Publications by authors named "J Q Mol"

499 Publications

Direct microbial electron uptake as a mechanism for stainless steel corrosion in aerobic environments.

Water Res 2022 May 5;219:118553. Epub 2022 May 5.

Electrobiomaterials Institute, Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang, 110819, China.

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an attractive model microbe for elucidating the biofilm-metal interactions that contribute to the billions of dollars in corrosion damage to industrial applications each year. Multiple mechanisms for S. oneidensis-enhanced corrosion have been proposed, but none of these mechanisms have previously been rigorously investigated with methods that rule out alternative routes for electron transfer. We found that S. oneidensis grown under aerobic conditions formed thick biofilms (∼50 µm) on stainless steel coupons, accelerating corrosion over sterile controls. H and flavins were ruled out as intermediary electron carriers because stainless steel did not reduce riboflavin and previous studies have demonstrated stainless does not generate H. Strain ∆mtrCBA, in which the genes for the most abundant porin-cytochrome conduit in S. oneidensis were deleted, corroded stainless steel substantially less than wild-type in aerobic cultures. Wild-type biofilms readily reduced nitrate with stainless steel as the sole electron donor under anaerobic conditions, but strain ∆mtrCBA did not. These results demonstrate that S. oneidensis can directly consume electrons from iron-containing metals and illustrate how direct metal-to-microbe electron transfer can be an important route for corrosion, even in aerobic environments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2022.118553DOI Listing
May 2022

Poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) coating of additively manufactured biodegradable porous iron.

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl 2021 Dec 16:112617. Epub 2021 Dec 16.

Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft, the Netherlands.

Additively manufacturing of porous iron offers a unique opportunity to increase its biodegradation rate by taking advantage of arbitrarily complex porous structures. Nevertheless, achieving the required biodegradation profile remains challenging due to the natural passivation of iron that decrease the biodegradation rate. Moreover, the biocompatibility of iron is reported to be limited. Here, we address both challenges by applying poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) coating to extrusion-based 3D printed porous iron. We characterized the specimens by performing in vitro biodegradation, electrochemical measurements, time-dependent mechanical tests, and in vitro cytocompatibility assays. The coated porous iron exhibited a biodegradation rate that was 2.6× higher than that of non-coated counterpart and maintained the bone-mimicking mechanical properties throughout biodegradation. Despite the formation of dense biodegradation products, the coating ensured a relatively stable biodegradation (i.e., 17% reduction in the degradation rate between days 14 and 28) as compared to that of non-coated specimens (i.e., 43% drop). Furthermore, the coating could be identified even after biodegradation, demonstrating the longevity of the coating. Finally, the coated specimens significantly increased the viability and supported the attachment and growth of preosteoblasts. Our results demonstrate the great potential of poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) coating for addressing the multiple challenges associated with the clinical adoption of porous iron.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2021.112617DOI Listing
December 2021

Vital Role of In-House 3D Lab to Create Unprecedented Solutions for Challenges in Spinal Surgery, Practical Guidelines and Clinical Case Series.

J Pers Med 2022 Mar 4;12(3). Epub 2022 Mar 4.

Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.

For decades, the advantages of rapid prototyping for clinical use have been recognized. However, demonstrations of potential solutions to treat spinal problems that cannot be solved otherwise are scarce. In this paper, we describe the development, regulatory process, and clinical application of two types of patient specific 3D-printed devices that were developed at an in-house 3D point-of-care facility. This 3D lab made it possible to elegantly treat patients with spinal problems that could not have been treated in a conventional manner. The first device, applied in three patients, is a printed nylon drill guide, with such accuracy that it can be used for insertion of cervical pedicle screws in very young children, which has been applied even in semi-acute settings. The other is a 3D-printed titanium spinal column prosthesis that was used to treat progressive and severe deformities due to lysis of the anterior column in three patients. The unique opportunity to control size, shape, and material characteristics allowed a relatively easy solution for these patients, who were developing paraplegia. In this paper, we discuss the pathway toward the design and final application, including technical file creation for dossier building and challenges within a point-of-care lab.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm12030395DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8951204PMC
March 2022

Mapping Conductance and Switching Behavior of Graphene Devices In Situ.

Small Methods 2022 Mar 15;6(3):e2101245. Epub 2021 Dec 15.

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830, USA.

Graphene is proposed for use in various nanodevice designs, many of which harness emergent quantum properties for device functionality. However, visualization, measurement, and manipulation become nontrivial at nanometer and atomic scales, representing a significant challenge for device fabrication, characterization, and optimization at length scales where quantum effects emerge. Here, proof of principle results at the crossroads between 2D nanoelectronic devices, e-beam-induced modulation, and imaging with secondary electron e-beam induced currents (SEEBIC) is presented. A device platform compatible with scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations is introduced. Then how the SEEBIC imaging technique can be used to visualize conductance and connectivity in single layer graphene nanodevices, even while supported on a thicker substrate (conditions under which conventional imaging fails) is shown. Finally, it is shown that the SEEBIC imaging technique can detect subtle differences in charge transport through time in nonohmic graphene nanoconstrictions indicating the potential to reveal dynamic electronic processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smtd.202101245DOI Listing
March 2022

IFNγ-Stimulated B Cells Inhibit T Follicular Helper Cells and Protect Against Atherosclerosis.

Front Cardiovasc Med 2022 2;9:781436. Epub 2022 Feb 2.

Division of BioTherapeutics, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research (LACDR), Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.

B and T cells are interconnected in the T follicular helper-germinal center B cell (T-GC B cell) axis, which is hyperactive during atherosclerosis development and loss of control along this axis results in exacerbated atherosclerosis. Inhibition of the T-GC B cell axis can be achieved by providing negative co-stimulation to T cells through the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. Therefore, we investigated a novel therapeutic strategy using PD-L1-expressing B cells to inhibit atherosclerosis. We found that IFNγ-stimulated B cells significantly enhanced PD-L1 expression and limited T cell development. To determine whether IFNγ-B cells can reduce collar-induced atherosclerosis, mice fed a Western-type diet were treated with PBS, B cells or IFNγ-B cells for a total of 5 weeks following collar placement. IFNγ-B cells significantly increased PD-L1 GC B cells and reduced plasmablasts. Interestingly, IFNγ-B cells-treated mice show increased atheroprotective Tregs and T cell-derived IL-10. In line with these findings, we observed a significant reduction in total lesion volume in carotid arteries of IFNγ-B cells-treated mice compared to PBS-treated mice and a similar trend was observed compared to B cell-treated mice. In conclusion, our data show that IFNγ-stimulated B cells strongly upregulate PD-L1, inhibit T cell responses and protect against atherosclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2022.781436DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8847680PMC
February 2022
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