Dr.  Jace Hargis, PhD - NYU Shanghai - Clinical Professor and Director

Dr. Jace Hargis

PhD

NYU Shanghai

Clinical Professor and Director

Shanghai, Pudong | China

Main Specialties: Other

Additional Specialties: Faculty Development

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-9372-2533


Top Author

Dr.  Jace Hargis, PhD - NYU Shanghai - Clinical Professor and Director

Dr. Jace Hargis

PhD

Introduction

Currently, I am a Clinical Professor and Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at NYU, Shanghai. My prior positions include a Director in southern California; a Professor and Associate Provost in Hawaii; a College Director in Abu Dhabi, UAE; an Associate Professor and Assistant Provost in northern California; and an Assistant Professor and Director of Faculty Development in Florida. I have authored a textbook, an anthology and published over 140 academic articles as well as offered hundreds of academic presentations. I have earned a BS in Oceanography from Florida Institute of Technology; an MS in Environmental Engineering Sciences and a PhD in Science Education from the University of Florida. My research focuses on how people learn while integrating appropriate, relevant and meaningful instructional technologies.

Primary Affiliation: NYU Shanghai - Shanghai, Pudong , China

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. Jace Hargis’s Resume / CV

Metrics

Number of Publications

80

Publications

Number of Profile Views

2182

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

30

Reads

Education

Jun 1989 - May 1999
University of Florida
PhD
Jun 1989 - May 1992
University of Florida
M.S.
Sep 1980 - Jun 1984
Florida Institute of Technology
B.S.

Experience

Apr 2016 - Jul 2018
University of California San Diego
Director
Apr 2016
University of California
Director
Mar 2015 - Mar 2016
Chaminade University of Honolulu
Associate Provost
Jul 2011 - Jul 2013
Higher Colleges of Technology
Director
Jun 2007 - Jun 2011
University of the Pacific
Assistant Provost
Aug 1999 - May 2007
University of North Florida
Director and Assistant Professor
Jul 2018
New York University Shanghai
Clinical Professor and Director
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Publications

80Publications

30Reads

The Value of Ethnography: A Pilot Study on a Class on Pedagogical Instruction

Hardesty, R., Gluckman, M., & Hargis, J. (2018). The value of ethnography: A pilot study on a class on pedagogical instruction. Transformative Dialogues: Teaching and Learning Journal, 11(2), 1-17

Transformative Dialogues: Teaching & Learning Journal

Participant observation ethnography as a primary methodology, while common in other areas of social science, has been underrepresented in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) literature. In many studies, ethnography is used to supplement findings or address questions arrived at through other methodologies, whereas the present pilot study promotes its viability as a primary method. In the Fall of 2017, graduate student researchers (GSRs) and other staff at the “Teaching Center” (TC) used ethnographic methodology as a means of meeting the TC’s mandate for the 2017- 2018 year. The TC wanted to gather data on the efficacy of the classes as well as the staff members’ own processes of curriculum design and implementation. By adopting participant observation ethnography, the GSRs provided data for the TC and also discovered the utility of ethnography as a tool for designing research questions. This paper has five core sections devoted to describing the pilot study. These sections cover the aims of the TC and the context in which this pilot study was developed; a review of SoTL literature and the presence of ethnography as a primary methodology within it; an outline of the development of the methods used in this study; and how ethnography served as a tool for designing subsequent research projects. It concludes by offering several recommendations and comments to SoTL practitioners who are considering using ethnographic methods in higher education.

View Article
August 2018
6 Reads

New perspective on the TPACK framework: The “A” stands for affective.

Park, E., & Hargis, J. (July 2018). New perspective on the TPACK framework: The “A” stands for affective. International Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning, 12(2).

International Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning

The purpose of this exploratory single-case study is to investigate the affordances of iPad transpired within a technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) framework by four early childhood educators with varying Technological Knowledge (TK) at a low-income preschool. Pre/post and follow-up survey, group and follow-up interviews, classroom observations and document of iPad workshop data were analyzed using coding methods in two cycles. The exploration in how teachers discovered the iPad affordances indicated parallel progression in TK and change in their value system. The exploration in the progression of TK and change in their value system suggest a relationship between progression of TK towards TPACK and of affective-valuing (AV) towards affective-characterization (AC).

View Article
July 2018
3 Reads

Student Response Systems: A Mindful Approach.

Iwamoto, D., & Hargis, J. (March 2018). Student Response Systems: A Mindful Approach. In R. Obeid, A. Schartz, C. Shane-Simpson, & P. J. Brooks (Eds.) The impact technology has on how instructors teach and how students learn. Retrieved from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology web site: http:/

In R. Obeid, A. Schartz, C. Shane-Simpson, & P. J. Brooks (Eds.) The impact technology has on how instructors teach and how students learn. Retrieved from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology we

Student Response Systems: A Mindful Approach.

View Article
March 2018
3 Reads

Practice makes deeper? Regular reflective writing during engineering internships

Minnes, M., Mayberry, J., Soto, M., & Hargis, J. (January 2018). Practice makes deeper? Regular refl

Journal of Transformative Learning

View Article
February 2018
41 Reads

What a “tweet” idea!

Teaching Children Mathematics

View Article
2017
2 Reads

Convicts, cadavers, coral reefs, coffee shops and couture: How customizing experiential learning increased learner comfort and engagement.

Grabowsky, G., Hargis, J., Davidson, J., Suh, J., Wright, C., & Paynter, A. (December 2017). Convict

Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice

http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol14/iss3/5

View Article
December 2017
35 Reads

Practice makes deeper? Regular reflective writing during engineering internships.

Minnes, M., Mayberry, J., Soto, M., & Hargis, J. (December 2017). Practice makes deeper? Regular reflective writing during engineering internships. Journal of Transformative Learning, 4(2), 7-20.

Journal of Transformative Learning

Does regular reflective writing enhance engineering students’ capacity to be reflective professionals? This study explores whether writing and sharing weekly reflections throughout a summer internship can transform the way engineering students’ think about their work in a way that connects it more profoundly with their academic studies. A quasi-experimental mixed methods design is used with a sample size of 60 participants over two years. Using the AAC&U’s Integrative Learning rubric, we find statistically significant improvement in the quality and depth of students’ written reflection at the end of a summer internship enriched with regular writing. In their writing, students find explicit concrete and abstract connections between their studies and the internship work they do, drawing lessons from it and re-conceptualizing their role as both students and engineers. The reflections facilitate transformative learning during the internship experiences, guiding students in their professional development.

View Article
December 2017
61 Reads

Integrating Twitter in the math classroom: What a “Tweet” idea!

Authors:
Soto M. & Hargis J

Soto, M., & Hargis, J. (November 2017). Integrating Twitter in the math classroom: What a “Tweet” id

NCTM Teaching Children Mathematics

View Article
November 2017
35 Reads

Andragogical design thinking: A transition to anarchy in and beyond the classroom.

Authors:
Lockard E. & Hargis J.

Lockard, E., & Hargis, J. (November 2017). Andragogical design thinking: A transition to anarchy in

Transformative Dialogues

View Article
November 2017
38 Reads

Self-Regulated learning as a critical attribute for successful teaching and learning.

Iwamoto, D., & Hargis, J. (July 2017). Self-Regulated learning as a critical attribute for successful teaching and learning. International Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 11(2).

International Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

View Article
July 2017
34 Reads

Serendipitous faculty development through Infographic active learning exploration

Authors:
Davidson J. & Hargis

Davidson, J., & Hargis (April 2016). Serendipitous faculty development through Infographic active le

International Journal on New Trends in Education

View Article
April 2017
40 Reads

A proposal to use classroom observations as assessment data to measure and evaluate effective teaching.

Authors:
Hargis J. & Soto M.

Hargis, J., & Soto, M. (April 2017). A proposal to use classroom observations as assessment data to

The Online Journal of New Horizons in Education

View Article
April 2017
31 Reads

Analyzing the efficacy of the testing effect using Kahoot on performance.

Authors:
Iwamoto D. & Hargis J.

Iwamoto, D., & Hargis, J. (April 2017). Analyzing the efficacy of the testing effect using Kahoot on

Turkish Journal of Distance Education

View Article
April 2017
33 Reads

Faculty development adjustments for international students: A case study.

Authors:
Washburn C. & Hargis J

Washburn, C., & Hargis, J. (April 2017). Faculty development adjustments for international students:

Transformative Dialogues

View Article
April 2017
37 Reads

How does the structure of a college chemistry exam affect pedagogy.

Pandey, R., Mayberry, J., & Hargis, J. (June 2016). How does the structure of a college chemistry ex

Journal of Science Education

View Article
June 2016
34 Reads

The effect of Project-Based Learning pedagogical model on achievement through the evaluative lens of student perceptions.

Iwamoto, D., Hargis, J., & Vuong, K. (January 2016). The effect of Project-Based Learning pedagogica

International Journal for the Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning

View Article
January 2016
33 Reads

An interdisciplinary approach to develop key spatial characteristics that satisfy the millennial generation in learning and work.

Authors:
Suh J. & Hargis J.

Suh, J., & Hargis, J. (January 2016). An interdisciplinary approach to develop key spatial character

Transformative Dialogues: Teaching & Learning Journal

View Article
January 2016
32 Reads

A One Year Federal Mobile Learning Initiative Review

Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, Third Edition

View Article
2015
21 Reads

Is learning effective with social networks?

Authors:
Goksel N. & Hargis J.

Goksel, N., & Hargis, J. (July 2015). Is learning effective with social networks? International Jour

International Journal on New Trends in Education and Their Implications

View Article
July 2015
37 Reads

Technology vs pedagogy: Instructional effectiveness and student perceptions of a student response system.

Galal, S., Mayberry, J., Chan, E., Hargis, J., & Halilovic, J. (June 2015). Technology vs pedagogy:

Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning

View Article
June 2015
34 Reads

EAGER adopters in education: Strategic plan ideas for integrating instructional technology

Authors:
Jace HARGIS

Strategic plans for teaching and learning are essential, however, they tend to focus on moving a mass of stakeholders along an agreeable path. The strategy is necessary and sensible, although many times, these plans miss a key audience important to the future of education, the eager adopters. Previously, this group was called “early adopters”, however, I believe that the time in which educators become involved is not as important as their eagerness. This philosophy follows Thoreau's notion that, "If a man loses pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.” It is those, who hear different drummers that may appear to be tangent to institutional missions, although they may actually be leading initiatives, which the institution may eventually adopt. Some of the eager ideas which will be shared in this paper include Social Emotional Competency, Digital Content Creation Ecosystems, MOOCs, play with purpose maker economy fabrication labs, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, big data learning analytics, wearable technology, the quantifiable self, the internet of things, and mobile learning. The paper describes these eager adopter ideas aligned to the 2014 NMC Horizon report; eager adopter philosophies; and eager adopter questions to help initiate and guide strategic planning discussions.

https://doaj.org/article/67cab3f13e7b405d914473f4b5b45495

View Article
2014
21 Reads

Students ExplainEverything using iPads

32-33

ISTE Learning & Leading with Technology

View Article
July 2014
34 Reads

iPad learning ecosystem: Developing challenge-based learning using design thinking

In order to maximize college English language students' learning, product development, 21st Century skills and engagement with real world meaningful challenges, a course was designed to integrate Challenge Based Learning (CBL) and iPad mobile learning technology. This article describes the course design, which was grounded in design thinking, and provides an overview of the pilot implementation of the course. The course achieved its goals to a great extent in that learners felt that they were beginning to help build a better college community by sharing stories of their learning experience and their insights about the essential question they chose with other students and with other teachers. The course also helped the students discover the use of English as they found ways to reach out to the broader college community and held meaningful conversations with teachers, librarians, managers, and staff from different departments and other students. The course transformed the teacher/researcher into an observer of learning and a guide, thus flipping the classroom and allowing the learners to take responsibility and steer their own learning experiences. Further development is needed in the areas of CBL assessment rubric development in English Language Teaching (ELT) and the analysis of student generated content through iPad applications.

https://doaj.org/article/d668d7b8158641b6a9575230fb8a0d62

View Article
2013
21 Reads

Marketing to and Developing Faculty Members to Create High Quality, Highly Interactive Online Courses

Authors:
Jace Hargis

In this paper, the author shares a detailed process for soliciting and securing exemplar faculty members, who are ready to redesign and offer their course in a high quality online environment. The goal is to help faculty create highly engaging online learning opportunities as good as or better than their current face to face classes. Interested faculty members submitted a competitive proposal, and were selected to interact in a highly dynamic three day short course. The course introduced and applied learning theories as a mechanism to help faculty develop their materials, so that learners could attend, process, retain and use meaningful conceptually-based material. The outcome of the program was targeted, high quality online courses; word of mouth support and requests for short courses from our law and dental schools.

http://services.igi-global.com/resolvedoi/resolve.aspx?doi=10.4018/ijtem.2011070104

View Article
2013
17 Reads

Measuring the difficult to measure: iPad mobile learning

3(2), 60-77

International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning

View Article
June 2013
132 Reads

iCelebrate Teaching and Learning: Sharing the iPad Experience

Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology

View Article
January 2013
20 Reads

Second Life Brought to Life

Cases on Technological Adaptability and Transnational Learning

View Article
2012
20 Reads

Digital storytelling: Kizoa, animoto, and photo story 3

Educators know that students create better projects when they are personally invested in the material (Brookhart, Bronowicz 2003; McInerney 2008; Braxton 2008). The rewards are particularly significant when students can exercise some degree of creativity in the process of developing their projects (Su 2009). Possibly this is a result of engaging both hemispheres of the brain (Tatar 2009), or otherwise simply a reflection of the human preference to employ creativity in any endeavor, including “work” related ones.One tried-and-true avenue for creative expression is through the use of stories or narratives. Simply including a narrative component may provide enough creative ammunition for students to feel that a particular assignment can be more interesting (Clark 2010), if their work is to be wrapped around a narrative format, such as a short story in favor of an essay or formal writing. But there are numerous free technology tools available today that take the process one step further, by injecting different editing options and high-end production values. Students do not merely assemble a story in words. They can now do it primarily with images, and many of the slideshow services online allow for text captions, dynamic transitions, special effects, and relevant animations. Students become videographers and directors as much as they function as storytellers. The slideshow builders thus do a better job than “old fashioned” essay/short story assignments at meeting the need of 21st century students, many of whom arrive at institutions of higher learning with at least an already-ingrained interest in such tools, if not explicit experience.Kizoa (www.kizoa.com) offers a simple menu-driven, Flash-based interface for users to craft slideshows with uploaded images, added text, transitions, animations, special effects, and music selected from their limited online repository or uploaded in mp3 format. Users drag images and any desired effects onto a timeline at the bottom of the screen, in a workflow reminiscent of most software used to edit home movies. The service is free, but much of the content (transitions, effects) provided are classified as premium content; to actually use or share a slideshow using that content, the user would need to upgrade to a paid account. If the slideshow was built using only the free content (which is a more limited selection), the slideshow can be shared on Facebook, or a URL can be sent by email. Once on the webpage, a user will also find code for embedding the slideshow into a blog or webpage. The Flash-based product cannot be downloaded; it must be kept current at Kizoa and linked to for the intended audience to view.

https://doaj.org/article/8b4ace20666e4f4f8651e1868bb1037b

View Article
2012
19 Reads

Facilitating teaching and learning: From proprietary to community source

2012 International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, ITHET 2012

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84866605746&partnerID=MN8TOARS

View Article
July 2012
20 Reads

Design Features for Online Examination Software

Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education

View Article
January 2012
22 Reads

Using google+ for instruction

Introduced in July, 2011 in a beta test of invited users only, the new social media service Google+ (or G+) quickly spread by word of mouth, and Google leader Larry Page (2011) blogged that within sixteen days it had 10 million users. By August, it had 25 million users (Cashmore, 2011). Even with slower growth ahead (still with no marketing budget), the service looks likely to crest 100 million users perhaps as early as ten months, a feat that took Facebook three years. Other social networks, most notably Facebook and Twitter, have been used increasingly as instructional tools, since they are platforms with which students are already familiar (Maloney, 2007; McLoughlin & Lee, 2007). Selwyn (2009) found that students often eschew official channels for communication in favor of less formal community-based formats such as Facebook, implying a growing need for instructional communication tools that will be used willingly by students. The question is whether Google+ can be used like Twitter or Facebook to augment instruction, or even, perhaps, to improve upon those predecessors for academic purposes. Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user’s posts. There is no direct “friend” relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into “lists” like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more “circles,” the better to monitor (or control) the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook.

https://doaj.org/article/ce828ed2b1dd40a7830dac0fa8cadfec

View Article
2011
18 Reads

SNAPP: Graphing student interactions in a learning management system

One of the more vexing problems in teaching fully-online classes concerns the development of community. As Rovai (2001) identified, online courses must combat feelings of isolation and impart a sense of personal and individual attention. To create a sense of belonging and togetherness, instructors typically need to surmount numerous technological hurdles inherent in online delivery, not least of which is the inescapable conclusion that the one factor most basic to the formation of community-face to face interaction-is by definition absent in an online class. Many new tech-based teaching tools have been developed in an attempt to ameliorate the digital alienation and promote interaction, such as discussion boards, synchronous chat rooms, and emerging media like wikis, blogs and podcasts, as well as virtual worlds, such as Second Life. As the frequency of interaction grows, so does the sense of belonging to a learning community (Dawson, 2008).

https://doaj.org/article/2496ef9ce184420b8333815208023fa8

View Article
2011
19 Reads

A doctoral program for the world: Global tertiary education and leadership

Authors:
Jace Hargis

The purpose of this paper is to share the findings of a highly generalizable investigative feasibility project, whose goal is to enhance the teaching ability of current higher education faculty members. The mission of the project was to introduce a new doctoral degree on Global Education and Leadership (GEL) geared toward a ubiquitous, broad approach to assist faculty members in their pursuit of improved teaching and learning. The methods used were to perform an online search identifying 18 different institutions, whose mission focused on both student-centered learning, as well as pursued an active scholarship of teaching and learning agenda; contact 52 key personnel for a visit to share our program; travel to each of eight countries to share the vision of the program in five weeks; and finally to collate results and examine trends and identify host institutions, accreditation steps and start dates. The major result of this experience was the unanimous agreement on the universal unsystematic process of providing tertiary faculty members with the essential andragogical methods to efficiently and effectively become exemplar teachers. Due to the overwhelming uniformity in affirmative response to the program, the key conclusion is to move forward with the doctoral program aggressively.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.680.8205

View Article
January 2012
66 Reads

Open-source and royalty-free images for instruction: Compfight and wylio

As student audiences become ever more sophisticated, they yearn for increasing amounts of visual stimulation alongside the traditional text-based approach of content delivery. The first step in a sequence of learning and memory events is for the learner to attend to a viable stimulus (Gagne, 1973; Keele, 1973; & Bransford, 1979). Following successful attention to viable stimuli, the Information Processing Theory (Atkinson & Shiffrin, 1971) holds that the learner relates new knowledge to existing information in the short term memory. If the information is determined to be of subsequent value, the learner transfers the information into the long-term memory, where knowledge is permanently stored. Following this logic, it seems apparent that significant effort should be expended to make sure that the first step -viable stimuli- is provided to the viewer. Students already want stimulation to be ever more visual in nature, and if the predictions of Martin Van der Werf and Grant Sabatier (2009) come true, students in the near future will expect an educational menu from which they can select, assemble, and remix their academic brew of choice; a choice, one assumes, to be guided at least partly by the visual attractiveness of the material.

https://doaj.org/article/b469d9080ba04f258d59d7527e8da38d

View Article
2011
21 Reads

Google moderator and other clicker alternatives

The use of Audience Response Systems, commonly called “clickers,” has grown in recent years as instructors have discovered the dual benefits of interaction and accountability when teaching large classes. Caldwell (2007) has shown that “these systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods”. MacArthur and Jones (2008) have found that students generally have a positive attitude towards clickers, as well as research indicates measureable increases in learning through the use of collaborative response systems. Without clickers, enforcing accountability may still be possible through the use of online quizzes, but interaction remains difficult to implement. One of more obvious problems is the chaotic noise that results with verbal communication, but more subtle dangers lurk as well, such as reaching students who normally hesitate to volunteer, especially in large class settings. One business model using clickers generally involves students purchasing a handheld device (often in the $20-$25 range) and then also paying $20 or more to activate the device for the current semester.

https://doaj.org/article/38b1d34eb45345b38ee6ac469fc4d799

View Article
2011
21 Reads

Marketing and developing faculty to create high quality online courses

Authors:
Jace Hargis

1(2), 62-71

International Journal of Technology and Educational Marketing

View Article
September 2011
32 Reads

Screencasts

Well-known for some years to advanced technology users, Screen Capture Software (SCS) offers the promise of recording action on the computer desktop (right down to the mouse movement and mouse clicks) together with voiceover narration, all combined into a single movie file that can be shared, emailed, or uploaded. Educause (2006) defines screencasts as the “screen capture of the actions on a user’s computer screen, typically (http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7012.pdf) with accompanying audio, distributed through RSS. SCS burst forth on the scene in the mid 2000s with prominent names like TechSmith’s Camtasia ($299) and Adobe’s Captivate ($799). These full-featured programs include every editing, mixing, and re-mastering function imaginable, and are very user-friendly. The more recent years have seen much lower-cost alternatives such as SnagIt ($49), FullShot ($49), and !Quick Screen Recorder ($29), as well as a dozen others, all of which bundle fewer services in exchange for the lower price. While maintaining the user-friendly functionality, they often restrict file output to only one or two file types, and offer minimal editing tools, or sometimes none at all. The third wave of innovation in the SCS realm has come about even more recently, with many suitable screen capture technologies now completely free to the user. CamStudio (www.camstudio.org) offers a free download for a minimalist screen recorder that offers output in .avi (Audio Video Interleave) or .swf (Small Web File) formats (with the latter especially recommended for direct integration with an online Learning Management System like BlackBoard). There are few other features in CamStudio, save the ability to manually set the recording field if the full screen is not desired. Because CamStudio is free of most editing tools, however, its stripped-down status renders the end user experience simple in the extreme. Users wishing to edit the videos after initial recording may find the .avi output of CamStudio useful, though .avi files are uncompressed and usually too large to upload or attach to an email, leading to a need to save the files later with a different filetype.

https://doaj.org/article/e54348bc0a104180b91253a223aee15f

View Article
2010
2 Reads

Youtube and video quizzes

The Internet sensation YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) has become such a force online that it was estimated in 2006 to account for a full tenth of the bandwidth by the entire Internet in the United States (WebProNews, 2007), and to use as much bandwidth in 2007 as the entire Internet had done in 2000 (Carter, 2008). Like many technological tools created with entertainment or profit in mind, YouTube can now be easily and usefully adopted by instructors for educational purposes, and indeed many professors use YouTube in their classroom teaching already (Brooks, 2000). This is especially true for passive uses of YouTube; watching videos that are already online and using them in the classroom experience to support a concept and provide another mechanism for students to connect with the topics. It is fruitful to consider Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Bloom & Krathwohl, 1956) when employing video or any media in the classroom to maximize the intentionality of teaching and learning. The use of video for demonstration or modeling corresponds well to Blooms levels of Knowledge, Comprehension, and Application; while case studies offer a chance to demonstrate Analysis and Synthesis, and perhaps even Evaluation, when comparing a video to information from a text book or other content.

https://doaj.org/article/4b5d15fe53584f3a9025da2f132369b2

View Article
2010
19 Reads

Prezi: A different way to present

For many years now, Microsoft PowerPoint has been so dominant in the field of presentation software that its name has become all but synonymous with the generic concept. Professors often assume students have access to PowerPoint to create their own student presentations (or, at a minimum, to display and print the instructors’ slides for use as notes or handouts, particularly since Microsoft offers a free viewer for download for anyone who lacks the full software). Even Macintosh users can reliably be assumed to have the ability to create and view PPT files, even though native Mac applications like Keynote promise enhanced design possibilities

https://doaj.org/article/c096d722c8ff435086a6cc239a1c7bf4

View Article
2010
21 Reads

The critical role of a faculty center in developing and retaining faculty

21(2)

Metropolitan Universities Journal

View Article
December 2010
31 Reads

Review of outcomes from a change in faculty clinic management in a U.S. dental school.

J Dent Educ 2010 Sep;74(9):961-9

University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, 2155 Webster Street, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.

View Article
September 2010
30 Reads
1.040 Impact Factor

iPhones and Smartphones

Long utilized in European and Asian countries, fast ―next generation‖ cell phonenetworks and mobile data streams have only recently begun to make deep inroads inthe United States, and companies are scrambling to write content, tools, and newapplets (―apps‖) for these users. The iPhone has become a juggernaut in the UnitedStates, with 13 million units sold in 2008 (a 245% increase over 2007) and a further 45million units expected in 2009 (Elmer-DeWitt, 2009). While iPhone still lags Nokia andRIM internationally, the overall trend toward mobile computing becomes firmer by theday, and it behooves educators to become familiar with the cell phone tools that arerelevant for teaching in tomorrow‘s--and increasingly ―today‘s‖--classroom.Smartphones have for years offered SMS instant messaging, but the first uses of thattechnology have inevitably been social rather than educational in nature (Reid, 2004).The recent rise in popularity of the iPhone has, however, sparked interest in new usesfor SMS with the advent of new and expanded audiences. One promising online tooloffers instant polling via SMS: polleverywhere.com‘s free account allows up to 30responses per 1-question poll, with unlimited polls per account.This opens up the possibility of classroom response systems that require no studentpurchases of the clicker hardware. While accountability back to the student and gradesare not feasible with polleverywhere.com‘s solution, instructors can harvest quick,anonymous feedback and encourage otherwise reluctant students to engage andparticipate.Apart from texting, modern cell phones come equipped with cameras, which cancombine with email capabilities to offer a potent alternative to writing on whiteboards.Working at their seats, singly or in groups, students can photograph their work andemail it to the instructor, who then can choose from the submissions which to highlighton the lecture hall‘s projection of his computer station, and further discuss theanonymous work. Cameras may also be useful in field work and group projects.But perhaps the greatest use of Smartphones has been the web browsing capability.Essentially pocket computers carried by almost all students, today‘s cell phones cansurf the Internet and access most content that formerly had to be seen from theirdesktop computers at home.Instructors might imagine students in the lecture hall looking up facts, verifyinginformation, or using web-based prompts for roleplays, groupwork, and problem-basedlearning, in some cases entirely replacing the need for handouts.10There are limitations; some Course-Management Software (CMS) like BlackBoard maynot function on cell phone browsers, since they lack web programming languages suchas Flash or Java.One of the major revolutions created by the iPhone specifically has been theconvenience of offering apps, including many free ones, from the ubiquitous iTunesshopping cart software also used to purchase and manage mp3s on iPods. The resultingcascade of available apps has been breathtaking. In the first twelve months since itsinception in July, 2008, the iTunes App Store logged 65,000 apps and 1.5 billiondownloads (Apple, 2009).Inevitably, many apps are offered for free, and dozens speak to individual industriesand disciplines. The list is seemingly endless: customizable flash cards, an interactiveperiodic table, the collected works of Shakespeare, scientific and graphic calculators(which can render 3D objects and rotate them at a touch), art collections, MRI brainscans, foreign language tutors, maps of the world, dictionaries, and dozens more.iPhones feature still more built-in applications, including one for YouTube that mayalso encourage faculty to weave more videos into their teaching. Suddenly, studentsmay have access to rich media right from their seats, and the possibilities for on-thespotgroupwork are enticing indeed.The primary hurdle may not be technological, but rather financial in nature. Not everystudent will have a SmartPhone, let alone an iPhone specifically. Abilene ChristianUniversity (ACU, 2009) became the first college in the United States to give allincoming freshmen an iPhone or iPod Touch, and both University of Florida‘s College ofPharmacy (Martin, 2009) and the University of Missouri‘s School of Journalism (Eddy,2009) will start requiring incoming students to purchase their own, but these areexceptions rather than the rule. For most universities, it is difficult to imaginemandating such purchases from individual students, so instructors will most likely bereduced to seeking volunteers from among the class population.Inevitably, this willresult in the formation of buzz groups clustered around the iPhone bearers, which inand of itself may not be a bad thing, though it may take longer to organize groups an(...)

https://doaj.org/article/d727d8ceba1443538e08a2e753de8c6b

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2009
20 Reads

Science education travel pedagogy

Authors:
Jace Hargis

July 15-18

International Congress of Science Education Proceedings

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July 2009
42 Reads

Interdisciplinary project- based model for enhanced instruction of marketing courses

3(1)

International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

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January 2009
39 Reads

Interdisciplinary Project-Based Model for Enhanced Instruction of Courses

International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

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January 2009
21 Reads

Ubiquitous, free, and efficient online collaboration tools for teaching and learning

This article provides an overview of free, online tools that make collaboration effective, efficient, and engaging. Each tool is available world-wide wherever there is access to the internet. These tools help create a more collaborative environment because they allow for voice, video, text, simultaneous editing, and immediate feedback. The tools presented are easy to use, user friendly, and have online support available if needed. Methods for using the tools are suggested, and examples of how they have been used by the authors are discussed. Professional presentations, instructional activities, meetings, and preparing manuscripts or other collaborative documents can all be developed in collaborative online meetings using Skype, Google tools including Talk, Chat, Calendar, Docs, and Notebooks, and Second Life. These may also be used to enhance education in distance learning or on campus classes. The features, functionality, and intuitive ease of use promote collaborative efforts, increasing the effective and efficient use of time while decreasing costs. Hyperlinks are provided for tools so users can determine technology specifications, download necessary files, learn more about their capabilities, and locate help or support information.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.610.1373

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2008
21 Reads

A second life for distance learning

Many professionals in instructional education have experienced a relatively new potential virtual learning environment, called Second Life (SL). This article will connect the virtual world to the essential next step in our learning and communicating approach, electracy. Initially, humans utilized an oral mode to communicate, followed by literacy which enabled written information. These modes in concert with an electronic medium, has produced an electracy mode of communicating. Attending to the medium as well as the method in which people now process information can assist in maximizing the power of virtual learning environments such as Second Life.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.509.1098

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2008
20 Reads

The Bridge Course Design: Formative Assessment and Student-Centered Learning in Cross-Course Classrooms

International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

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July 2008
21 Reads

Teaching project-based assessment in 12 days in a developing country

Authors:
Jace Hargis

18(3), 129-142

Journal of Excellence in College Teaching

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September 2007
35 Reads

Insights, reflections and comparisons of a Russian school

43(4), 161-167

Kappa Delta Pi Record

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June 2007
35 Reads

Can Students Learn Science Using the Internet?

Authors:
Jace Hargis

Journal of Research on Computing in Education

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July 2001
19 Reads

Social Interaction Within Technology: Reflections Through the Looking Glass

Many institutions have overcome the hurdles of finance, logistics and training to secure sufficient computer hardware and soft-ware in their colleges. These groups were able to achieve the critical mass required to gain technological momentum. Now they may be ready to address learning outcomes by actively using and integrating meaningful technology in the classroom.

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.567.414

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1969
2 Reads

Measuring the Difficult to Measure: Teaching and Learning with an iPad

This study applies a comprehensive set of measures to document teaching practice and instructor responses when integrating new mobile technology devices in the classroom. The triangulated measures include a rubric for observing teaching with mobile learning devices in higher education, an interview protocol for capturing faculty levels of mobile learning knowledge, and a survey of faculty understanding and implementation of the adopted four pillars of mobile learning. The pillars were chosen as foundations to guide why, what, where, and how mobile learning technology supports student learning. The authors offer suggestions for collecting data regarding large-scale mobile learning implementation over time with input from a range of stakeholders to capture how they characterize and disseminate pedagogies that are developed in the new learning environment.

http://services.igi-global.com/resolvedoi/resolve.aspx?doi=10.4018/jmbl.2013040104

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1969
2 Reads

Following

Hezhong Tian
Hezhong Tian

School of Environment,Beijing Normal University

Anqi Qian
Anqi Qian

University of Pittsburgh