Prof. Jacek Nowak, Ph.D. - Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine - Prof.

Prof. Jacek Nowak

Ph.D.

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine

Prof.

Warsaw | Poland

Main Specialties: Medical Genetics

Additional Specialties: immunogenetics

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-3474-7597

Prof. Jacek Nowak, Ph.D. - Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine - Prof.

Prof. Jacek Nowak

Ph.D.

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine - Warsaw , Poland

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Metrics

Number of Publications

47

Publications

Number of Profile Views

577

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

412

Reads

Number of Citations

96

Citations

Education

Jan 1991 - Jan 1992
Central Clinical Hospital MMA
PhD
Jan 2010
Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine
doctor habilitatus, tenured professor

Experience

Jan 2010
Department of Immunogenetics, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine
Professor and Chair

Top co-authors

Krzysztof Warzocha
Krzysztof Warzocha

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine

10
Anna Gronkowska
Anna Gronkowska

Medical University of Warsaw

7
Andrzej Hellmann
Andrzej Hellmann

Medical University of Gdansk

6
Andrzej Lange
Andrzej Lange

L. Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy

6
Katarzyna Drabko
Katarzyna Drabko

Medical University

6
Jerzy Kowalczyk
Jerzy Kowalczyk

Medical University

6
Joanna Dziopa
Joanna Dziopa

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine

5
Janusz Lange
Janusz Lange

Lower Silesian Center for Cellular Transplantation with National Bone Marrow Donor Registry

5

Publications

47Publications

412Reads

96PubMed Central Citations

Prediction of NK Cell Licensing Level in Selection of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donor, Initial Results.

Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) 2016 Dec 8;64(Suppl 1):63-71. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Indira Gandhi 14, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
December 2016
21 Reads
3.180 Impact Factor

Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

Sleep 2016 Mar 1;39(3):581-7. Epub 2016 Mar 1.

National Reference Laboratory for Histocompatibility, Transplantation Immunology Unit, Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

View Article
March 2016
16 Reads
7 Citations
4.591 Impact Factor

The patterns of MHC association in aplastic and non-aplastic paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) 2011 Jun 27;59(3):231-8. Epub 2011 Mar 27.

Department of Immunogenetics, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 14 Indira Gandhi Street, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
June 2011
8 Reads
2 Citations
3.180 Impact Factor

Association of HLA haplotypes with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

Transplant Proc 2010 Oct;42(8):3266-70

Department of Immunogenetics, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
October 2010
4 Reads
2 Citations

[The role of HLA disparity in hematopoietic stem cells transplantation] Rola niezgodności HLA w transplantacjach komórek krwiotwórczych

Authors:
Jacek Nowak

Hematologia 2010; 1: 49-58.

Hematologia

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) disparity between hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) donor and recipient triggers T-cell and NK-cell allorecognition, and induces the graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect and/or may cause an engraftment failure. This review shows the scope of human genomic variation, the methods of HLA typing, principles of the novel HLA nomenclature effective as from 2010 and interpretation of high-resolution HLA results. It describes the main subsets of related and unrelated HSC donors and sum up the main aspects of HLA disparity and their effect on the outcome of the patients after allogeneic HSC transplantation. The HLA match between HSC donor and recipient is crucial, but for many patients a perfectly matched donor can be unavailable. The HSC transplantation from the alternative mismatched donor with one allele/antigen mismatch (9/10) can be as beneficial as HSC transplantation from fully matched donor (10/10), especially in younger patients. For the remaining patients, the donors with permissive mismatches may be the option. The permissiveness depends not only on the potential adverse effect of the HLA mismatches, but also on the urgency of the transplantation, desirable GvL effect, and potential efficacy of the alternative therapy available for the patient.

View Article
January 2010
3 Reads

The Role of Major Histocompatibility Complex Polymorphisms in the Incidence and Outcome of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Curr. Immunol. Rev. 2009 Nov 1;5(4):300-10.

Current Immunology Reviews

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are involved in various mechanisms of pathogenesis and immunoediting of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). MHC class III polymorphisms, located within tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family gene cluster, have diverse expression in normal individuals and lymphoma patients, and their expression depends on the allelic version. Certain HLA class I and II gene products are involved in the tumor peptide presentation and ligation of specific T-cell receptors (TCR). They are involved in NHL pathogenesis either directly or as a consequence of the linkage disequilibrium (LD) with causative genes. TNF polymorphic alleles and closely located nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cell inhibitor like 1 (NFKBIL1) may lead to up-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) and adverse outcome of certain subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In addition, HLA class I ligation to the natural killer (NK)-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) plays a critical role in immunosurveillance of the tumors, which may result in deterioration of NHL outcome, especially when the repertoire of MHC-KIR interaction is reduced. This review summarizes clinical data of MHC allele and haplotype polymorphisms and their pleiotropic or epistatic links to the pathogenesis of NHL.

View Article
November 2009
11 Reads

Role of HLA in hematopoietic SCT.

Authors:
J Nowak

Bone Marrow Transplant 2008 Oct;42 Suppl 2:S71-6

Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
October 2008
8 Reads
7 Citations
3.570 Impact Factor

Host immune response in B-cell lymphomas: friend or foe?

Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) 2008 Jul-Aug;56(4):245-55. Epub 2008 Jul 29.

Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

View Article
October 2008
3 Reads
4 Citations
3.180 Impact Factor

Road-like pattern of HLA-ABDR-based genetic distances between populations

Centr. Eur. J. Immunol. 2008;33(3):114-9.

Genetic distances between populations may indicate the optimal direction of hematopoietic stem cell donor search. In some extent straight-line spatial geographic distances are similar to genetic distances. We tested the hypothesis that natural barriers, such as mountains, water reservoirs, desert and permafrost areas can change simple correlation between geography and genetics. We typed 200 healthy individuals of Polish population in HLA-A, B and DRB1 at the allelic level and compared allele group frequencies with 38 world populations. Standard Nei’s pairwise genetic distances were estimated and correlated with land road distances in kilometres and straight-line spatial geographic distances. The genetic distances between all 39 populations were highly correlated with road distances (r=0.499, P=0.0012, df. =37). The correlation was much higher when estimation was limited to non-admixed and non-transferred populations (ie. when African American 1998, African American 2007, Argentina Buenos Aires, Belgian Total and Turkish minority in Germany, have been removed) (r=0.831, P=1,2E-09, df.=32). Simultaneously the straight-line spatial geographic distances correlated with genetic distances even higher (r=0.699, P=7.3E-07, df.=32 and r=0.848, P=2.4E-10, df.=32, respectively, for all 39 and 34 non-admixed/non-transferred populations). The preliminary analysis of a limited number of populations (N=20) has shown that the straight-line geographic spatial distances correlated with genetic distances much less than road distances (r=0.442, P=0.051, df.=18 vs. r=0.550, P=0.012, df.=18, respectively for straight-line and road distances). Simultaneously, geographic-like pattern of gene frequency low dimensional correspondence analysis was displayed in three dimensional projection. These results confirm considerable dependence of genetic and geographic distances. The results support the hypothesis that natural gene spread-out must have been more similar to waves and water circle-like propagation than to journeys along single paths. Natural barriers such as water reservoirs and mountains have had limited influence.

View Article
July 2008
9 Reads

Allele and extended haplotype polymorphism of HLA-A, -C, -B, -DRB1 and -DQB1 loci in Polish population and genetic affinities to other populations.

Tissue Antigens 2008 Mar 7;71(3):193-205. Epub 2008 Jan 7.

Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
March 2008
6 Reads
6 Citations
2.140 Impact Factor

Haplotype-specific pattern of association of human major histocompatibility complex with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma outcome.

Tissue Antigens 2008 Jan 29;71(1):16-26. Epub 2007 Oct 29.

Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
January 2008
4 Reads
4 Citations
2.140 Impact Factor

Leucocyte antibodies in blood donors and a look back on recipients of their blood components.

Vox Sang 2007 Apr;92(3):247-9

Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
April 2007
4 Reads
12 Citations
2.800 Impact Factor

Reliability of HLA-Cw data collected in unrelated bone marrow registry and their usefulness for preliminary donor selection.

Int J Immunogenet 2005 Oct;32(5):319-22

Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
October 2005
3 Reads
1.340 Impact Factor

[Conditions of selection and matching of bone marrow donors for transplantation].

Wiad Lek 2004 ;57(9-10):480-4

Zakładu Immunologii Hematologicznej i Transfuzjologicznej, Instytutu Hematologii i Transfuzjologii w Warszawie.

View Article
May 2005
4 Reads

Analysis of HLA frequencies in donor population of Unrelated Bone Marrow Donor and Cord Blood Registry of Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion

Centr. Eur. J. Immunol. 2002 Jul 16;27(3),97-115.

Central European Journal of Immunology

The HLA alleles and haplotypes frequencies of Polish population are helpful in the routine work of HLA laboratory and in searching of unrelated bone marrow donors for Polish patients. HLA I class typing was performed by standard serological method in 2580 potential donors from Poland, and HLA DRB1 DNA typing by PCR-SSP or PCR-SSOP at low resolution level in 386 donors chosen by chance from the said population. Allelic and haplotypic (2 or 3 loci haplotype) gene frequencies were estimated by iterative maximum likelihood gene counting method supplemented by expectation maximization and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium algorithm using ML-EM-HW v. 5.2 software elaborated in our Institute. The resolution of used methods was: 24 specificities of HLA-A, 46 HLA-B, 11 HLA-Cw, and 17 HLA*DRB1. There was a different portion of HLA “blank” in each locus. Allele gene frequencies were comparable with other Central Europe population frequencies. Estimated and observed antigen phenotypic frequencies were very similar. Fit to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested by c2 test for each locus separately and was good (p=1.0000). The highest positive linkage was found in following two-locus haplotypes: A*01-B*08 (GF 0.0739, D 0.0613, p<0.0001), A*03-B*07 (GF 0.0504, D 0.0333, p<0.0001) and A*25-B*18 (GF 0.0334, D 0.0288, p<0.0001). Very high, but negative linkage was found for A*02-B*08 (GF 0.0075, D -0.0215, p<0.0001) and A*01-B*18 (GF 0.0010, D -0.0095, p<0.0001) two-locus haplotypes. Sixteen HLA-A-B-DRB1 three-locus haplotypes showed gene frequency above 1%. Alleles of each of these haplotypes are in strong positive gametic linkage. The most frequent haplotypes in Polish population are: A*01-B*08-DRB1*03 (7.5%) and A*03-B*07-DRB1*15 (3.4%). It was tested by Chi2 test that Czech, Russian, German and Finn populations are most similar to Polish comparing three most frequent HLA-A,B,DRB1 haplotypes in these populations.

View Article
July 2002
12 Reads

[Class II HLA antigens in patients with multiple sclerosis from Warsaw and Gdansk regions].

Neurol Neurochir Pol 1997 Mar-Apr;31(2):229-36

Oddziału Neurologicznego Specjalistycznego Psychiatryczno-Neurologicznego ZOZ-u, Gdańsku.

View Article
October 1997
3 Reads
0.540 Impact Factor

[Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac structures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

Pol Arch Med Wewn 1997 Apr;97(4):352-8

Kliniki Chorób Wewnetrznych i Kardiologii Instytutu Medycyny Wewnetrznej Centralnego Szpitala-Klinicznego Wojskowej Akademii Medycznej w Warszawie.

View Article
April 1997
4 Reads

Atopic diseases in a pair of monozygotic twins.

Mater Med Pol 1996 Jan-Mar;28(1):13-6

Department of Dermatology, Medical Academy in Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
April 1997
3 Reads

The associations of HLA with psoriasis

Centr. Europ. J. Immunol 1996;21:226-9.

Central European Journal of Immunology

HLA class I and class II antigens in 118 young man with psoriasis and in 121 healthy blood donors were determined. Frequencies of HLA appearance in both groups were compared. Clinical course, positive family history and labotatory measures were evaluated in psoriatic patients. HLA A2, 28, 31; B13, 17, w4; Cw3, w6; DR7 and 53 appearance was significantly higher in psoriatic patients than in controls. The highest relative risk of psoriasis was associated with Cw6 (RR=7.85), B17 (RR=6.32) and B13 (RR=5.50). RR in DR7 positive patients was 4.97 and in DR53 positive patients it was similar (RR=5.13). Family data revealed thar 9.9% of parens and 13.0% of siblings were affected with psoriasis. In patients with psoriatic mothers B17, Bw4, Cw6 and DR7 antigens were found. In patients with fathers affected with psoriasis only B17 was demonstrated. Yet, some localisations of skin lesions (on trunk and scalp) correlated with DR7. Our data confirm contribution of genetic factor(s) to pathogenesis of psoriasis. The factor(s) can have an influence on clinical course as well. The genetic factors are probably associated primarily with Cw6 (P=1E-11).

View Article
September 1996
10 Reads

24-h ECG monitoring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Eur Heart J 1995 Jun;16(6):848-51

Institute of Internal Medicine, Central Military Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.

View Article
June 1995
9 Reads
1 Citation
15.203 Impact Factor

[Twenty-four hour monitoring of electrocardiogram in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

Pol Tyg Lek 1992 Oct 5-12;47(40-41):910-2

Instytutu Medycyny Wewnetrznej, Warszawie.

View Article
May 1993
5 Reads

The association of HLA histocompatibility antigens with multiple sclerosis

Centr. Europ. J. Immunol. 1992;12:91-100.

Central European Journal of Immunology

An investigation of class I and II histocompatibility antigens was carried out in140 patients with a definitive diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) according to Poser's criteria. The control group consisted of 206 healthy persons, the majority being blood donors. Histocompatibility antigens were assassed with a microlymphocytotoxic test. The following antigens were determined: 17 of A locus, 33 of the B locus, 8 of the C locus, 6 of the DR locus and 1 of the DQ locus. A probable polygenetic susceptibility for MS was found in our patients. In Poland this susceptibility is connected more with antigens HLA-DQw1 (OR=2.84, p<0,001) and HLA-DR3 (OR=2.16, p<0.01) than DR2 (OR=1.68, p<0.05). The distribution of HLA antigens and their haplotypes was typical for a region with a high risk of developing MS. It is impossible to predict the course of the disease on the basis of the HLA antygen distribution. An association of MS with HLA class I antigens was not found.

View Article
July 1992
11 Reads

[Incidence of antigen expression for HLA antigens A,B,C and DR in patients with atopic diseases in Poland].

Pol Tyg Lek 1990 Oct 15-29;45(42-44):851-4

III Kliniki Instytutu Medycyny Wewnetrznej, Warszawie.

View Article
August 1991
3 Reads

Top co-authors

Krzysztof Warzocha
Krzysztof Warzocha

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine

10
Anna Gronkowska
Anna Gronkowska

Medical University of Warsaw

7
Andrzej Hellmann
Andrzej Hellmann

Medical University of Gdansk

6
Andrzej Lange
Andrzej Lange

L. Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy

6
Katarzyna Drabko
Katarzyna Drabko

Medical University

6
Jerzy Kowalczyk
Jerzy Kowalczyk

Medical University

6
Joanna Dziopa
Joanna Dziopa

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine

5
Janusz Lange
Janusz Lange

Lower Silesian Center for Cellular Transplantation with National Bone Marrow Donor Registry

5