Publications by authors named "J Thomas Beatty"

634 Publications

Complete clinical response to combined antifungal therapy in two cats with invasive fungal rhinosinusitis caused by cryptic species in section .

Med Mycol Case Rep 2021 Dec 2;34:13-17. Epub 2021 Sep 2.

University of Sydney, Faculty of Science, Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.

Cryptic species in section are increasingly reported to cause invasive aspergillosis in humans and animals. These infections are often refractory to treatment because of intrinsic antifungal resistance. We report two cases of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in domestic cats caused by and . Clinical signs resolved after combined therapy including posaconazole, caspofungin and terbinafine. Both cases remained asymptomatic more than 2 years from initial presentation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mmcr.2021.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8437771PMC
December 2021

Disseminated invasive aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus felis in a cat.

J Vet Intern Med 2021 Aug 20. Epub 2021 Aug 20.

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Jockey Club College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong, SAR China.

A 2-year-old male desexed Ragdoll cat with a 1-year history of sneezing and nasal discharge presented with a large subcutaneous cervical mass, identified as the right medial retropharyngeal lymph node on computed tomography (CT). A right orbital mass, destructive sino-nasal cavity disease and multiple pulmonary nodules were also identified. Aspergillus felis was cultured from the lymph node. After treatment with posaconazole and liposomal amphotericin B the lymph node enlargement and orbital mass resolved but left frontal sinus involvement and pulmonary lesions persisted despite additional caspofungin therapy. The cat was euthanized 14 months after diagnosis with dysphagia and chronic progressive exophthalmos. A meningeal granuloma with intravascular fungal hyphae was identified at post-mortem and A felis was cultured from the left frontal sinus and a right retrobulbar fungal granuloma. This case demonstrates that disseminated disease is a possible sequel to invasive fungal rhinosinusitis caused by A felis in cats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.16245DOI Listing
August 2021

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic On Emergency Adult Surgical Patients and Surgical Services: An International Multi-Center Cohort Study and Department Survey.

Ann Surg 2021 Aug 16. Epub 2021 Aug 16.

Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom Centre for Mathematics of Precision Healthcare, Imperial College London, United Kingdom Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Objectives: The PREDICT study aimed to determine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected surgical services and surgical patients and to identify predictors of outcomes in this cohort.

Background: High mortality rates were reported for surgical patients with COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic. However, the indirect impact of the pandemic on this cohort is not understood, and risk predictors are yet to be identified.

Methods: PREDICT is an international longitudinal cohort study comprising surgical patients presenting to hospital between March and August 2020, conducted alongside a survey of staff redeployment and departmental restructuring. A subgroup analysis of 3176 adult emergency patients, recruited by 55 teams across 18 countries is presented.

Results: Among adult emergency surgical patients, all-cause in-hospital mortality (IHM) was 3 6%, compared to 15 5% for those with COVID-19. However, only 14 1% received a COVID-19 test on admission in March, increasing to 76 5% by July.Higher Clinical Frailty Scale scores (CFS >7 aOR 18 87), ASA grade above 2 (aOR 4 29), and COVID-19 infection (aOR 5 12) were independently associated with significantly increased IHM.The peak months of the first wave were independently associated with significantly higher IHM (March aOR 4 34; April aOR 4 25; May aOR 3 97), compared to non-peak months.During the study, UK operating theatre capacity decreased by a mean of 63 6% with a concomitant 27 3% reduction in surgical staffing.

Conclusion: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted surgical patients, both directly through co-morbid infection and indirectly as shown by increasing mortality in peak months, irrespective of COVID-19 status.Higher CFS scores and ASA grades strongly predict outcomes in surgical patients and are an important risk assessment tool during the pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000005152DOI Listing
August 2021

Canine parvovirus is shed infrequently by cats without diarrhoea in multi-cat environments.

Vet Microbiol 2021 Oct 10;261:109204. Epub 2021 Aug 10.

Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia; Jockey Club College of Veterinary Medicine & Life Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. Electronic address:

Whether subclinical shedding of canine parvovirus (CPV) by cats might contribute to the epidemiology of canine CPV infections, particularly in facilities housing both cats and dogs, requires clarification. Conflicting results are reported to date. Using conventional PCR (cPCR) to amplify the VP2 gene, shedding of the CPV variants (CPV-2a, 2b, 2c) by healthy cats in multi-cat environments was reportedly common in Europe but rare in Australia. The aim of this study was to determine whether low-level faecal CPV shedding occurs in multi-cat environments in Australia and Italy using a TaqMan real-time PCR to detect Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 (CPV and feline parvovirus, FPV) DNA, and minor-groove binder probe real-time PCR assay to differentiate FPV and CPV types and to characterize CPV variants. In total, 741 non-diarrhoeic faecal samples from shelters in Australia (n = 263) and from shelters or cat colonies in Italy (n = 478) were tested. Overall, Carnivore protoparvovirus 1 DNA was detected in 49 of 741 (6.61 %) samples. Differentiation was possible for 31 positive samples. FPV was most common among positive samples (28/31, 90.3 %). CPV was detected in 4/31 samples (12.9 %) including CPV-2a in one sample, CPV-2b in another and co-infections of FPV/CPV-2b and CPV-2a/CPV-2b in the remaining two samples. A high rate of subclinical FPV infection was detected in one shelter during an outbreak of feline panleukopenia, during which 21 of 22 asymptomatic cats (95.5 %) sampled were shedding FPV. Faecal shedding of CPV by cats in multi-cat environments is uncommon suggesting that domestic cats are not significant reservoirs of CPV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2021.109204DOI Listing
October 2021

Dysbiosis of the Urinary Bladder Microbiome in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease.

mSystems 2021 Aug 27;6(4):e0051021. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

Centre for Companion Animal Health, Jockey Club College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences, City University of Hong Konggrid.35030.35, Hong Kong SAR.

Although feline urinary tract diseases cause high morbidity and mortality rates, and subclinical bacteriuria is not uncommon, the feline urinary microbiome has not been characterized. We conducted a case-control study to identify the feline urinary bladder microbiome and assess its association with chronic kidney disease (CKD), feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC), and positive urine cultures (PUCs). Of 108 feline urine samples subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, 48 (44.4%) samples reached the 500-sequence rarefaction threshold and were selected for further analysis, suggesting that the feline bladder microbiome is typically sparse. Selected samples included 17 CKD, 9 FIC, 8 PUC cases and 14 controls. Among these, 19 phyla, 145 families, and 218 genera were identified. were the most abundant, followed by . Notably, four major urotypes were identified, including two urotypes predominated by Escherichia or and two others characterized by relatively high alpha diversity, Diverse 1 and Diverse 2. Urotype was associated with disease status ( value of 0.040), with the Escherichia-predominant urotype being present in 53% of CKD cases and in all of the Escherichia coli PUC cases. Reflecting these patterns, the overall microbial composition of CKD cases was more similar to that of E. coli PUC cases than to that of controls ( value of <0.001). Finally, PUC cases had microbial compositions distinct from those of controls as well as CKD and FIC cases, with significantly lower Shannon diversity and Faith's phylogenetic diversity values. Despite the clinical importance of urinary diseases in cats, the presence of resident urine microbes has not been demonstrated in cats, and the role of these microbes as a community in urinary health remains unknown. Here, we have shown that cats with and without urinary tract disease harbor unique microbial communities in their urine. We found no evidence to suggest that the bladder microbiome is implicated in the pathogenesis of feline idiopathic cystitis, a disease similar to bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis in humans. However, cats with chronic kidney disease had dysbiosis of their bladder microbiome, which was predominated by Escherichia and had a community structure similar to that of cats with Escherichia coli cystitis. These findings suggest that chronic kidney disease alters the bladder environment to favor Escherichia colonization, potentially increasing the risk of overt clinical infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mSystems.00510-21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8407359PMC
August 2021
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