Publications by authors named "J Victor Moreno-Mayar"

32 Publications

FrAnTK: a Frequency-based Analysis ToolKit for efficient exploration of allele sharing patterns in present-day and ancient genomic datasets.

G3 (Bethesda) 2021 Oct 13. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

Lundbeck Foundation GeoGenetics Centre, GLOBE Institute, University of Copenhagen, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Present-day and ancient population genomic studies from different study organisms have rapidly become accessible to diverse research groups worldwide. Unfortunately, as datasets and analyses become more complex, researchers with less computational experience often miss their chance to analyze their own data. We introduce FrAnTK, a user-friendly toolkit for computation and visualization of allele frequency-based statistics in ancient and present-day genome variation datasets. We provide fast, memory-efficient tools that allow the user to go from sequencing data to complex exploratory analyses and visual representations with minimal data manipulation. Its simple usage and low computational requirements make FrAnTK ideal for users that are less familiar with computer programming carrying out large-scale population studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/g3journal/jkab357DOI Listing
October 2021

Identifying a living great-grandson of the Lakota Sioux leader Tatanka Iyotake (Sitting Bull).

Sci Adv 2021 Oct 27;7(44):eabh2013. Epub 2021 Oct 27.

Lundbeck Foundation GeoGenetics Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

[Figure: see text].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abh2013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8550246PMC
October 2021

The genomic history of the Aegean palatial civilizations.

Cell 2021 05 29;184(10):2565-2586.e21. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Computational Biology, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland; Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.

The Cycladic, the Minoan, and the Helladic (Mycenaean) cultures define the Bronze Age (BA) of Greece. Urbanism, complex social structures, craft and agricultural specialization, and the earliest forms of writing characterize this iconic period. We sequenced six Early to Middle BA whole genomes, along with 11 mitochondrial genomes, sampled from the three BA cultures of the Aegean Sea. The Early BA (EBA) genomes are homogeneous and derive most of their ancestry from Neolithic Aegeans, contrary to earlier hypotheses that the Neolithic-EBA cultural transition was due to massive population turnover. EBA Aegeans were shaped by relatively small-scale migration from East of the Aegean, as evidenced by the Caucasus-related ancestry also detected in Anatolians. In contrast, Middle BA (MBA) individuals of northern Greece differ from EBA populations in showing ∼50% Pontic-Caspian Steppe-related ancestry, dated at ca. 2,600-2,000 BCE. Such gene flow events during the MBA contributed toward shaping present-day Greek genomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2021.03.039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8127963PMC
May 2021

Population genomics of the Viking world.

Nature 2020 09 16;585(7825):390-396. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

NTNU University Museum, Department of Archaeology and Cultural History, Trondheim, Norway.

The maritime expansion of Scandinavian populations during the Viking Age (about AD 750-1050) was a far-flung transformation in world history. Here we sequenced the genomes of 442 humans from archaeological sites across Europe and Greenland (to a median depth of about 1×) to understand the global influence of this expansion. We find the Viking period involved gene flow into Scandinavia from the south and east. We observe genetic structure within Scandinavia, with diversity hotspots in the south and restricted gene flow within Scandinavia. We find evidence for a major influx of Danish ancestry into England; a Swedish influx into the Baltic; and Norwegian influx into Ireland, Iceland and Greenland. Additionally, we see substantial ancestry from elsewhere in Europe entering Scandinavia during the Viking Age. Our ancient DNA analysis also revealed that a Viking expedition included close family members. By comparing with modern populations, we find that pigmentation-associated loci have undergone strong population differentiation during the past millennium, and trace positively selected loci-including the lactase-persistence allele of LCT and alleles of ANKA that are associated with the immune response-in detail. We conclude that the Viking diaspora was characterized by substantial transregional engagement: distinct populations influenced the genomic makeup of different regions of Europe, and Scandinavia experienced increased contact with the rest of the continent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2688-8DOI Listing
September 2020
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