involved in these effects, the most active compound, (10,15)-10,11-dehydrocurvularin () attenuated the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, compound was shown to suppress the upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines via the inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, but not through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Based on the comparisons of the different magnitude of the anti-inflammatory effects of these structurally-related metabolites, it was suggested that the opening of the 12-membered lactone ring in curvularin-type metabolites and blocking the phenol functionality led to the significant decrease in their anti-inflammatory activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md15090282DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618421PMC
September 2017

Draft genome sequence of the halophilic KTB 131 isolated from Topan salt of the Jeon-nam in Korea.

Genom Data 2017 Dec 23;14:18-20. Epub 2017 Jul 23.

Major in Food Biotechnology and The Research Center for Extremophiles & Marine Microbiology, Silla University, Busan 46958, South Korea.

The draft genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium KTB 131, isolated from Topan salt of the Jeon-nam in Korea, was established. The genome comprises 4,151,649 bp, with a G + C content of 41.6%. The strain displays a high number of genes responsible for secondary metabolite biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism compared to other bacterial genus members. Numerous genes responsible for various transport systems, solute accumulation, and aromatic/sulfur decomposition were detected. The first genomic analysis encourages further research on comparative genomics and potential biotechnological applications. The whole draft genome sequence of KTB 131 is now available (Bioproject PRJNA380285).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gdata.2017.07.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5554927PMC
December 2017

Isolation and structure determination of a new diketopiperazine dimer from marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp. SF-5280.

Nat Prod Res 2018 Jan 3;32(2):214-221. Epub 2017 Jul 3.

a College of Pharmacy , Wonkwang University , Iksan , Republic of Korea.

A new diketopiperazine dimer designated as SF5280-415 (1) was isolated from an EtOAc extract of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp. SF-5280 by various chromatographic methods. The structure of 1 was mainly determined by analysis of the NMR spectroscopic data and MS data, along with Marfey's method. This compound is a new diastereoisomer of known bispyrrolidinoindoline diketopiperazine alkaloid WIN 64745, which possesses unique architecture biosynthetically derived from an indole oxidation reaction of tryptophan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2017.1346642DOI Listing
January 2018

Penicillospirone from a marine isolate of Penicillium sp. (SF-5292) with anti-inflammatory activity.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2017 08 23;27(15):3516-3520. Epub 2017 May 23.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Chemical investigation of the EtOAc extract of a marine-derived fungal isolate Penicillium sp. SF-5292 yielded a new polyketide-type metabolite, penicillospirone (1). The structure of 1 was determined by analysis of spectroscopic data such as 1D and 2D NMR spectra and MS data, and the final structure including absolute configuration was unambiguously established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the evaluation of its anti-inflammatory effects, 1 inhibited the overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E (PGE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and BV2 microglia, and these inhibitory effects were correlated with the suppressive effect of 1 against overexpressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Furthermore, 1 also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12. Overall, the anti-inflammatory effect of 1 was suggested to be mediated through the negative regulation of NF-κB pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2017.05.066DOI Listing
August 2017

Diversity of Extremely Halophilic Archaeal and Bacterial Communities from Commercial Salts.

Front Microbiol 2017 10;8:799. Epub 2017 May 10.

Major in Food Biotechnology, Division of Bioindustry, Silla UniversityBusan, South Korea.

Salting is one of the oldest food preservation techniques. However, salt is also the source of living halophilic microorganisms that may affect human health. In order to determine the microbial communities of commercial salts, an investigation were done using amplicon sequencing approach in four commercial salts: Ethiopian Afdera salt (EAS), Ethiopian rock salt (ERS), Korean Jangpan salt (KJS), and Korean Topan salt (KTS). Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using a Roche 454 instrument. The results indicated that these microbial communities contained 48.22-61.4% Bacteria, 37.72-51.26% Archaea, 0.51-0.86% Eukarya, and 0.005-0.009% unclassified reads. Among bacteria, the communities in these salts were dominated by the phyla , and . Of the archaea, 91.58% belonged to the class , whereas the remaining 7.58, 0.83, and 0.01% were , and , respectively. This comparison of microbial diversity in salts from two countries showed the presence of many archaeal and bacterial genera that occurred in salt samples from one country but not the other. The bacterial genera and were found only in Korean and Ethiopian salts, respectively. This study indicated the occurrence and diversity of halophilic bacteria and archaea in commercial salts that could be important in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00799DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5423978PMC
May 2017

Anti-inflammatory effects of secondary metabolites isolated from the marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-5629.

Arch Pharm Res 2017 Mar 10;40(3):328-337. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan, 54538, Republic of Korea.

After the chemical investigation of the ethyl acetate extract of the marine-derived fungal strain Penicillium sp. SF-5629, the isolation and structural elucidation of eight secondary metabolites, including (3R,4S)-6,8-dihydroxy-3,4,7-trimethylisocoumarin (1), (3S,4S)-sclerotinin A (2), penicitrinone A (3), citrinin H1 (4), emodin (5), ω-hydroxyemodin (6), 8-hydroxy-6-methyl-9-oxo-9H-xanthene-1-carboxylate (7), and 3,8-dihydroxy-6-methyl-9-oxo-9H-xanthene-1-carboxylate (8) were carried out. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of these metabolites showed that 4 inhibited nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglia, with IC values of 8.1 ± 1.9 and 8.0 ± 2.8 μM, respectively. The inhibitory function of 4 was confirmed based on decreases in inducible nitric oxide synthesis and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression. In addition, 4 was found to suppress the phosphorylation of inhibitor kappa B-α, interrupt the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B, and decrease the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12272-017-0890-5DOI Listing
March 2017

Draft genome sequence of the extremely halophilic Halorubrum sp. SAH-A6 isolated from rock salts of the Danakil depression, Ethiopia.

Genom Data 2016 Dec 30;10:30-2. Epub 2016 Aug 30.

Major in Food Biotechnology and The Research Center for Extremophiles & Marine Microbiology, Silla University, Busan 46958, Republic of Korea.

The draft genome sequence of Halorubrum sp. SAH-A6, isolated from commercial rock salts of the Danakil depression, Ethiopia. The genome comprised 3,325,770 bp, with the G + C content of 68.0%. The strain has many genes which are responsible for secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism as compared to other Halorubrum archaea members. Abundant genes responsible for numerous transport systems, solute accumulation, and aromatic/sulfur decomposition were detected. The first genomic analysis encourages further research on comparative genomics, and biotechnological applications. The NCBI accession number for this genome is SAMN04278861 and ID: 4278861 and strain deposited with accession number KCTC 43215.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gdata.2016.08.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5024332PMC
December 2016

Anti-Inflammatory and Cytoprotective Effects of TMC-256C1 from Marine-Derived Fungus Aspergillus sp. SF-6354 via up-Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Murine Hippocampal and Microglial Cell Lines.

Int J Mol Sci 2016 Apr 8;17(4):529. Epub 2016 Apr 8.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan 54538, Korea.

In the course of searching for bioactive secondary metabolites from marine fungi, TMC-256C1 was isolated from an ethyl acetate extract of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus sp. SF6354. TMC-256C1 displayed anti-neuroinflammatory effect in BV2 microglial cells induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as well as neuroprotective effect against glutamate-stimulated neurotoxicity in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. TMC-256C1 was shown to develop a cellular resistance to oxidative damage caused by glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HT22 cells, and suppress the inflammation process in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. Furthermore, the neuroprotective and anti-neuroinflammatory activities of TMC-256C1 were associated with upregulated expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in HT22 and BV2 cells. We also found that TMC-256C1 activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathways in HT22 and BV2 cells. These results demonstrated that TMC-256C1 activates HO-1 protein expression, probably by increasing nuclear Nrf2 levels via the activation of the p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms17040529DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4848985PMC
April 2016

Anti-neuroinflammatory effects of citreohybridonol involving TLR4-MyD88-mediated inhibition of NF-кB and MAPK signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 cells.

Neurochem Int 2016 May 25;95:55-62. Epub 2015 Dec 25.

College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Iksan, 570-749, Republic of Korea; Hanbang Body-Fluid Research Center, Wonkwang University, Iksan, 570-749, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

In the course of searching for anti-neuroinflammatory metabolites from marine fungi, citreohybridonol was isolated from marine-derived fungal strain Toxicocladosporium sp. SF-5699. Citreohybridonol inhibited production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in BV2 cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Citreohybridonol also suppressed the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and other pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the LPS-stimulated cells. In the further study, citreohybridonol disturbed nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of the inhibitor kappa B-α (IκB-α). Citreohybridonol also had inhibitory effect on the LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Finally, citreohybridonol suppressed the protein expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) in LPS-induced BV2 cells. These results suggest that citreohybridonol has anti-neuroinflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells by modulating TLR4-mediated several inflammatory pathways such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuint.2015.12.010DOI Listing
May 2016

Dihydroisocoumarin Derivatives from Marine-Derived Fungal Isolates and Their Anti-inflammatory Effects in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BV2 Microglia.

J Nat Prod 2015 Dec 14;78(12):2948-55. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Institute of Pharmaceutical Research and Development, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University , Iksan 570-749, Republic of Korea.

Chemical investigation of the EtOAc extracts of marine-derived fungal isolates Aspergillus sp. SF-5974 and Aspergillus sp. SF-5976 yielded a new dihydroisocoumarin derivative (1) and 12 known metabolites. The structures of the isolated metabolites were established by extensive spectroscopic analyses, including 1D and 2D NMR spectra and MS data. Among the metabolites, the absolute configuration of 5'-hydroxyasperentin (6) was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The in vitro antineuroinflammatory effects of the metabolites were also evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cells. Among the isolated metabolites, dihydroisocoumarin derivatives 1-6 (10-80 μM) were shown to inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia. Further, 1 (20-80 μM) was found to suppress the phosphorylation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-α (IκB-α), interrupt the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and decrease the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.5b00614DOI Listing
December 2015
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