Publications by authors named "Jady J Rugg"

4 Publications

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Efficacy and safety of a combination of selamectin plus sarolaner for the treatment and prevention of flea infestations and the treatment of ear mites in cats presented as veterinary patients in the United States.

Vet Parasitol 2019 Jun 4;270 Suppl 1:S3-S11. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Zoetis, Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, 333 Portage Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan, 49007, USA.

Two randomised, single-masked, multi-center field studies were conducted in the United States in cats presented as veterinary patients. The first study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a topically applied formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner (Revolution Plus/Stronghold Plus, Zoetis) against natural flea infestations; the second study evaluated its efficacy against natural ear mite infestations. The product was administered topically by the cats' owners at the dose range provided in the market product of 6.0-12.0 mg selamectin and 1.0-2.0 mg sarolaner per kg bodyweight. Imidacloprid plus moxidectin (Advantage Multi for Cats, Bayer) was used as a positive control in both studies at the label dosage. In the flea study, treatments were administered on Days 0, 30, and 60. Efficacy was calculated based on the mean percent reduction of live flea counts on Days 30, 60, and 90 relative to the pre-treatment count. In the ear mite study, a single treatment was applied on Day 0 and efficacy was determined on Days 14 and 30 based on the presence or absence of ear mites. In both studies, patients were randomly allocated to treatments in the ratio of 2:1, selamectin plus sarolaner: imidacloprid plus moxidectin. In the two studies, 405 cats received treatment with selamectin plus sarolaner; of these, 256 cats received three monthly treatments in the flea study. There were no serious adverse reactions to treatment with selamectin plus sarolaner; health issues noted were typical of the normal ailments or minor traumatic injuries expected in the general cat population and were similar in both treatment groups. Efficacy against fleas based on geometric (arithmetic) means was 97.2% (95.9%), 99.5% (99.4%), and 99.8% (99.8%) in the selamectin plus sarolaner group and was 79.7% (70.5%), 91.4% (77.3%), and 95.5% (87.4%) in the imidacloprid plus moxidectin group on Days 30, 60, and 90, respectively. Flea counts for the selamectin plus sarolaner group were significantly lower than the counts for the imidacloprid plus moxidectin group at all time-points after treatment administration on Day 0 (P <  0.001). Treatment reduced the clinical signs of flea allergy dermatitis (alopecia, dermatitis/pyodermatitis, erythema, pruritus, scaling, and papules) in affected cats by 86.7%-100% in the selamectin plus sarolaner group and by 66.7%-100% in the imidacloprid plus moxidectin group. In the ear mite study, a single application of selamectin plus sarolaner resulted in the clearance of mites from 87.5% of cats within 14 days and 94.4% of cats within 30 days of treatment. The respective percentages of mite-free cats in the imidacloprid plus moxidectin group were 64.0% and 72.0%. There were significantly more cats with no mites noted in the selamectin plus sarolaner group than in the imidacloprid plus moxidectin group on Day 14 and Day 30 (P ≤  0.018). Selamectin plus sarolaner (Revolution Plus/Stronghold Plus) administered topically at monthly intervals for three months was well tolerated and highly effective for the treatment and prevention of natural infestations of fleas on cats presented as veterinary patients. Clinical signs of flea allergy dermatitis improved in affected cats following treatment administration. A single topical treatment was also safe and highly effective for the treatment of ear mite infestations in naturally infested cats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2018.11.009DOI Listing
June 2019

Efficacy and safety of a new topical formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner in the treatment and control of natural infections of Ancylostoma tubaeforme and Toxocara cati in cats presented as veterinary patients in the United States.

Vet Parasitol 2019 Jun 11;270 Suppl 1:S45-S51. Epub 2018 Nov 11.

Zoetis, Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, 333 Portage Street, Kalamazoo, MI, 49007, USA.

A new topical formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner (Revolution Plus/Stronghold Plus, Zoetis) was evaluated in the treatment and control of naturally occurring infections of Ancylostoma tubaeforme and Toxocara cati in cats presented as veterinary patients in the United States. Three thousand three hundred three (3303) cats were screened in 25 veterinary practices in 15 states and 153 hookworm-positive cats (A. tubaeforme and/or A. braziliense), mainly from Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, and Hawaii, were identified; 135 cats met all the criteria for enrollment and were included on study. The cats were randomly assigned to treatment with Revolution (at the label dosage, to provide a minimum dosage of 6 mg/kg selamectin) or selamectin plus sarolaner (at a dosage of 6-12 mg/kg plus 1-2 mg/kg, respectively). Treatments were administered at the time of enrollment and repeated 30 days later. Fecal samples were collected for differential fecal egg count prior to the first treatment (Day 0), prior to the second treatment (Day 30), and approximately 30 days later (Day 60). Efficacy was based on the percentage reductions in geometric mean fecal egg count for A. tubaeforme on Day 30 and Day 60 compared with Day 0. Where cats were co-infected with T. cati, efficacy against this species was also evaluated. Efficacy data were evaluated for A. tubaeforme for 40 cats on both Day 30 and Day 60 for the group treated with the selamectin/sarolaner combination and reductions in geometric mean fecal egg counts of 99.4% and 99.7% were demonstrated for Day 30 and Day 60, respectively. For the group treated with selamectin alone, 44 and 40 cats were evaluated and percent reductions for Day 30 and Day 60 were 99.5% and 99.9%, respectively. For T. cati, 14 cats were evaluated in the selamectin/sarolaner-treated group for Day 30 and for Day 60, and the reduction in geometric mean fecal egg count was 100% for both days. There were 11 and 9 cats evaluated for Day 30 and Day 60, respectively, for the selamectin-treated group and the reduction was again 100% for both days. The geometric mean fecal egg counts post-treatment were significantly lower than pre-treatment for both A. tubaeforme and T. cati, for both treatments, and for both periods of interest (P < 0.0001). No serious adverse events related to treatment with either product occurred during the study. Thus, both selamectin alone and the combination product of selamectin/sarolaner were safe and effective when administered on a monthly basis for the treatment and control of natural infections of A. tubaeforme and T. cati. The addition of sarolaner to the formulation did not interfere with the efficacy of selamectin against these nematodes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2018.10.012DOI Listing
June 2019

Efficacy of a topical formulation of selamectin plus sarolaner against induced infestations of Amblyomma americanum on cats and prevention of Cytauxzoon felis transmission.

Vet Parasitol 2019 Jun 11;270 Suppl 1:S31-S37. Epub 2018 Nov 11.

Zoetis, Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, Kalamazoo, MI 49007, USA.

Cytauxzoonosis, caused by infection with Cytauxzoon felis, is the most severe tick-borne disease of cats. The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of selamectin (6.0 mg/kg) plus sarolaner (1.0 mg/kg) formulated in combination (Revolution® Plus / Stronghold Plus, Zoetis) applied topically once a month on cats for three months against induced infestations of Amblyomma americanum adults and to evaluate the effectiveness of the product in preventing the transmission of C. felis. This study was conducted in two phases. Sixteen cats were dosed with selamectin/sarolaner or a placebo (vehicle control) on Days 0, 28, and 56. In phase 1, each cat was infested with 50 (±5) unfed adult A. americanum on Day 4 and tick counts were conducted on Day 6 (48 h post infestation) and Day 7 (72 h post infestation) to evaluate acaricidal efficacy. In phase 2, to confirm acaricidal efficacy and evaluate prevention of C. felis transmission, each cat was infested on Day 60 with 50 (±5) adult A. americanum acquisition fed as nymphs on two C. felis-infected donor cats. Tick counts were conducted on Day 62 (48 h post infestation) and Day 63 (72 h post infestation). Blood samples were collected on Days -9, 60, 70, 76, and 90 and tested for infection with C. felis. Placebo cats were adequately infested on all count days, with least squares (geometric) mean live tick counts ranging from 34.0 (28.8) to 46.1 (46.0). Treatment reduced the least squares (geometric) mean counts compared to placebo by 27.1 (32.1)% and 90.4 (96.8)% on Days 6 and 7, respectively. The corresponding percent reductions were 56.4 (60.6)% and 94.7 (97.3)% on Days 62 and 63, respectively. Least squares mean counts were significantly lower in the treated group compared with the placebo group on all count days (P ≤ 0.0286). All cats were negative for C. felis by PCR prior to study start. In phase 2, seven cats in the control group and no cats in the selamectin/sarolaner group became infected with C. felis (P = 0.0017). Topical treatment with selamectin/sarolaner was >90% effective in reducing A. americanum tick counts 72 h after infestation and prevented the transmission of C. felis from infected ticks following the third of three monthly treatments. Revolution Plus / Stronghold Plus offers an option for the control of A. americanum infestations on cats and for preventing the transmission of C. felis to cats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2018.10.018DOI Listing
June 2019

Efficacy of a novel oral formulation of sarolaner (Simparica™) against five common tick species infesting dogs in the United States.

Vet Parasitol 2016 May 28;222:28-32. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Zoetis, Veterinary Medicine Research and Development, 333 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI 49007 USA.

The efficacy of a single oral treatment with sarolaner (Simparica™, Zoetis), a novel isoxazoline compound, was evaluated against five tick species known to infest dogs in the United States. A total of 10 laboratory studies, two against each species, were conducted using adult purpose-bred mongrels or Beagle dogs. In each study, 16 dogs were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups based on pre-treatment host-suitability tick counts. Dogs were infested with approximately 50 unfed adult Amblyomma americanum, Amblyomma maculatum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis or Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days -2, 5, 12, 19, 26 and 33. On Day 0, dogs were treated with a placebo or a sarolaner tablet providing a minimum dose of 2 mg/kg. Tick counts were conducted 48h after treatment and after each subsequent weekly re-infestation. There were no treatment-related adverse reactions during any of the studies. Dogs in the placebo-treated group maintained tick infestations throughout the studies. Geometric mean live tick counts were significantly lower (P≤0.0001) in the sarolaner-treated group compared to the tick counts in the placebo group at all timepoints. Treatment with sarolaner resulted in ≥99.6% efficacy against existing infestations of all five tick species within 48h. The efficacy against weekly post-treatment re-infestations of all tick species was ≥96.9% for at least 35 days after treatment. Thus, a single dose of sarolaner administered orally at the minimum dosage of 2mg/kg, resulted in excellent efficacy within 48h against existing tick infestations, and against weekly re-infestations for 35 days after treatment. These studies confirmed that administration of the minimum dose of sarolaner will provide rapid treatment of existing infestations and give at least one month of control against re-infestation by the common tick species affecting dogs in the US.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2015.12.023DOI Listing
May 2016
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