Publications by authors named "Jacqueline Matis"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Maternal employment and socio-economic status of families raising children born very preterm with motor or cognitive impairments: the EPIPAGE cohort study.

Dev Med Child Neurol 2020 10 18;62(10):1182-1190. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Inserm UMR 1153, Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Research Team (Epopé), Centre for Epidemiology and Statistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, DHU Risks in Pregnancy, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.

Aim: To describe maternal employment and the socio-economic status of the household up to 8 years after the very preterm birth of a child, according to the presence and type of motor or cognitive impairment.

Method: A total of 1885 families from the French EPIPAGE cohort of children who were born very preterm between 1997 and 1998 were included. Motor and cognitive impairments were identified in children between the ages of 2 and 8 years in 770 families and were classified according to type. The 1115 families with children born very preterm without these impairments were considered the reference group.

Results: Mothers of children with severe motor or cognitive impairments were less often working at 5 years after the birth than the reference mothers (21% and 30% vs 57%; p<0.001). Those working before birth returned to work less often and those not working started to work less often after the birth than did reference mothers. At 8 years, mothers of children with severe impairments reported financial difficulties more often than mothers of children without impairments.

Interpretation: Despite a fairly protective regulatory framework in France, families of infants born very preterm with severe motor or cognitive impairments are socially underprivileged. Measures to maintain an acceptable standard of living for these families and their children are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14587DOI Listing
October 2020

Survival and morbidity of preterm children born at 22 through 34 weeks' gestation in France in 2011: results of the EPIPAGE-2 cohort study.

JAMA Pediatr 2015 Mar;169(3):230-8

Inserm UMR1153, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Team, Paris, France.

Importance: Up-to-date estimates of the health outcomes of preterm children are needed for assessing perinatal care, informing parents, making decisions about care, and providing evidence for clinical guidelines.

Objectives: To determine survival and neonatal morbidity of infants born from 22 through 34 completed weeks' gestation in France in 2011 and compare these outcomes with a comparable cohort in 1997.

Design, Setting, And Participants: The EPIPAGE-2 study is a national, prospective, population-based cohort study conducted in all maternity and neonatal units in France in 2011. A total of 2205 births (stillbirths and live births) and terminations of pregnancy at 22 through 26 weeks' gestation, 3257 at 27 through 31 weeks, and 1234 at 32 through 34 weeks were studied. Cohort data were collected from January 1 through December 31, 1997, and from March 28 through December 31, 2011. Analyses for 1997 were run for the entire year and then separately for April to December; the rates for survival and morbidities did not differ. Data are therefore presented for the whole year in 1997 and the 8-month and 6-month periods in 2011.

Main Outcomes And Measures: Survival to discharge and survival without any of the following adverse outcomes: grade III or IV intraventricular hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity (stage 3 or higher), or necrotizing enterocolitis (stages 2-3).

Results: A total of 0.7% of infants born before 24 weeks' gestation survived to discharge: 31.2% of those born at 24 weeks, 59.1% at 25 weeks, and 75.3% at 26 weeks. Survival rates were 93.6% at 27 through 31 weeks and 98.9% at 32 through 34 weeks. Infants discharged home without severe neonatal morbidity represented 0% at 23 weeks, 11.6% at 24 weeks, 30.0% at 25 weeks, 47.5% at 26 weeks, 81.3% at 27 through 31 weeks, and 96.8% at 32 through 34 weeks. Compared with 1997, the proportion of infants surviving without severe morbidity in 2011 increased by 14.4% (P < .001) at 25 through 29 weeks and 6% (P < .001) at 30 through 31 weeks but did not change appreciably for those born at less than 25 weeks. The rates of antenatal corticosteroid use, induced preterm deliveries, cesarean deliveries, and surfactant use increased significantly in all gestational-age groups, except at 22 through 23 weeks.

Conclusions And Relevance: The substantial improvement in survival in France for newborns born at 25 through 31 weeks' gestation was accompanied by an important reduction in severe morbidity, but survival remained rare before 25 weeks. Although improvement in survival at extremely low gestational age may be possible, its effect on long-term outcomes requires further studies. The long-term results of the EPIPAGE-2 study will be informative in this regard.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.3351DOI Listing
March 2015

Predictors of the risk of cognitive deficiency in very preterm infants: the EPIPAGE prospective cohort.

Acta Paediatr 2011 Mar 17;100(3):370-8. Epub 2011 Jan 17.

INSERM, UMR S953, Epidemiological Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's and Children's Health, Hôpital Tenon, F-75020, Paris, France.

Aim: To assess cerebral lesions and other medical as well as social characteristics as predictors of risk of mild and severe cognitive deficiencies in very preterm infants.

Methods: As part of the EPIPAGE population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data and cognitive outcome at 5 years of age were recorded for 1503 infants born before 33 weeks of gestation in nine regions of France in 1997. Mild cognitive deficiency was defined as a Mental Processing Composite score on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children test of between 70 and 84, and severe cognitive deficiency as a score of <70.

Results: After controlling for cerebral lesions and other medical as well as social factors, low parental socio-economic status and lack of breastfeeding were significant predictors of mild and severe cognitive deficiencies, whereas presence of cerebral lesions, being small for gestational age and having a large number of siblings were predictors of severe cognitive deficiency.

Conclusion: Predictors of poor cognitive outcome in very preterm infants are low social status, lack of breastfeeding, presence of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, being born small for gestational age and having a high number of siblings. Social factors predicted both mild and severe cognitive deficiencies, whereas medical factors predicted mostly severe cognitive deficiencies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2010.02064.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3080666PMC
March 2011

Predictors of cerebral palsy in very preterm infants: the EPIPAGE prospective population-based cohort study.

Dev Med Child Neurol 2010 Jun 12;52(6):e119-25. Epub 2010 Feb 12.

INSERM, UMR S953, Epidemiological Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's and Children's Health, Hôpital Tenon, and UMPC University Paris, Paris, France.

Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants.

Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data and outcome at 5 years of age were recorded for 1812 infants born before 33 weeks of gestation in nine regions of France in 1997.

Results: The study group comprised 942 males (52%) and 870 females with a mean gestational age of 30 weeks (SD 2 wks; range 24-32 wks) and a mean birthweight of 1367 g (SD 393 g; range 450-2645 g). CP was diagnosed at 5 years of age in 159 infants (prevalence 9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7-10%), 97 males and 62 females, with a mean gestational age of 29 weeks (SD 2 wks; range 24-32 wks) and a mean birthweight of 1305 g (SD 386 g; range 500-2480 g). Among this group, 67% walked without aid, 14% walked with aid, and 19% were unable to walk. Spastic, ataxic, and dyskinetic CP accounted for 89%, 7%, and 4% of cases respectively. The prevalence of CP was 61% among infants with cystic periventricular leukomalacia, 50% in infants with intraparenchymal haemorrhage, 8% in infants with grade I intraventricular haemorrhage, and 4% in infants without a detectable cerebral lesion. After controlling for cerebral lesions and obstetric and neonatal factors, only male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52; 95% CI 1.03-2.25) and preterm premature rupture of membranes or preterm labour (OR 1.72; 95% CI 0.95-3.14) were predictors of the development of CP in very preterm infants.

Interpretation: Cerebral lesions were the most important predictor of CP in very preterm infants. In addition, infant sex and preterm premature rupture of membranes or preterm labour were also independent predictors of CP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03612.xDOI Listing
June 2010

Behavioral problems and cognitive performance at 5 years of age after very preterm birth: the EPIPAGE Study.

Pediatrics 2009 Jun;123(6):1485-92

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U558, 37 Allées Jules Guesde, 31073 Toulouse Cedex, France.

Objectives: We compared the frequency of behavioral problems in very preterm and term children at 5 years of age. We hypothesized that behavioral problems would be associated with cognitive impairment and environmental factors and that differences between the 2 groups would be reduced but persist after adjusting for cognitive performance and environmental factors.

Patients And Methods: The Etude Epidémiologique sur les Petits Ages Gestationnels (EPIPAGE) study was a prospective population-based cohort study that included all births occurring between 22 and 32 weeks' gestation and a control group of infants born at 39 to 40 weeks' gestation in 1997 in 9 French regions. Neonatal and obstetrics data were collected at birth. At 5 years of age, sociodemographic status and neurodevelopmental and cognitive development of the children, as well as maternal mental well-being, were assessed. The behavioral problems of 1102 very preterm and 375 term singletons without major impairments were studied by using the parent-completed Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire.

Results: Parents of very preterm children reported significantly more behavioral problems, with a twofold higher prevalence compared with term children for hyperactivity/inattention, emotional symptoms, and peer problems. Behavioral problems were associated with low cognitive performance, developmental delay, hospitalizations of the child, young maternal age, and poor maternal mental well-being. Very preterm children were still at higher risk of behavioral problems compared with term children after adjustment for cognitive performance and all others factors.

Conclusions: Behavioral problems were strongly related to cognitive impairment, but very preterm children were still at higher risk even after adjusting for cognitive performance. Early screening for behavioral problems should be encouraged for all very preterm children, and maternal well-being should also be the focus of special attention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1216DOI Listing
June 2009

Diagnostic approach to neonatal hypotonia: retrospective study on 144 neonates.

Eur J Pediatr 2008 May 20;167(5):517-23. Epub 2007 Jul 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg Cedex, France.

The objectives of our study were to determine the actual frequency of the different disorders causing neonatal hypotonia and to assess the reliability of the first physical examination as well as the contribution of the main standard diagnostic tests. One hundred and forty-four infants diagnosed with neonatal hypotonia between January 1st 1999 and June 30th 2005 in our tertiary care facility were retrospectively included in the study. Perinatal history, clinical type of hypotonia, results of standard diagnostic tests, final diagnosis and outcome were abstracted from the original charts. A final diagnosis was reached in 120 cases. Central (cerebral) causes represented 82% of the elucidated cases, mostly hypoxic and hemorrhagic lesions of the brain (34%), chromosomal aberrations and syndromic disorders (26%) and brain malformations (12%). Peripheral (neuromuscular) causes were mainly represented by spinal muscular atrophy (6%) and myotonic dystrophy (4%). Positive predictive value of the initial clinical examination was higher in central type hypotonia. Neuroimaging, karyotype analysis and DNA-based tests were the most helpful diagnostic tools. These recent clinical data can be used to improve our strategy in investigating neonatal hypotonia and a diagnostic algorithm is proposed based on our findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-007-0539-3DOI Listing
May 2008

Neonatal and 5-year outcomes after birth at 30-34 weeks of gestation.

Obstet Gynecol 2007 Jul;110(1):72-80

Department of Neonatal Medicine, Rouen University Hospital and Inserm Avenir Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Research, University of Rouen, Rouen, France.

Objective: To evaluate the rates of in-hospital death, neonatal complications, and 5-year outcomes of infants born at 30-34 weeks of gestation.

Methods: In nine regions of France, all 2,020 stillbirths and live births at 30, 31, and 32 weeks in 1997 and all 457 births at 33 and 34 weeks in April and October 1997 were recorded. Survivors were evaluated at 5 years of age.

Results: Increasing gestational age from 30 to 34 weeks was associated with progressive decreases in in-hospital mortality (from 8.1% to 0.4%) and neonatal complications (respiratory distress syndrome, 43.8% to 2.6%; maternofetal infections, 7.2% to 2.6%; and severe white matter injury, 5.5% to 1.3%). Although infants at 33 and 34 weeks of gestation rarely experienced necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or nosocomial infections, they still required endotracheal ventilation, antibiotics, or parenteral nutrition. At 5 years of age, older gestational age was associated with significant decreases in rates of cerebral palsy (6.3% at 30 weeks and 0.7% at 34 weeks) and mild to severe cognitive impairments (35.3% at 30 weeks and 23.9% at 34 weeks). In singletons, preterm rupture of membranes or preterm labor carried an increased risk of cerebral palsy but not of cognitive impairment.

Conclusion: Neonates born at 30-34 weeks experienced substantial morbidity and often required admission to neonatal intensive care units. These outcomes suggest that prolonging pregnancies beyond 34 weeks may be desirable whenever possible. Infants born at 30-34 weeks should be carefully monitored to ensure prompt detection and management of neurodevelopmental impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.AOG.0000267498.95402.bdDOI Listing
July 2007

Improving perinatal regionalization by predicting neonatal intensive care requirements of preterm infants: an EPIPAGE-based cohort study.

Pediatrics 2006 Jul;118(1):84-90

Department of Neonatalogy, Maternite Regionale Universitaire, Nancy, France.

Objective: Perinatal regionalization has been organized into 3 ascending levels of care, fitting increasing degrees of pathology. Current recommendations specify that very premature infants be referred prenatally to level III facilities, yet not all very preterm neonates require level III intensive care. The objective of our study was to determine the antenatal factors that, in association with gestational age, predict the need for neonatal intensive care in preterm infants, to match the size of birth with the level of care required.

Methods: Data were analyzed from a cohort of very preterm infants born in nine French regions in 1997. We defined the need for neonatal intensive care as follows: (1) the requirement for specialized management (mechanical ventilation for >48 hours, high frequency oscillation, or inhaled nitric oxide) or (2) poor outcome (transfer to a level III facility within the first 2 days of life or early neonatal death). Triplet pregnancies and pregnancies marked by fetal malformations or intensive care requirements for the mother before delivery were excluded.

Results: We focused our study on 1262 neonates aged 30, 31 and 32 weeks' gestation, where the need for intensive care was 42.8%, 33.2%, and 22.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for intensive care requirement with low gestational age were twin pregnancies, maternal hypertension, antepartum hemorrhage, infection, and male gender. Antenatal steroid therapy and premature rupture of membranes were protective factors against intensive care requirement.

Conclusion: Infants <31 weeks' gestation should be referred to level III facilities. From 31 weeks' gestation, some infants can be safely handled in level IIb facilities. However, the quality of perinatal regionalization may only be fully assessed by long-term follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-2149DOI Listing
July 2006

Behavioral outcome at 3 years of age in very preterm infants: the EPIPAGE study.

Pediatrics 2006 Jun;117(6):1996-2005

Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's Health, Villejuif, France.

Objectives: Our goal was to compare the prevalence of behavioral problems between very preterm children and term children at 3 years of age and examine the factors associated with behavioral problems in very preterm children.

Methods: We conducted a prospective population-based cohort study: the EPIPAGE (Etude Epidémiologique sur les Petits Ages Gestationnels) study. All infants born between 22 and 32 weeks of gestation in 9 regions of France in 1997 were included and compared with a control group of infants born at term. Sociodemographic status, obstetric, and neonatal data were collected at birth and in the neonatal units. At 3 years of age, the behavioral problems of 1228 very preterm singleton children without major neurodisabilities, and 447 term children were studied using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire completed by the parents.

Results: Very preterm children were more likely than controls to have behavioral difficulties. Among very preterm children, several medical conditions were associated with a high total difficulty score: major neonatal cerebral lesions diagnosed by cranial ultrasonographic studies, hospitalization within the last year, poor health, and psychomotor delay. A high birth order and sociodemographic factors such as young maternal age and low educational level of the mother were also identified as risk factors for behavioral difficulties. The differences between very preterm children and controls remained significant after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, neonatal complications, and neurodevelopmental status, for a high total difficulties score, hyperactivity, conduct problems, and for peer problems. For emotional problems, the difference was at the limit of significance.

Conclusions: Very preterm children have a higher risk of behavioral problems at 3 years of age compared with term-born children. Health and neurodevelopmental status of the child were significantly associated with behavioral difficulties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-2310DOI Listing
June 2006

Congenital hyperekplexia: five sporadic cases.

Eur J Pediatr 2006 Feb 7;165(2):104-7. Epub 2005 Oct 7.

Service de Réanimation Néonatale, Pédiatrie 2, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 avenue Molière, 67098 Strasbourg, France.

Unlabelled: We report fives sporadic cases of hyperekplexia or startle disease characterized by a highly exaggerated startle reflex and tonic attacks. Affected neonates suffer from prolonged periods of stiffness and are at risk for sudden death from apnea. An early diagnosis is needed. Sudden loud sounds, unexpected tactile stimuli or percussion at the base of the nose can also elicit excessive jerking or tonic attack. The diagnosis of hyperekplexia is a purely clinical one. A defect of the alpha1 subunit of inhibitory glycine receptor (GLRA1) has been observed in the dominant form with a mutation in the chromosome 5. Clonazepam is effective and decreases the severity of the symptoms. The disease tends to improve after infancy and the psychomotor development is normal. The major form of "hyperekplexia" should be considered whenever one is confronted with neonatal hypertonicity associated with paroxysmal tonic manifestations (without electroencephalography anomalies).

Conclusion: the diagnosis of hyperekplexia should be evaluated in any neonate with tonic attacks without evident cause.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-005-0015-xDOI Listing
February 2006

Are maternal hypertension and small-for-gestational age risk factors for severe intraventricular hemorrhage and cystic periventricular leukomalacia? Results of the EPIPAGE cohort study.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2005 Jul;193(1):178-84

Inserm U149 Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's Health, Villejuif, France.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between different causes of preterm delivery (eg, maternal hypertension, small-for-gestational age [SGA], other) and cerebral damage (eg, cystic periventricular leukomalacia [c-PVL], grade III intraventricular hemorrhage [IVH], and intra-parenchymal hemorrhage [IPH]).

Study Design: This study included 1902 very preterm singletons who were transferred to neonatal intensive care units in 9 French regions. We used logistic regression models to compare the risk of cerebral injury associated with maternal hypertension, SGA, and all other causes of preterm delivery.

Results: We found that the risk of c-PVL and grade III IVH was higher in infants born after preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) with short latency or idiopathic preterm labor than in infants born to hypertensive mothers. We show that SGA and antepartum maternal hemorrhage significantly increase the risk of IPH.

Conclusion: Our results show that infants born to hypertensive mothers have a lower risk of cerebral injuries than infants born following idiopathic preterm labor and PPROM because they are less exposed to prenatal infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2004.11.057DOI Listing
July 2005

White matter damage and intraventricular hemorrhage in very preterm infants: the EPIPAGE study.

J Pediatr 2003 Oct;143(4):477-83

INSERM U149 Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's Health, 16 Avenue Paul Vaillant Couturier, 94807 Villejuif Cedex, France.

Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of cranial ultrasound abnormalities in very preterm infants as a function of gestational age, plurality, intrauterine growth restriction, and death before discharge.

Study Design: A prospective, population-based cohort of 2667 infants born between 22 and 32 weeks of gestation in 1997 in nine regions of France, transferred to a neonatal intensive care unit, for whom at least one cranial ultrasound scan was available.

Results: The frequencies of white matter damage (WMD), major WMD, cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), periventricular parenchymal hemorrhagic involvement, and intraventricular hemorrhage with ventricular dilatation were 21%, 8%, 5%, 3%, and 3%, respectively. The risk of WMD increased with decreasing gestational age. Mean age at diagnosis of cystic PVL was older for the most premature infants. Intraventricular hemorrhage with ventricular dilatation was associated with a higher risk of cystic PVL. Intrauterine growth restriction was not associated with a lower prevalence of cystic PVL.

Conclusion: The frequency of WMD is high in very preterm babies and is strongly related to gestational age. The incidence of cystic PVL did not differ between babies with intrauterine growth restriction and babies who were appropriate for gestational age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/S0022-3476(03)00417-7DOI Listing
October 2003

Early treatment with erythropoietin beta ameliorates anemia and reduces transfusion requirements in infants with birth weights below 1000 g.

J Pediatr 2002 Jul;141(1):8-15

Objective: To investigate whether recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) reduces the need for transfusion in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants (birth weight 500-999 g) and to determine the optimal time for treatment.

Methods: In a blinded multicenter trial, 219 ELBW infants were randomized on day 3 to one of 3 groups: early rhEPO group (rhEPO from the first week for 9 weeks, n = 74), late rhEPO group (rhEPO from the fourth week for 6 weeks, n = 74), or control group (no rhEPO, n = 71). All infants received enteral iron (3-9 mg/kg/day) from the first week. The rhEPO beta dose was 750 IU/kg/week. Success was defined as no transfusion and hematocrit levels never below 30%.

Results: Success rate was 13% in the early rhEPO group, 11% in the late rhEPO group, and 4% in the control group (P =.026 for early rhEPO versus control group). Median transfusion volume was 0.4 versus 0.5 versus 0.7 mL/kg/day (P =.02) and median donor exposure was 1.0 versus 1.0 versus 2.0 (P =.05) in the early rhEPO group, the late rhEPO group, and the control group, respectively. Infection risk was not increased and weight gain was not delayed with rhEPO beta.

Conclusion: Early rhEPO beta treatment effectively reduces the need for transfusion in ELBW infants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2002.124309DOI Listing
July 2002