Publications by authors named "Jae Deok Kim"

6 Publications

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Deciphering the Relationship Between Cycloheximides Structures and Their Different Biological Activities.

Front Microbiol 2021 7;12:644853. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Institute of Environmentally Friendly Agriculture, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, South Korea.

species are the most important sources of antibacterial, antifungal, and phytotoxic metabolites. In this study, cycloheximide (CH) and acetoxycycloheximide (ACH) were isolated from the fermentation broth of sp. JCK-6092. The antifungal and phytotoxic activities of the two compounds (CH and ACH) and a cycloheximide derivative, hydroxycycloheximide (HCH), were compared. CH exhibited the strongest antagonistic activity against all the true fungi tested, followed by ACH and HCH. However, both CH and ACH displayed similar mycelial growth inhibitory activities against several phytopathogenic oomycetes, and both were more active than that of HCH. Disparate to antifungal ability, ACH showed the strongest phytotoxic activity against weeds and crops, followed by HCH and CH. ACH caused chlorophyll content loss, leaf electrolytic leakage, and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. Its phytotoxicity was stronger than that of glufosinate-ammonium but weaker than that of paraquat in the experiments. CH and its derivatives are well-known protein synthesis inhibitors; however, the precise differences between their mechanism of action remain undiscovered. A computational study revealed effects of CHs on the protein synthesis of (oomycetes), (true fungus), and (plant) and deciphered the differences in their biological activities on different targets. The binding energies and conformation stabilities of each chemical molecule correlated with their biological activities. Thus, molecular docking study supported the experimental results. This is the first comparative study to suggest the ribosomal protein alteration mechanisms of CHs in plants and fungi and to thus show how the protein inhibitory activities of the different derivatives are altered using molecular docking. The correlation of structures features of CHs in respect to bond formation with desired protein was revealed by density functional theory. Overall collective results suggested that CHs can be used as lead molecules in the development of more potent fungicides and herbicides molecules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2021.644853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8058199PMC
April 2021

Herbicidal Characteristics and Structural Identification of the Potential Active Compounds from sp. KRA17-580.

J Agric Food Chem 2020 Dec 21;68(52):15373-15380. Epub 2020 Dec 21.

Eco-friendly and New Materials Research Group, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 34114, Korea.

Weeds are notorious plant species exhibiting a harmful impact on crops. Biological weed control is an efficient and environmentally friendly technique, usually constitutes naturally derived compounds, including bioherbicidal metabolites produced by sp. The isolation and structural identification of phytotoxic compounds from have recently been proposed as an effective way to the discovery of novel bioherbicides. In the screening of bioherbicidal agents, isolated strain KRA17-580 demonstrated significant phytotoxic activity against . Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence indicated that isolated KRA17-580 is similar to . The bacterial culture conditions were optimized for temperature, agitation, and initial pH. strain KRA17-580 showed intense phytotoxic activity and high cell mass at an initial pH of 5.5-7.0, more than 150 rpm, and 25-30 °C. The herbicidal compounds isolated from the culture filtrate of strain KRA17-580 were purified by solvent partition, C, Sephadex LH20 column chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. By 1D-NMR, 2D-NMR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis, the 580-H1 and 580-H2 compounds were identified as a cinnoline-4-carboxamide (, 173.0490; CHNO) and cinnoline-4-carboxylic acid (, 174.0503; CHNO), respectively. Only these two herbicidal compounds showed strong phytotoxic activity against in foliar applications. However, compound 580-H2 was more phytotoxic than 580-H1 and the toxicity was dose-dependent. The herbicidal metabolite KRA17-580 produced by sp. is a new bioherbicidal candidate that may provide a new lead molecule for more efficient phytotoxic compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.0c01974DOI Listing
December 2020

Phylogenetic analysis and inflow route of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Bemisia tabaci in Korea.

Mol Cells 2010 Nov 14;30(5):467-76. Epub 2010 Oct 14.

Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440-746, Korea.

Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a member of the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae, members of which are characterized by closed circular single-stranded DNA genomes of 2.7-2.8 kb in length, and include viruses transmitted by the Bemisia tabaci whitefly. No reports of TYLCV in Korea are available prior to 2008, after which TYLCV spread rapidly to most regions of the southern Korean peninsula (Gyeongsang-Do, Jeolla-Do and Jeju-Do). Fifty full sequences of TYLCV were analyzed in this study, and the AC1, AV1, IR, and full sequences were analyzed via the muscle program and bayesian analysis. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the Korea TYLCVs were divided into two subgroups. The TYLCV Korea 1 group (Masan) originated from TYLCV Japan (Miyazaki) and the TYLCV Korea 2 group (Jeju/Jeonju) from TYLCV Japan (Tosa/Haruno). A B. tabaci phylogenetic tree was constructed with 16S rRNA and mitochondria cytochrome oxidase I (MtCOI) sequences using the muscle program and MEGA 4.0 in the neighbor-joining algorithm. The sequence data of 16S rRNA revealed that Korea B. tabaci was closely aligned to B. tabaci isolated in Iran and Nigeria. The Q type of B. tabaci, which was originally identified as a viruliferous insect in 2008, was initially isolated in Korea as a non-viruliferous insect in 2005. Therefore, we suggest that two TYLCV Japan isolates were introduced to Korea via different routes, and then transmitted by native B. tabaci.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10059-010-0143-7DOI Listing
November 2010

Do acute changes in heart rate by isoproterenol affect aortic stiffness in patients with hypertension?

Korean J Intern Med 2004 Mar;19(1):33-7

Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea.

Background: Increased aortic stiffness is a independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease in patients with hypertension. Acute changes of the heart rate (HR) have been reported not to affect the aortic stiffness in pacing. However, it is unknown whether acute changes in HR caused by sympathomimetics can affect the aortic stiffness in patients with hypertension. We investigated the effect of acute changes in HR produced by isoproterenol on the aortic stiffness in 17 hypertensive patientss (mean age: 59 +/- 9 years).

Methods: All vasoactive drugs were discontinued at least 3 days before the study. The carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured by the foot-to-foot method. The pulse waves were recorded at the baseline and at every increase of HR by 5 to 10 bpm with a gradual increase of the dose of isoproterenol. The blood pressures and HR were measured simultaneously. For the analysis, HR, PWV, compliance (C), and compliance index (Ci) were converted as percent changes (delta) from the baseline values. Percent changes of the parameters of the aortic stiffness, i.e., deltaPWV, deltaC, and deltaCi, were grouped by every 10% increase in deltaHR.

Results: There was no significant difference among groups in deltaPWV, deltaC and deltaCi (p > 0.05 for each of the group). The regression analysis showed no significant correlation of deltaHR with deltaPWV and deltaC (r = 0.18, 0.13 respectively, p > 0.05 for each). deltaCi had a poor correlation with deltaHR (r = 0.22, p < 0.05). However, only 4.6% of deltaCi could be referred to deltaHR (r2 = 0.046).

Conclusion: Aortic stiffness was not affected by acute changes in HR produced by isoproterenol which suggests that it is not necessary to consider acute changes in HR when measuring aortic PWV.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4531553PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3904/kjim.2004.19.1.33DOI Listing
March 2004

The resistance mechanisms of b-lactam antimicrobials in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

Korean J Intern Med 2002 Jun;17(2):94-9

Dept. of Int. Medicine, Dankook University, College of Medicine, San 29, Anseo-dong, Chonan, Chungnam, Korea 330-715.

Background: Despite increasing importance of Acinetobacter baumannii in nosocomial infections and rapid development of multi-antimicrobial resistance in this strain, the resistance mechanisms of beta-lactam antimicrobials in A. baumannii were not clearly defined. In order to observe the resistance mechanisms against beta-lactams and carbapenem, we characterized the production of beta-lactamases and outermembrane protein (OMP) profiles for the 44 clinical isolates of A. baumannii.

Methods: The MICs of antimicrobials were determined by agar dilution test. The secondary beta-lactamases were characterized by isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reactions and nucleotide sequencing, and the production of chromosomal beta-lactamases was quantitated by spectrophotometric method. For two strains with an elevated MIC of carbapenem, outermembrane protein (OMP) profile was analyzed by ultracentrifugation of the sonicated bacteral cells and SDS-PAGE.

Results And Conclusion: Twenty two or 4 of 44 strains produced TEM-1-like beta-lactamase or PER-1 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, respectively. However, when we analyzed the MICs of several beta-lactams with the beta-lactamase production, the resistance level of beta-lactam was mainly determined by the production of chromosomal beta-lactamase, not by the secondary beta-lactamases in the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In two strains with an elevated MIC of imipenem, a decrease or loss of about 35 kDa and 22 kDa proteins in OMP was observed, which suggested that the change of OMP played a role in carbapenem resistance.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4531663PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3904/kjim.2002.17.2.94DOI Listing
June 2002