Publications by authors named "J Robert Beck"

3,684 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exposure to relaxing words during sleep promotes slow-wave sleep and subjective sleep quality.

Sleep 2021 Jun 11. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.

Our thoughts alter our sleep, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We propose that mental processes are active to a greater or lesser extent during sleep and that this degree of activation affects our sleep depth. We examined this notion by activating the concept of "relaxation" during sleep using relaxation-related words in 50 healthy participants. In support of our hypothesis, playing relaxing words during non-rapid eye movement sleep extended the time spent in slow-wave sleep, increased power in the slow-wave activity band after the word cue, and abolished an asymmetrical sleep depth during the word presentation period. In addition, participants reported a higher sleep quality and elevated subjective alertness. Our results support the notion that the activation of mental concepts during sleep can influence sleep depth. They provide a basis for interventions using targeted activations to promote sleep depth and sleep quality to foster well-being and health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsab148DOI Listing
June 2021

Ribociclib plus fulvestrant for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer in the phase 3 randomized MONALEESA-3 trial: updated overall survival.

Ann Oncol 2021 May 15. Epub 2021 May 15.

University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Comprehensive Cancer Center Erlangen-EMN, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen, Germany.

Background: Ribociclib plus fulvestrant demonstrated significant progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) benefits in patients with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HR+/HER2-) advanced breast cancer (ABC). Here we present a new landmark in survival follow-up for a phase 3 CDK4/6 inhibitor clinical trial in patients with ABC (median [m], 56.3 months).

Patients And Methods: This phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted at 174 sites (30 countries). Patients were me and postmenopausal women (age ≥18 years) with histologically/cytologically confirmed HR+/HER2- ABC. Patients could have received ≤1-line endocrine therapy (ET) but no chemotherapy for ABC. Patients, assigned 2:1, were stratified by presence/absence of liver/lung metastases and previous ET. Patients received intramuscular fulvestrant (500 mg, day 1 each 28-day cycle, plus day 15 of cycle 1) with oral ribociclib (600 mg/day; 3-weeks-on,1-week-off) or placebo. Efficacy analyses were by intention-to-treat. Safety was assessed in patients receiving ≥1 dose study treatment. OS was a secondary endpoint. MONALEESA-3 is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02422615; no longer enrolling).

Results: Between June 18, 2015 and June 10, 2016, 726 patients were randomly assigned (484, ribociclib; 242, placebo). At data cutoff (October 30, 2020), mOS was 53.7 months (ribociclib) versus 41.5 months (placebo) (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; 95% CI, 0.59-0.90). Subgroup analyses were consistent with overall population. In the first-line setting, most patients in the ribociclib arm (≈60%) lived longer than median follow-up; mOS was 51.8 months in the placebo arm (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.88). In the second-line setting, mOS was 39.7 months (ribociclib) versus 33.7 months (placebo) (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.59-1.04). No apparent drug-drug interaction between ribociclib and fulvestrant or new safety signals were observed.

Conclusions: This analysis reported extended OS follow-up in MONALEESA-3. mOS was ≈12 months longer in patients with HR+/HER2- ABC treated with ribociclib plus fulvestrant compared with fulvestrant monotherapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annonc.2021.05.353DOI Listing
May 2021

High CPAP vs. NIPPV in preterm neonates - A physiological cross-over study.

J Perinatol 2021 Jun 5. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St. Michael's Hospital, Department of Critical Care, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Objective: To evaluate the physiological impact of high CPAP (≥9 cmHO) vs. NIPPV at equivalent mean airway pressures.

Study Design: In this cross-over study, preterm neonates on high CPAP or NIPPV were placed on the alternate mode. After 30 min, left and right ventricular cardiac output and work of breathing indices were assessed, following which patients were placed back on the original mode and a similar procedure ensued.

Results: Fifteen infants with mean (SD) postmenstrual age 32.7 (3.0) weeks, and weight 1569 (564) grams were included. No differences in LVO [320 (63) vs. 331 (86) mL/kg/min, P = 0.46] or RVO [420 (135) vs. 437 (141) mL/kg/min, P = 0.19] were noted during high CPAP vs. NIPPV, along with no differences in work of breathing indices.

Conclusion: High CPAP pressures did not adversely impact cardiac output or work of breathing compared to NIPPV at equivalent mean airway pressure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41372-021-01122-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8179075PMC
June 2021

What do we need to obtain high quality circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) for routine diagnostic test in oncology? - Considerations on pre-analytical aspects by the IFCC workgroup cfDNA.

Clin Chim Acta 2021 May 31. Epub 2021 May 31.

Dept Clinical Chemistry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

The analysis of circulating cell free DNA is an important tool for the analysis of tumor resistance, tumor heterogeneity, detection of minimal residual disease and detection of allograft rejection in kidney or heart transplant patients. The proper use of this technique is important, and starts with considering pre-analytic aspects. The current paper addresses some important technical considerations to ensure the proper and harmonized use of cfDNA techniques.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2021.05.033DOI Listing
May 2021

Can UVA-light-activated riboflavin-induced collagen crosslinking be transferred from ophthalmology to spine surgery? A feasibility study on bovine intervertebral disc.

PLoS One 2021 3;16(6):e0252672. Epub 2021 Jun 3.

Institute of Orthopaedic Research and Biomechanics, Trauma Research Center, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

Background: Collagen cross-links contribute to the mechanical resilience of the intervertebral disc (IVD). UVA-light-activated riboflavin-induced collagen crosslinking (UVA-CXL) is a well-established and effective ophthalmological intervention that increases the mechanical rigidity of the collagen-rich corneal matrix in Keratoconus. This study explores the feasibility, safety and efficacy of translating this intervention in reinforcing the IVD.

Methods: Annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were isolated from bovine IVDs and treated with different combinations of riboflavin (RF) concentrations (0.05-8 mM) and UVA light intensities (0.3-4 mW/cm2). Metabolic activity (resazurin assay), cell viability (TUNEL assay), and gene expression of apoptosis regulators C-FOS and PT5 were assessed immediately and 24 hours after treatment. Biomechanical effects of UVA-CXL on IVDs were measured by indentation analysis of changes in the instantaneous modulus and by peel-force delamination strength analysis of the AF prior and after treatment.

Results: Different intensities of UVA did not impair the metabolic activity of AF cells. However, RF affected metabolic activity (p < 0.001). PT53 expression was similar in all RF conditions tested while C-FOS expression decreased 24 hours after treatment. Twenty-four hours after treatment, no apoptotic cells were observed in any condition tested. Biomechanical characterizations showed a significant increase in the annular peel strength of the UVA-CXL group, when compared to controls of UVA and RF alone (p < 0.05). UVA-CXL treated IVDs showed up to 152% higher (p < 0.001) instantaneous modulus values compared to the untreated control.

Conclusion: This is the first study on UVA-CXL treatment of IVD. It induced significantly increased delamination strength and instantaneous modulus indentation values in intact IVD samples in a structure-function relationship. RF concentrations and UVA intensities utilized in ophthalmological clinical protocols were well tolerated by the AF cells. Our findings suggest that UVA-CXL may be a promising tool to reinforce the IVD matrix.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0252672PLOS
June 2021