Publications by authors named "J Russell Parsons"

2,582 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Stress-Related Growth among Transgender Women: Measurement, Correlates, and Insights for Clinical Interventions.

J Homosex 2021 May 14:1-24. Epub 2021 May 14.

Department of Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York, New York, USA.

Although transgender women (TGW), and especially TGW of color, are disproportionately exposed to discrimination and violence, many of them experience stress-related growth. However, little is known about the experience of stress-related growth and its correlates among TGW. Using data from a racially-diverse sample of 210 TGW, the short version of the Stress-Related Growth Scale was modified to assess growth as a result of coming to terms with one's transgender identity among TGW. The psychometric properties of the modified scale were examined, along with its associations with various cognitive, emotional, and social factors. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed a unidimensional factor, along with excellent reliability. A stepwise regression revealed that positive reappraisal, internal locus of control, social support, and emotional expression were associated with greater stress-related growth. Findings suggest that cognitive, emotional, and social resources are related to stress-related growth in TGW. Interventions to foster stress-related growth among TGW are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2021.1921511DOI Listing
May 2021

Deemed consent for organ donation: a comparison of the English and Scottish approaches.

Authors:
Jordan A Parsons

J Law Biosci 2021 Jan-Jun;8(1):lsab003. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, UK.

Deemed consent for organ donation has long been discussed as a potential solution to the shortage of organs for transplantation, with several countries having implemented it. In Great Britain, Wales was the first nation to introduce such a system, having done so in 2015. Now, the other two nations are following suit. In this paper, I compare the approaches of England and Scotland in moving to systems of deemed consent for organ donation. After outlining both sets of legislation, I focus on three points on which the two nations differ. First, the role of those close to the deceased in the consent process and the extent to which clinicians are required to consult them ahead of consent being deemed. Second, the role of government ministers in ensuring widespread public awareness. Third, the ways in which the two nations responded to the challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to the implementation of deemed consent. I conclude that on all three points, the Scottish approach is preferable.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jlb/lsab003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7989506PMC
March 2021

High biodiversity in a benzene-degrading nitrate-reducing culture is sustained by a few primary consumers.

Commun Biol 2021 May 5;4(1):530. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Molecular Cell Biology, AIMMS, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

A key question in microbial ecology is what the driving forces behind the persistence of large biodiversity in natural environments are. We studied a microbial community with more than 100 different types of species which evolved in a 15-years old bioreactor with benzene as the main carbon and energy source and nitrate as the electron acceptor. Using genome-centric metagenomics plus metatranscriptomics, we demonstrate that most of the community members likely feed on metabolic left-overs or on necromass while only a few of them, from families Rhodocyclaceae and Peptococcaceae, are candidates to degrade benzene. We verify with an additional succession experiment using metabolomics and metabarcoding that these few community members are the actual drivers of benzene degradation. As such, we hypothesize that high species richness is maintained and the complexity of a natural community is stabilized in a controlled environment by the interdependencies between the few benzene degraders and the rest of the community members, ultimately resulting in a food web with different trophic levels.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-01948-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8099898PMC
May 2021

IMPROVING OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERSISTENCE OF CHEMICALS.

Integr Environ Assess Manag 2021 Apr 29. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Institute for Environmental Research, Aachen University, Germany.

Significant progress has been made in the scientific understanding of factors which influence the outcome of biodegradation tests used to assess the persistence (P) of chemicals. This needs to be evaluated to assess whether recently acquired knowledge could enhance existing regulations and environmental risk assessments. Biodegradation tests have limitations, which are accentuated for 'difficult to test' substances and failure to recognise these can potentially lead to inappropriate conclusions regarding a chemical's environmental persistence. Many of these limitations have been previously recognised and discussed in a series of ECETOC reports and workshops. These were subsequently used to develop a series of research projects designed to address key issues and, where possible, propose methods to mitigate the limitations of current assessments. Here, we report on the output of a Cefic LRI - Concawe Workshop held in Helsinki on 27 September 2018. The objectives of this workshop were to disseminate key findings from recent projects and assess how new scientific knowledge can potentially support and improve assessments under existing regulatory frameworks. The workshop provided an unique opportunity to initiate a process to re-examine the fundamentals of degradation and what current assessment methods can achieve by 1) providing an overview of the key elements and messages coming from recent research initiatives and 2) stimulating discussion regarding how these interrelate and how new findings can be developed to improve persistence assessments. Opportunities to try and improve understanding of factors affecting biodegradation assessments and better understanding of the persistence of chemicals (particularly UVCBs [substances of Unknown or Variable Composition, complex reaction products or Biological materials]) were identified and the workshop acted as a catalyst for further multi-stakeholder activities and engagements to take the persistence assessment of chemicals into the 21st Century. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ieam.4438DOI Listing
April 2021

Search for Dark Matter Produced in Association with a Dark Higgs Boson Decaying into W^{±}W^{∓} or ZZ in Fully Hadronic Final States from sqrt[s]=13  TeV pp Collisions Recorded with the ATLAS Detector.

Phys Rev Lett 2021 Mar;126(12):121802

CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.

Several extensions of the Standard Model predict the production of dark matter particles at the LHC. An uncharted signature of dark matter particles produced in association with VV=W^{±}W^{∓} or ZZ pairs from a decay of a dark Higgs boson s is searched for using 139  fb^{-1} of pp collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The s→V(qq[over ¯])V(qq[over ¯]) decays are reconstructed with a novel technique aimed at resolving the dense topology from boosted VV pairs using jets in the calorimeter and tracking information. Dark Higgs scenarios with m_{s}>160  GeV are excluded.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.126.121802DOI Listing
March 2021