Publications by authors named "J Moshe Gomori"

295 Publications

Curbing action potential generation or ATP-synthase leads to a decrease in in-cell pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in rat cerebrum slices.

Sci Rep 2021 May 13;11(1):10211. Epub 2021 May 13.

Department of Radiology, Hadassah Medical Center, The Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9112001, Jerusalem, Israel.

Direct and real-time monitoring of cerebral metabolism exploiting the drastic increase in sensitivity of hyperpolarized C-labeled metabolites holds the potential to report on neural activity via in-cell metabolic indicators. Here, we followed the metabolic consequences of curbing action potential generation and ATP-synthase in rat cerebrum slices, induced by tetrodotoxin and oligomycin, respectively. The results suggest that pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the cerebrum is 4.4-fold higher when neuronal firing is unperturbed. The PDH activity was 7.4-fold reduced in the presence of oligomycin, and served as a pharmacological control for testing the ability to determine changes to PDH activity in viable cerebrum slices. These findings may open a path towards utilization of PDH activity, observed by magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized C-labeled pyruvate, as a reporter of neural activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-89534-4DOI Listing
May 2021

Clopidogrel underactivity is a common in patients with acute symptomatic severe carotid stenosis.

J Neurol Sci 2021 Apr 14;425:117450. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Department of Neurosurgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Background: Clopidogrel is commonly used for secondary stroke prevention in patients with large vessel stenosis. Reduced Clopidogrel high on treatment platelet reactivity (CR) can lead to Clopidogrel underactivity (CU) causing acute thrombosis. However, the prevalence of CU among patients with acute symptomatic carotid disease remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to find the prevalence and identify the predictors for CU among patients with acutely symptomatic carotid stenosis.

Patients And Methods: Over the span of 14 months, CR was measured at the time of endovascular procedure in all patients undergoing angiography and stenting because of acute symptomatic carotid stenosis. Only patients treated per institutional protocol with a combination of Clopidogrel and Aspirin were included. CR was measured with VerifyNowP2Y12 reaction units (PRU) and CU was defined as PRU > 208. Patients with CU were compared to those without CU.

Results: Thirty-five patients were included (mean age 71.3 ± 10, 76% men) and twelve (34.3%, mean age 71.8 ± 8.4, 58% men) had CU at the time of endovascular intervention. On univariate analysis more severe carotid stenosis was seen in CU patients (92.6 ± 6.5% vs 81.6 ± 13.6%, p = 0.013) and percent stenosis was independently associated with CU on multivariate analysis (p = 0.023).

Conclusions: CU is present in 1 of every 3 patients with acutely symptomatic carotid disease. The current results suggest that CR testing should become part of routine care in patients with acutely symptomatic carotid disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2021.117450DOI Listing
April 2021

Flow-diverter stents in the early management of acutely ruptured brain aneurysms: effective rebleeding protection with low thromboembolic complications.

J Neurosurg 2021 Apr 16:1-8. Epub 2021 Apr 16.

4Neurology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; and.

Objective: Flow-diverter stents (FDSs) are not generally used for the management of acutely ruptured aneurysms with associated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Herein, the authors present their experience with FDSs in this scenario, focusing on the antiplatelet regimen, perioperative management, and outcome.

Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed their institutional database for the treatment and outcomes of all patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms and associated SAH from July 2010 to September 2018 who had received an FDS implant as stand-alone treatment within 4 days after diagnosis. The protocol with the use of flow diversion in these patients includes a low threshold for placement of external ventricular drains before stenting, followed by the administration of aspirin and clopidogrel with platelet testing before stent implantation. With this approach, the risk of hemorrhage and stent-related thrombus formation is limited. Demographic, clinical, technical, and imaging data were analyzed.

Results: Overall, 76 patients (61% females, mean age 42.8 ± 11.3 years) met the inclusion criteria. FDS implantation was performed a median of 2 days after diagnosis. On average, 1.05 devices were used per procedure. There was no procedural mortality directly attributed to the endovascular intervention. Procedural device-related clinical complications were recorded in a total of 6 cases (7.9%) and resulted in permanent neurological morbidity in 2 cases (2.6%). There was complete immediate aneurysm occlusion in 11 patients (14.5%), and persistent aneurysm filling was seen in 65 patients (85.5%). Despite this, no patient presented with rebleeding from the target aneurysm. There was an excellent clinical outcome in 62 patients (81.6%), who had a 90-day modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2. Among the 71 survivors, total or near-total occlusion was observed in 64/67 patients (95.5%) with a 3- to 6-month angiographic follow-up and in all cases evaluated at 12 months. Five patients (6.6%) died during follow-up for reasons unrelated to the procedure or new hemorrhage.

Conclusions: Flow diversion is an effective therapeutic strategy for the management of select acutely ruptured aneurysms. Despite low rates of immediate aneurysm occlusion after FDS implantation, the device exerts an important protective effect. The authors' experience confirmed no aneurysm rerupture, high rates of delayed complete occlusion, and complication rates that compare favorably with the rates obtained using other techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2020.10.JNS201642DOI Listing
April 2021

First multicenter experience using the Silk Vista flow diverter in 60 consecutive intracranial aneurysms: technical aspects.

J Neurointerv Surg 2021 Apr 8. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Radiology- Interventional Neuroradiology, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the technical success and procedural safety of the new Silk Vista device (SV) by evaluating the intraprocedural and periprocedural complication rate after its use in several institutions worldwide.

Methods: The study involved a retrospective review of multicenter data regarding a consecutive series of patients with intracranial aneurysms, treated with the SV between September 2020 and January 2021. Clinical, intra/periprocedural and angiographic data, including approach, materials used, aneurysm size and location, device/s, technical details and initial angiographic aneurysm occlusion, were analyzed.

Results: 60 aneurysms were treated with SV in 57 procedures. 66 devices were used, 3 removed and 63 implanted. The devices opened instantaneously in 60 out of 66 (91%) cases and complete wall apposition was achieved in 58 out of 63 (92%) devices implanted. In 4 out of 66 (6%) devices a partial opening of the distal end occurred, and in 5 (8%) devices incomplete apposition was reported. There were 3 (5%) intraprocedural thromboembolic events managed successfully with no permanent neurological morbidity, and 4 (7%) postprocedural events. There was no mortality in this study. The initial occlusion rates in the 60 aneurysms were as follows: O'Kelly-Marotta (OKM) A in 34 (57%) cases, OKM B in 15 (25%) cases, OKM C in 6 (10%) cases, and OKM D in 5 (8%) cases.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the use of the new flow diverter Silk Vista for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms is feasible and technically safe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2021-017421DOI Listing
April 2021

Intravenous Line Phase-Wrap Artifact at Bilateral Axial 3-T Breast MRI: Identification, Analysis, and Solution.

Radiol Imaging Cancer 2020 11 6;2(6):e200004. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Radiology, Penn State Health Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Penn State University Hospital, 500 University Dr, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (E.S.); Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel, Affiliated with the Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel (Y.A., J.M.G., S.F., T.S.); and Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel, Affiliated with the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel (T.A.K.).

Purpose: To understand and remove the source of a phase-wrap artifact produced by residual contrast agent in the intravenous line during acquisition of bilateral axial 3-T dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI.

Materials And Methods: A two-part study involved a phantom experiment, followed by an institutional review board approved clinical intervention, to evaluate the phase-wrap artifact at MRI. A phantom model evaluated artifact production by using an intravenous line filled with fluids with varying concentrations of gadolinium-based contrast agent (0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 mmol/mL) and by positioning the simulated intravenous line within several fields of view (FOV) at 3-T MRI in breast coils. Next, a clinical assessment was performed with a total of 400 patients (control group:interventional group, 200:200) to determine the effect of taping the intravenous line to the patients' backs. Breast MR images were assessed blindly for the presence of the artifact. Software was used for statistical analysis with a value of less than .05 considered a significant difference.

Results: In the phantom model, the artifact was produced only with a 0.4 mmol/mL gadolinium concentration and when the tubing was either close to the edge or within a FOV of 350-450 mm. In the clinical experiment, the artifact was more prevalent in the retrospective control group than in the prospective intervention group (52.5% [105 of 200] vs 22% [44 of 200]; < .005).

Conclusion: The presence of phase-wrap artifacts can be reduced by moving the contrast agent intravenous line out of the FOV during acquisition by taping it to a patient's back during bilateral axial 3-T DCE breast MRI. Breast, MR-Imaging, Phantom Studies© RSNA, 2020.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rycan.2020200004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7983766PMC
November 2020